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Two Days in Hanoi – How to Make the Most of It

by Juliana Hahn @ The Christina's Blog

Small alleys crammed with food stalls, delicious smells filling the air of the quaint Old Town streets and imposing monuments honoring Vietnam’s rich and turbulent history— all that and more is Hanoi. If you are planning a short trip here and want to see all the main attractions, this two-day itinerary of the capital is […]

The post Two Days in Hanoi – How to Make the Most of It appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

Circuit court denies all Peanut Corp. of America criminal appeals

by Dan Flynn @ Food Safety News

The three executives once associated with Peanut Corporation of America, and already serving lengthy jail terms, lost all their appeals today. A three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit in Atlanta upheld the criminal convictions of former PCA chief executive Stewart Parnell, his peanut broker brother Michael Parnell, and one-time... Continue Reading

Vietnam Lifestyle

by Stephen @ Vietnam Vacation

Naturally in S-shape, Vietnam, is a highly populated country with the population of over 90 millions of people spreading around from north to south. There are many distinguished lifestyles based [...]

The post Vietnam Lifestyle appeared first on Vietnam Vacation.

Workshop on “Developing local standards, local technical regulations and GS1 origin authentication solution” in Lam Dong

by Tran Dang Khoa @ GS1 Vietnam

Recently, GS1 Vietnam has cooperated with the Lam Dong Department of Standardization, Metrology and Quality, Bureau of TC4 of VSQI successfully hosted the workshop on “Developing local standards, local technical...

The post Workshop on “Developing local standards, local technical regulations and GS1 origin authentication solution” in Lam Dong appeared first on GS1 Vietnam.

Nuclear techniques applied in agro-food quality and safety control in China

by admin2 @ Global Food Safety Forum

Carlos Carbone   This article will present some of the latest trends studied by Chinese researchers for food traceability using nuclear techniques. Stable isotope analysis for agro-food provenance verification and authenticity discrimination This technique focuses on the use of isotopic fingerprinting techniques for food traceability. It’s becoming a reliable tool for this, due to the […]

San Diego County board ends emergency status for hepatitis A

by News Desk @ Food Safety News

San Diego County officials are banking on a four-week run with no new confirmed cases as a signal that a deadly hepatitis A outbreak is coming to an end. The county board voted unanimously Tuesday to end the emergency status that has been in place since Sept. 1. Public health officials updated the San Diego... Continue Reading

The importance of an early reality check – Asking cocoa farmers about pruning

by GCP-3 IP @ Food & Business Knowledge Platform

Ambra Tosto is a PhD Candidate at Wageningen University and Research working on the NWO Global Challenges Programme (GCP) project called "Cocoa crop improvement, farms and markets: a science-based approach to sustainably improving farmer food security in West Africa".  She has written this story of change following the GCP training on November 1, 2017, facilitated by Perspectivity. »

The post The importance of an early reality check – Asking cocoa farmers about pruning appeared first on Food & Business Knowledge Platform.

Ec2: BASELINE DATA COLLECTION FOR THE CEDIAM PROJECT MALI

Ec2: BASELINE DATA COLLECTION FOR THE CEDIAM PROJECT MALI

by NL4WorldBank @ Netherlands for the World Bank

Deadline: 23-Jan-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) Objective: The International Finance Corporation proposes to conduct a baseline data collection exercise, which will include topics on agri techniques, food consumption, access to finance, and gender. The data collection, … Continue reading

Vietnam sees growing potential for chicken export

by Huyền @ Bel Gà

Following several years of hardship, Vietnamese chicken is set to be exported to Japan in a couple of days and is expected to enter the European market in the near future. The first batch of Vietnamese chicken is scheduled to penetrate the Japanese market next week. The information was announced at the conference on the […]

The post Vietnam sees growing potential for chicken export appeared first on Bel Gà .

How to stay safe and avoid scams in Vietnam – Part 1: North Vietnam

by Tom Divers @ XO Tours Blog

Generally, Vietnam is a very safe country in which to travel. Compared to most major tourist cities in the West – Paris, London, New York, Rome – the streets of Vietnam’s urban centers are much less threatening. However, in some of the more popular tourist destinations in Vietnam, there are a handful of tourist scams and…

Thailand is the leading destination for Vietnamese in 2018

by indochinaresearch @ Indochina Research

Among surveyed Vietnamese from 18-64 living in urban Hanoi and HCM city, Thailand takes the leading position in intentions to travel for the year 2018 !  

The post Thailand is the leading destination for Vietnamese in 2018 appeared first on Indochina Research.

Opportunities in the Vietnamese agriculture sector

by Robert @ Nordesk – Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam

The post Opportunities in the Vietnamese agriculture sector appeared first on Nordesk - Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam.

Bones and the Mongol diet

Bones and the Mongol diet

by @ Eat This Podcast

The growing popularity of “Mongolian” restaurants owes less to Mongolian food and more to, er, how shall we say, marketing. To whit: "It’s actually not a cuisine, but an INTERACTIVE style of exhibition cooking modeled after a centuries-old legend. According to this legend, 12th century Mongol warriors, led by the mighty warrior, GENGHIS KHAN heated their shields over open fires to grill food in the fields of battle!" The question of what the Mongols under Genghis Khan actually ate, however, is really rather interesting. In particular, did conquering that vast empire change their diet in any way? Jack Fenner and his Mongolian colleagues Dashtseveg Tumen and Dorjpurev Khatanbaatar analysed bones from three different cemeteries, representing Mongol elites, Mongol commoners and Bronze-age people from the same area, looking for differences in what they ate. They found some, but interpretation remains difficult. I didn’t think to ask Jack about using a shield as a wok. Notes Read Food fit for a Khan: stable isotope analysis of the elite Mongol Empire cemetery at Tavan Tolgoi, Mongolia if you have access to the Journal of Archaeological Science. There is also an accessible write-up at the Bones don’t lie website. I don’t plan to visit the Genghis Grill, although I’m happy enough to plunder their advertising copy. And to point out that the mighty warrior didn't become Genghis Khan until the 13th century. Images from Michael Chu, Dave Gray and Wikimedia. Music by Chad Crouch, aka Podington Bear. This show is a week late; apologies. There's a sort of explanation at my other website, which also provides hints of shows to come. Plus, an explanation of what Flattr is all about, and why I think you should flattr me and other content creators.

Eat This Newsletter 63

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Another round-up of food news,from avocados to Xyllella

Eat This Newsletter 056

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

On rural people and agricultural work; on bagged salads and "healthy" food; on food photography

Rambling on my mind

Rambling on my mind

by @ Eat This Podcast

This episode of Eat This Podcast is something of a departure. With nothing in the pantry, so to speak, I had to make something with what I had: myself. So I hooked myself up to the audio recorder and went about some of my customary weekend cooking, muttering out loud about what I was doing and offering some reflections on my attitude to food and cooking. I hope the result sheds some light on where I’m coming from. Normal service will be resumed next episode. I started this exercise determined not to apologise either for having indulged myself so or for the audio quality. And I almost made it. But not quite. So, please accept my apologies, mostly for the quality of the audio at time. This stuff is not easy single handed. Also, no instructions from me on how to make your own yoghurt. If you want to learn the secrets of yoghurt as made by Turkish grannies, try The Food Programme. Notes The first recipe for my version of a light rye bread is here, though it doesn’t look very pretty. Pictures here. I need to transfer that recipe to the baking site, or better yet update it, because the current version is much better. A couple of earlier podcasts dealt with integrity vs “authenticity” and good industrialisation.

How to stay safe and avoid scams in Vietnam – Part 2: South Vietnam

by Tom Divers @ XO Tours Blog

In this, the second part of our two-part series on avoiding common tourist scams in Vietnam, we focus on popular tourist destinations in the south of the country. Saigon, Nha Trang and Hoi An all have their fair share of scams and safety hazards that travelers should be aware of. (Read Part 1 of this series…

2017 Training workshops on GS1 traceability in Vietnam

by Tran Dang Khoa @ GS1 Vietnam

In order to promote GS1 traceability standards in Vietnam, this year, GS1 Vietnam has cooperated with some Departments of Standardization, Metrology and Quality and other organizations such as the Institute...

The post 2017 Training workshops on GS1 traceability in Vietnam appeared first on GS1 Vietnam.

Creating Stories of Change

by F&BKP Office @ Food & Business Knowledge Platform

On November 1, 2017, NWO-WOTRO together with the Food & Business Knowledge Platform offered a training to GCP consortia on how to write and tell stories of change. The training was set up to enhance the skills of GCP researchers to identify and present their research insights to various target audiences. »

The post Creating Stories of Change appeared first on Food & Business Knowledge Platform.

Vietnamese middle class facts

by Robert @ Nordesk – Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam

Few facts about the Vietnamese middle class. Rising purchasing power and willingness to spend Vietnamese middle classes purchasing power is increasing fast, their disposable income increased by 32% between 2010 and 2015. In the same time, household spending increased by 33%. New shopping habits From wet markets, Vietnamese have shifted to modern-trade. Supermarkets, convenience stores

The post Vietnamese middle class facts appeared first on Nordesk - Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam.

Mistaken about mayonnaise — and many other foods

Mistaken about mayonnaise — and many other foods

by @ Eat This Podcast

Alternative food facts tramp across the landscape the hordes of the undead. Tom Nealon's new book Food Fights & Culture Wars aims to lay some of them to rest.

What the Vietnamese Eat For Breakfast

by Stephen @ Vietnam Vacation

The “culture” of breakfast is a significant thing when tourists think of a country, especially the country which has a diverse culinary like Vietnam. Here is top most popular breakfast [...]

The post What the Vietnamese Eat For Breakfast appeared first on Vietnam Vacation.

China’s Demonstration Supermarkets to Set Best Practices in Food Safety

by admin2 @ Global Food Safety Forum

  Yushuang Sun   China has been engulfed in food safety crises as a litany of food safety incidents unveiled regulatory loopholes and severely undermined consumer confidence in the domestic food market. Amid the turmoil, the country has attempted to revamp its institutional and legal frameworks over the past five years. In 2013, the China […]

Exploring Kazakhstan’s apple forests

Exploring Kazakhstan’s apple forests

by @ Eat This Podcast

Kazakhstan stretches across Central Asia from the Caspian Sea in the east to China in the west. The country is famous for many things – it is the largest landlocked country in the world, says Wikipedia – but among food and plant people it is most important as the home of the apple. The name of the former capital, Almaty, is often translated as Father of Apples, and it was to Almaty that Ben Reade, today’s guest, recently went with a botanist friend in search of good wild apples. He found them, and much else besides. It is worth pointing out that the now common wisdom – that the domestic apple Malus domesticus was selected from a wild relative Malus sieversii, rather than being a hybrid – has only recently been accepted. Barrie Juniper, of Oxford University, brought all manner of evidence to bear on the question, including some of the first DNA studies of crops. His book, The Story of the Apple is a great read, and some of his knowledge has clearly found its way to his daughter Sarah, The Apple Factor. I also spent a little time looking into Ben’s throwaway remark about “lightly fermented carrot salad”. The New York Times, no less, avers that “Korean carrot salad, morkovcha koreyska, … is a legacy of Stalin’s mass deportations of ethnic Koreans from the far eastern Soviet Union to its western frontiers.” I found a couple of recipes here and here, and although I haven’t tried either, I plan to do so soon. Neither seems to be “authentic,” not least because I’m not sure they would ferment at all. I’d be interested to know more. Notes I Went to the Fatherland of All Modern Apples is Ben Reade’s own account of his trip. The first ever Eat this Podcast consisted of Ben talking about bog butter. The guy gets around. Photos on this page from Ben, and there are lots more in his article.

Food safety in Vietnam

Food safety in Vietnam


Eat This Podcast

reshness is responsible for much of the safety as well as the deliciousness of Vietnamese dishes. Researchers have found freshness to be the most preferred attribute of pork for Vietnamese consumers, with pork meat typically being purchased very fresh every day."

Food, hunger and conflict

Food, hunger and conflict

by @ Eat This Podcast

A couple of weeks ago I was at the 2nd annual Amsterdam Symposium on the History of Food, and a very interesting meeting it was too. The topic was Food, Hunger and Conflict, a reminder that food and control of the food supply can be both a weapon in human conflicts and a natural source of conflict. Talks ranged widely, from the politics of starvation under the Nazis to hunger in colonial Indonesia to the part food riots in the past played in winning food security. Some of it was – and I’m avoiding obvious wordplay – very hard to listen to. All of it was enlightening. There wasn’t as much time as I hoped during the packed but brief programme to record everything I wanted to, but I did get to talk to Ian Miller about force feeding and to Christianne Muusers about one Dutch wartime recipe that most people would rather forget. I hope to have some of the other speakers on the show soon. Notes Details of the Symposium here Ian Miller has a website called Digesting the Medical Past. Christianne Muusers’ site is called Coquinaria and there’s some more information on tulip bulbs as food from Green Deane. The tulip in the photo is China Pink, and I took it. The banner photo shows Thomas Ashe's funeral.

A visit to Koshari Street

A visit to Koshari Street

by @ Eat This Podcast

Street food is big. Not just in places where eating on the street is the only place many people can afford, but in happening neighbourhoods around the rich world too. Burrito trucks, Korean barbecue in a taco, ceviche, you name it; all are available on the streets of London and Los Angeles, Sydney and San Francisco. They have strange exotic takes on porchetta on the streets of Raleigh, North Carolina, and pizza ovens parked in English railway station forecourts. In many neighbourhods you can barely move for falafels. One of the iconic street foods of Egypt – koshari – is now available in London, in a slightly upmarket hole in the wall place. I've always maintained that this podcast is not about happening restaurants or the latest groovy cocktails, but the chef who made Koshari Street happen happens to be a friend, so on a recent visit, I went to try for myself. And, of course, we talked about far more than the restaurant.   Notes Koshari Street is at 56 St Martin’s Lane, London, WC2N 4EA. And online Anissa Helou is also online and her book Mediterranean Street Food is still available. We were interrupted by Lauren Bohn, and she too has an online presence, although there’s not much evidence there of her interest in food.

TOP 5 Day Trips from Ho Chi Minh City

by Brinda Shah @ XO Tours Blog

We recently put together for you an itinerary for exploring Ho Chi Minh City as part of our Custom Itineraries for Vietnam series.  After you have explored Ho Chi Minh City and if you have an extra day in your travel itinerary, short day trips are a great option.  Fortunately, outside of the city, there are several places…

Food safety | Neovia Vietnam

Food safety | Neovia Vietnam


Neovia Vietnam

Quality and food safety are at the heart of the Neovia approach as well as the organization of its commercial and industrial processes. They are present at each distribution and production stage.

Vermont and the taste of place

Vermont and the taste of place

by @ Eat This Podcast

What do artisanal cheese and maple syrup have in common? In North America, and elsewhere too, they’re likely to bring to mind the state of Vermont, which produces more of both than anywhere else. They’re also the research focus of Amy Trubek at the University of Vermont, a trained chef and cultural anthropologist. Trubek gave one of the keynote speeches at the recent Perugia Food Conference, saying that terroir – which she translates as the taste of place – combines two elements. There is the taste itself, which when people talk about it with one another becomes a social experience that, she said, lends meaning to eating and drinking. And it is “a story we tell to assure that our food and drink emerges from natural environments and conditions.” Vermont cheese, at least the lovingly crafted artisanal kind, as much as maple syrup, reflects those concerns with natural environments and conditions. In our interview, we didn’t dwell too much on the scientific research underpinning Amy Trubek’s ideas. I found the idea that simply knowing the personal story of a cheese – who makes it, where, why – can influence how you respond to it fascinating. Taste, surely, is physiological. How would the story affect that? But it does. In one study of four different cheeses, people heard either a generic story about that cheese category, taken “from dairy science manuals,” or “socially and contextually relevant production information”. No matter how much they actually liked the cheese, or their “foodiness” on an established scale, people who had been told personal stories about the cheesemakers liked the cheese more than those told about the cheese alone. (See Note 3 below.) What’s more, according to Rachel DiStefano, who did a Master’s thesis with Amy Trubek, cheesemongers are vital allies in telling the stories and thus helping consumers to value artisanal cheeses. By contrast, terroir for maple syrup does seem to be less about personal stories and more about the soils the trees are in and the details of turning sap into syrup. Trubek has worked with a large, multidisciplinary team to create new standards and vocabulary that take discussions well beyond “sweet”. And yes, there is some evidence that soil does affect taste: [S]yrup produced from trees on limestone bedrock had the highest quantities of copper, magnesium, calcium and silica, which scientists hypothesized had a role in the taste. Shale syrups came in second in all of these substances, followed by schist. A final thought: Amy Trubek’s throwaway remark about fake maple flavour sent me down an internet rabbit hole that in the end proved surprisingly productive. Notes The 2nd Perugia Food Conference Of Places and Tastes: Terroir, Locality, and the Negotiation of Gastro-cultural Boundaries took place from 5–8 June 2014. It was organized by the Food Studies Program of the Umbra Institute. Sign photograph by Katherine Martinelli. Consumer sensory perception of cheese depends on context: A study using comment analysis and linear mixed models. Rachel DiStefano has written about her field work, behind the counter of a specialist cheese shop in Cambridge, Ma. If you’re entertaining thoughts of maple syrup expertise, you’ll need to study the new sensory maps and be able to talk knowledgeably about the history of sugaring. Other images by Rachel DiStefano.

Eat This Newsletter 065

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

I suppose it is inevitable that the things that catch my attention are the things that are on my mind. This issue of the newsletter reflects that to a greater than usual extent. Antibiotics, food systems, apple breeding, kale and some key references.

There’s snow place like home, unless you’re an RV snowbird

by Cookson Beecher @ Food Safety News

Just as feathered birds head south for warmer weather, so, too, do human snowbirds, who pack up their RVs and travel trailers they call home once they get to their sunny destinations. But food-safety gurus warn that there’s no vacation from food safety. “I don’t subscribe to the ‘knock-on-wood’ approach to food safety,” said Bill... Continue Reading

Cold chain in Vietnam

by Robert @ Nordesk – Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam

The post Cold chain in Vietnam appeared first on Nordesk - Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam.

Too hot to handle?

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Here's part of the pitch for Jeremy Parzen's seminar in Food and Wine Journalism in Piedmont in the autumn.

Japanese food through Canadian eyes

Japanese food through Canadian eyes

by @ Eat This Podcast

I’m fascinated by Japanese food, but from a position of profound ignorance. I’ve never been there and I’ve never having eaten anything I could definitely say was “genuine,” aside from a wasabi chocolate cake baked by a Japanese friend. So the opportunity to talk to a Westerner living in Japan was one I leaped at. Jason Irwin is a Canadian who has been helping people in Japan learn English for the past seven years. He’s not in a big city, and he is part of a Japanese family, so he probably has a better understanding than many. He’s also leaving Japan soon. Time, obviously, to talk. As I mention in the podcast outro, I still find it rather remarkable that I can be online friends with a Canadian living in Japan and record us having a conversation. The recording bit is nothing special these days, I suppose, but the online friendship is the result of this thing called app dot net, aka ADN. It’s a special kind of social platform, one where the people who use it are the customers, as opposed to the others, where users are just a bulk commodity to be sold to the highest bidder. ADN celebrated its second birthday two days ago, and I've been there two years today. I've I get a lot out of ADN, not least my conversations with Jason, although I have never done anything to evangelize about it. Consider this a plug. Notes Cover photo is Ise-ebi: Crawfish or Spiny Lobster and Ebi: shrimp by Utagawa Hiroshige. Jason’s website is well worth a read. On food, I thought I would single out two posts about some of the Canadian foods he missed in Japan: Food I miss the most and I am not a chef ... but you'll have to ask him yourself for the details of how to prepare ham cooked in Canada Dry Ginger ale. Aside from everything else that people say it could be, I find ADN to be just a very fine micro-blogging platform. You might too. Banner photograph modified from an original by Linh Nguyen.

A deep dive into cucurbit names

A deep dive into cucurbit names

by @ Eat This Podcast

Continuing the short season of bits and pieces that didn't quite fit in the year's episodes by getting to grips with the origin of "gherkin" and other names we give cucurbits.

Importing goods to Vietnam : Survival guide

by Robert @ Nordesk – Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam

The post Importing goods to Vietnam : Survival guide appeared first on Nordesk - Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam.

Food Safety in Vietnam - Vietnam Vacation

Food Safety in Vietnam - Vietnam Vacation


Vietnam Vacation

The issue of food safety in Vietnam is becoming more urgent than ever. Food in Vietnam is not always clean especially street food or in sidewalk eateries. Because clean and [...]

Company stops selling vinyl gloves; cites food safety risks

by Catharine Huddle @ Food Safety News

Citing growing scientific evidence, specialist glove supplier Eagle Protect has discontinued selling vinyl gloves. Vinyl gloves, also called PVC gloves, contain a heavy chlorine content. PVC is a widely produced synthetic plastic polymer. The rigid form of PVC is used to make pipes. California-based Eagle Protect is not alone.  China stopped manufacturing the gloves last... Continue Reading

VN sends FIRST poultry batch to Japan

by Huyền @ Bel Gà

LONG AN — The first batch of Vietnamese chicken was exported to Japan on Saturday, marking a milestone in the country’s efforts to open the discerning Japanese market. The 30 tonnes of chicken wings, thighs and breasts were shipped by the Koyu & Unitek Co, a joint venture between Australia and Japan in southern Đồng Nai […]

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Food safety opportunity in Vietnam for European companies

by Robert @ Nordesk – Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam

The post Food safety opportunity in Vietnam for European companies appeared first on Nordesk - Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam.

Food and status

Food and status

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Food has always been a marker of social status, only today no elite eater worth their pink Himalayan salt would be seen dead with a slice of fluffy white bread, once the envy of the lower orders.

Eat This Newsletter 047

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Long reads on a range of topics: sugar, sodas, food systems, pickles, pasta, military rations, curry houses and Great British tosh.

Food and status

Food and status

by @ Eat This Podcast

Food has always been a marker of social status, only today no elite eater worth their pink Himalayan salt would be seen dead with a slice of fluffy white bread, once the envy of the lower orders.

The Global Standard Diet

The Global Standard Diet

by @ Eat This Podcast

We’ll have what they’re having has taken on a whole new meaning In a world in which you can get pizza in Tokyo and sushi in Rome, diets have become truly global in reach. You could argue that this has made them more, not less, diverse. Where once rice dominated Asia, wheat, potatoes and corn have made huge inroads: increased diversity. On the other hand, places that used to enjoy their own, local staples – tef in Ethiopia, buckwheat in eastern Europe – have also come under the sway of the global behemoths, and so have lost diversity. Those are two conclusions of a massive data-mining exercise that has rightfully been getting a lot of coverage: Increasing homogeneity in global food supplies and the implications for food security. I spoke to Colin Khoury, the study’s first author, about the increasing dominance of the big crops, the marginalisation of regionally important alternatives, and the sudden rise of a whole set of previously insignificant species. As we discussed, this new piece of research arose from a desire to provide updated and more accurate answers to the perennial question How many crops feed the world?, originally posed by Robert and Christine Prescott-Allen in 1990. It’s kind of gratifying to note that Colin Khoury first returned to that question in a guest post on one of my other platforms. And we’re still gnawing away at it over there, one way and another. So, how many crops feed the world anyway? [I]f you must know, it’s about 94 plant species that largely feed the world. To be more precise, according to the analysis of Colin and his colleagues, we can now say that 50 crops, or 94 species, contribute to 90% of food supplies at national level.

Crispy crunchy mega-munchy

Crispy crunchy mega-munchy

by @ Eat This Podcast

I am reliably informed that the taste of a soggy potato crisp – or chip, if you prefer – is identical to that of a crispy one. But the experience falls far short of enjoyable. A crisp needs to be, well, crisp. If it isn’t, it actually tastes bad. That’s not quite so true of things like fried or oven-roasted potato chips; they still taste pretty good when they’re not quite so crispy, but they’re even better when they are crispy, and that goes for a whole lot of other cooked crispy things too. Which is why it is such a shame that by the time you get to the bottom of a plateful of fries or nachos, they’re soggy. Not to mention thin-crust pizza in a box. Ken Albala, a food historian at the University of the Pacific in Stockton California, happens to be an accomplished ceramicist, so he invented a plate that helps keep foods crispy. And that prompted an episode on crispy crunchiness. The argument that the appeal of crispiness is innate – that is was selected for by evolution – is not that far-fetched. John S. Allen, a research scientist at the Dornsife Cognitive Neuroscience Imaging Center and the Brain and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California, writes that “[c]rispy foods are certainly not the only type of food that humans find appealing, and of course some people do not even like them. But the pervasive appeal of crispy is clearly something that emerges out of our multiple, interacting histories”. There’s more to it than just the texture or the sound of the food breaking in our heads, but there does seem to be something to Allen’s ideas. What, though, is the difference between crisp and crispy? My sister says that, for her, carrots are crisp, while fried noodles are crispy, and that’s an importance distinction, for her. I’m not so sure. I think one could possibly separate out the texture from the flavour, at least experimentally, and see whether there really is a difference. Of course all sorts of sensations affect the experience of eating something, but whatever the truth of the matter, I’d just as soon not have to eat soggy crisps. Notes Ken Albala blogs and has an interesting Facebook page. Why Humans Are Crazy for Crispy is an essay by John S. Allen, adapted from his book The Omnivorous Mind. Intro music by Dan-O at DanoSongs.com.

Crime and nourishment

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

When people get their SNAP benefits is associated with when grocery store crimes are committed. And it's almost impossible to follow government dietary guidelines on the government's food assistance.

About GEPIR

by Dac Minh @ GS1 Vietnam

GEPIR (Global Electronic Party Information Registry) is a unique, internet-based service that gives access to basic contact information for companies that are members of GS1. These member companies use GS1’s...

The post About GEPIR appeared first on GS1 Vietnam.

GS1 Traceability For Food Safety In Viet Nam - GS1 Vietnam

GS1 Traceability For Food Safety In Viet Nam - GS1 Vietnam


GS1 Vietnam

Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi City is two largest foodstuffs markets in the country. Prior to the problem of food unsafety, the cities have taken some management actions to...

Sustainable livestock futures—BMZ, GIZ and ILRI at the Global Forum for Food and Agriculture this week

Sustainable livestock futures—BMZ, GIZ and ILRI at the Global Forum for Food and Agriculture this week

by Susan MacMillan @ ILRI news

For several days this week (18–20 Jan 2018), several scientific directors and staff of the International Livestock Research Institute (ILRI)—Jimmy Smith, Shirley Tarawali, Dieter Schillinger, Lutz Merbold and Kristina Roesel—will be participating with several ILRI partners in the Global Forum for Food and Agriculture (GFFA), held in Berlin, Germany. This annual German three-day international conference focuses on the future of the global agri-food industry. Now in its tenth year, the GFFA in 2018 is focusing on Shaping the Future of Livestock—Sustainably, Responsibly, Efficiently. Continue reading

IFC kicks off food safety initiative

by Huyền @ Bel Gà

Vietnam Food Safety Project to assist local food companies in enhancing agribusiness sustainability. The International Finance Corporation (IFC), a member of the World Bank Group, signed an advisory agreement with the Bel Ga JSC, a Vietnam-based poultry breeding firm, and launched its Vietnam Food Safety Project at a conference held on July 1 in Ho […]

The post IFC kicks off food safety initiative appeared first on Bel Gà .

Changing Global Diets: the website

Changing Global Diets: the website

by @ Eat This Podcast

A picture is worth way more than 1000 words when it reveals food trends over the past 50 years for more than 150 countries.

Enjoying life on a rather restricted regimen

Enjoying life on a rather restricted regimen

by @ Eat This Podcast

By great good fortune, there is nothing I cannot eat. There are a couple of things I'd prefer not to eat, but nothing, at least as far as I know, that would make me ill. As a result, I am fascinated by people who have to forego certain foods to stay well. I used to follow someone on the web who swore that something called the Specific Carbohydrate Diet™-- which, I learn, apparently requires initial caps and a TM symbol -- was the only thing that kept her alive. I never really investigated further, because that was before I had a podcast to feed and she more or less stopped writing about it. So when the chance arose to talk to someone who is living with the disease and the diet, I leaped at it. Victoria Young is a journalist who has been following the SCD™ for about seven years. She says that it has actually renewed her relationship with food, partly by making her think hard about what she eats. Far from being a dull diet that is all about avoiding things, it forces her to be inventive with the things she can eat. And she says she's never felt better. The medical establishment may not be too keen on the SCD™ but the proof of the pudding -- assuming you can in fact make a pudding that complies -- does seem to be in the eating. Notes Victoria Young's website links to her blog How to eat (when you can't eat anything at all). She tweets @tory21. The mother lode on the SCD™ is Elaine Gottschall's book Breaking the Vicious Cycle: Intestinal Health Through Diet. Once again, I'm plaintively asking you to rate and review the show on iTunes. I know that's pathetic, but it honestly does help. The banner photo of a stained section of inflamed bowel is from Wikimedia, and doesn't it take me back ...

Food prices and social unrest

Food prices and social unrest

by @ Eat This Podcast

“If you can tell your story with a graph or picture, do so,” says Marc Bellemare, my first guest in this episode. The picture on the left is one of his: “a graph that essentially tells you the whole story in one simple, self-explanatory picture.” Yes indeed, social unrest is caused by higher food prices. ((Yes, caused; this is no mere correlation.)) I could leave it at that, along with a link to the paper from which I lifted the picture. But this is a podcast. I have to talk to people, and that includes Marc Bellemare. Bellemare’s paper is a global investigation that doesn’t even attempt to ask whether the relationship between food prices and social unrest holds for countries or smaller areas. My sense, though, is that the relationship is strongest in more authoritarian regimes. At least, that’s where we’ve seen most food riots of late. In this, however, it seems I am mistaken. Marc pointed me to Cullen Hendrix, who has studied the links between social unrest and political regimes. Placating the urban masses who eat food at the expense of rural people who produce it has always been a fraught proposition, perhaps even more so for democracies. All of which raises the question that, I hope, keeps food policy wallahs and agricultural development experts awake at night. What’s so wrong with high prices anyway? Notes Marc Bellemare’s blog post on his paper Rising Food Prices, Food Price Volatility, and Social Unrest. He also examined some of the reactions to the paper. “Even when presenting to the smartest people in the world, a picture is really worth a thousand words.” Find this and Marc’s other tips for conference and seminar presentations here. Cullen Hendrix’s website contains a copy of his paper International Food Prices, Regime Type, and Protest in the Developing World The sound montage at the beginning draws on various reports on Haiti, Egypt and Tunisia, all glued together by a splendid recording of a protest march. The banner photograph is adapted from an original by Martin Bureau/AFP/Getty Images.

Training course on GS1 numbers & barcodes and quality award in Nam Dinh

by Tran Dang Khoa @ GS1 Vietnam

Recently, GS1 Vietnam cooperated with Nam Dinh Department of Standardization, Metrology and Quality and the National Awards Office successfully organized the training course on GS1 numbers & barcodes and National...

The post Training course on GS1 numbers & barcodes and quality award in Nam Dinh appeared first on GS1 Vietnam.

A Ukrainian Expat and Her Family Serve Up Favourites From Home

by The Historienne @ HOTTABLE

The food and the space, featuring red tablecloths and retro Soviet-era posters, are masterminded by Nguyen Svitlana.

The post A Ukrainian Expat and Her Family Serve Up Favourites From Home appeared first on HOTTABLE.

GEPIR: Global Electronic Party Information Registry

by Dac Minh @ GS1 Vietnam

GEPIR is a unique, internet-based service that gives access to basic contact information for companies that are members of GS1.

The post GEPIR: Global Electronic Party Information Registry appeared first on GS1 Vietnam.

Feeding people is easy

Feeding people is easy

by @ Eat This Podcast

First let's decide what kind of food supply system we want, then use that to bring about a renaissance in real farming.

How to bake bread in a microwave oven

How to bake bread in a microwave oven

by @ Eat This Podcast

Say you wanted to bake bread in a microwave – I can’t think why, but say you did – you could go online and search the internets for a recipe. And you would come up with a few. Just reading them over, they didn’t seem all that appetising. One, for example, warned that you had to serve the bread toasted. What’s the point of that? Anyway, that didn’t deter Ken Albala, a professor at the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California, but rather than search the internet, he turned to ancient Egypt for inspiration. In thinking about ways in which the material culture of food might change in the future, for the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery, he came up with not only the plate that keeps crispy things crunchy, but also a way to bake bread in a microwave. Not great bread, but acceptable bread. Why? Well, partly because it is hot where Ken lives, and he doesn’t like putting the oven on just to bake bread. And partly because he foresees a future in which space is at a premium, cooking, maybe, is deskilled, and ovens, where they exist, are used for storing stuff, not baking. Turns out, though, that there’s method to Ken’s madness. I’d always thought that microwaves heat water molecules and that’s that. Apparently not, as I learned from Len Fisher at Bristol University. Apparently some ceramics absorb microwaves and others don’t, and if you have a ceramic that absorbs microwaves, watch out. It can get very hot. Hot enough to turn bread dough to toast in less than 7 minutes. Len admitted that he didn’t fully understand the physics of different ceramics in the microwave, which means there’s no chance for me and you. But he did think he’d invented something along the lines of Ken’s bread mould. Turns out someone had already patented it, although as far as I can tell the patent has lapsed and nobody ever did anything with it. Or did they? If you’re aware of a container designed to bake bread in the microwave, please leave a comment. Notes Ken Albala blogs and has an interesting Facebook page. Len Fisher also has a website, and it is well worth exploring. Intro music by Dan-O at DanoSongs.com.

Hunger and malnutrition

Hunger and malnutrition

by @ Eat This Podcast

One week jam, the next global hunger and malnutrition. That’s the joy of Eat This Podcast; I get to present what interests me, in the hope that it interests you too. It also means I sometimes get to talk to my friends about how they see the big picture around food. Dr Jessica Fanzo, Assistant Professor of Nutrition at Columbia University’s Insitute of Human Nutrition, Special Advisor on Nutrition Policy at the Earth Institute’s Center on Globalization and Sustainable Development, also at Columbia, and much else besides, is one such friend. She was in Rome recently for a preparatory meeting for a big UN conference on nutrition next year, so I took the opportunity to catch up, and to ask some very basic questions about global hunger. I confess, I have very little time for the global talk shops that meet so that, somehow, magically, the poor can eat. And having attended a few, there does seem to be a dearth of people who have studied malnutrition and hunger first hand, and made a difference. Jess Fanzo has been promoting the idea of nutrition-sensitive agriculture as a way to make a difference locally, while recognizing that there can be no simple, global solutions. You have to see what works in one place, and then adapt it to your own circumstances. There are no simple global solutions. The primary point – that governments have some responsibility for ensuring that their citizens at least have the opportunity to be well-nourished – seems often to be lost in the din of governments talking about other things. And interfering busybodies declaring war on hunger don’t seem to have much luck either. I don’t have any solutions. Notes Check out Dr Fanzo’s credentials at the Institute of Human Nutrition and the Center for Globalization and Sustainable Development. She was also the first winner of the Premio Daniel Carasso; there’s a video about that too. She’s written about her fieldwork and how it informs her global view. (And, as an aside, how come big-shot bloggers don’t care about spam? Come on, people. Your negligence makes life worse for everybody.) The Integration of Nutrition into Extension and Advisory Services: A Synthesis of Experiences, Lessons, and Recommendations reports on ways to promote nutrition-sensitive agriculture. And the research extends to social media. The paper I mentioned, from the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, is Comparative impact of climatic and nonclimatic factors on global terrestrial carbon and water cycles. Photo of Jess Fanzo in Timor Leste by Nick Appleby. Engage

Fermentation revisited

Fermentation revisited

by @ Eat This Podcast

Apologies for the delay in publishing this podcast. One of the joys of not being tied to "proper" radio is the freedom to give a story the length it deserves. The downside is that nobody is cracking the whip to whip things into shape on time, so that sometimes, even with the best will in the world, the schedule slips. Maybe if this were my day job ... Bread, yoghurt, pickles: I do love my domestic microbiology. So does Ken Albala, of the University of the Pacific in Stockton, California. His enthusiasm outstrips mine, though, not least because he probably has more space for his experiments. One manifestation of that enthusiasm is a Facebook group dedicated to The Cult of Pre-Pasteurian Preservation and Food Preparation. For Ken, sterilising fermented food is a no-no. Who better, then, to explain how it is that “pickled” has come to mean “boiled in vinegar” rather than “naturally fermented”. Of course, the whole business of home fermentation has reached fever pitch, manifested by the pickle trend being the number one sketch on a trendy comedy series. Let us not, however, throw the baby out with the brinewater. It really is remarkably easy, and if you want to start, there are endless reams of advice on the internet. Just ignore anything that suggests you boil the proceeds. Emboldened by Ken, I do plan to try sausages some time in the New Year. Notes If you’re on Facebook, do check out Ken Albala’s Cult. The current main man on fermentation is Sandor Katz; here’s what he has to say on facultative anaerobes (i.e. Lactobacillus species) versus obligate anaerobes such as Clostridium botulinum, and why you really have nothing to fear. Katz also did a great interview with NPR’s Fresh Air. Engage

Ec2: DEVELOPMENT OF COASTAL MULTI-HAZARD MAPPING, VULNERABILITY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AND INVESTMENT FRAMEWORK FOR COASTAL INTERVENTIONS IN SELECTED COASTAL COMMUNITIES IN VIETNAM

Ec2: DEVELOPMENT OF COASTAL MULTI-HAZARD MAPPING, VULNERABILITY AND RISK ASSESSMENTS AND INVESTMENT FRAMEWORK FOR COASTAL INTERVENTIONS IN SELECTED COASTAL COMMUNITIES IN VIETNAM

by NL4WorldBank @ Netherlands for the World Bank

Deadline: 10-Feb-2018 at 11:59:59 PM (Eastern Time – Washington D.C.) Objective: The World Bank is providing support to the Government of Vietnam (GoV) for the implementation of the second phase of the Technical Assistance (TA) funded by the Global Facility … Continue reading

China Adopts Tightened Rules Governing Food Safety Online and Retail Food Sectors

by admin2 @ Global Food Safety Forum

Yushuang Sun   Online food ordering and delivery services have brought significant changes to the farm-to-fork food supply chain in China. According to a report released by China’s largest restaurant food delivery platform, Meituan-Dianping, food delivery revenues tripled in 2016 to RMB 130 billion (USD 20 billion) and have the potential to reach RMB 300 […]

Interview with Mr. Yao Yuan 姚远先生新闻采访

by admin2 @ Global Food Safety Forum

  Interview with Mr. Yao Yuan 姚远先生新闻采访 conducted by Rick Gilmore, Chairman of GFSF GFSF主席—瑞克▪吉尔莫主持 Biographical Information   As the first person in charge of the Global Food Safety Forum (GFSF)-China, Mr. Yao Yuan has won wide recognition from Chinese government and enterprises through active and tenacious efforts over the past five years. Under his […]

The haybox through history

The haybox through history

by @ Eat This Podcast

   Huffduff it This year’s Amsterdam Symposium on the History of Food was dedicated to The material culture of cooking tools and techniques and was full of fascinating stuff. I especially enjoyed a talk on the hay box, the original slow cooker. The principle is simplicity itself. Bring a pot full of food to the boil and then insulate it really well so that it cools down very slowly. The food continues to cook as it cools down and if your insulation is good enough you can come back hours later to find a hot, properly cooked meal. The haybox actually has quite a long history, with three Gold Medals awarded to a Mr Johan Sörensen at the Paris Exhibition in 1867. Various patents were granted to Sörensen and others, and the idea was promoted for "fishermen, pilots, and others whose small vessels are not generally so constructed as to enable them to procure hot food while at sea" and, eventually, domestic cooks. In his talk, Jon Verriet traced the ups and downs of the haybox from around 1895 to the present day. It was most popular in times of war, but always with a moral element to it, even if the moral lesson shifted slightly. Notes There’s a terrific account of The Self-acting Norwegian Cooking Apparatus in the New York Medical Journal, vol 10 (1870). Do not be distracted by either the preceding item (The Effects of Hashish) or the one after (When to Trephine). Thanks to Hedon for the link. The most recent incarnation of the haybox is the Wonderbag, created by a development worker after a restless night and now offering to save the planet and pull people out of poverty. Aside from that, most of the online writing about the haybox is survivalist stuff. I’m not linking to that. The banner image is from Ford Madox Brown’s The Hayfield. I’d like to think that his supper is under one of the little haystacks. The cover illustration is from The Fireless Cook Book, by Margaret J. Mitchell.

Jam tomorrow?

Jam tomorrow?

by @ Eat This Podcast

What is jam? “A preserve made from whole fruit boiled to a pulp with sugar.” Lots of opportunities to quibble with that, most especially, if you’re planning to sell the stuff in the UK and label it “jam,” the precise amount of sugar. More than 60% and you’re fine calling it jam. Less than 50% and you need to call it reduced-sugar jam. Lower still, and it becomes a fruit spread. All that is about to change though, thanks to a UK Goverment regulation that will allow products with less than 60% sugar to be labelled jam. There’s nothing like a threat to the traditional British way of life to motivate the masses, although as an expat, I had no idea of the kerfuffle this had raised until I read about it on the website of the Campaign for Real Farming. Changing the rules for what is labelled jam may seem like a tempest on a teacake, but it is symptomatic of the growing distance between what were once simple methods of food processing – in this case to preserve it – and the industrial version of a similar product. And making jam at home isn’t that hard. There is, though, the problem of getting it to set properly. I had a little read to remind myself of what Vivien Lloyd called the magic of pectin, and it isn’t simple. Pectin is a long string of a molecule, present in the glue that cements cell walls together. Some fruits have loads of it, others less. The long strings bind together and form a mesh that traps any liquid inside the spaces between the pectin molecules, but they bind together only under specialised conditions. Acid reduces the tendency for pectin molecules to repel one another, while sugar attracts water, and so allows the pectin molecules to come together. And fruits supply acid and and sugar. “Sounds like a cinch,” says Harold McGee … “But as anyone who has tried knows, it’s anything but a cinch. Making preserves is a tricky business because the necessary balance between pectin, acid, and sugar is a very delicate one. Food scientists have found that a pH between 2.8 and 3.4, a pectin concentration of 0.5 to 1.0%, and a sugar concentration of 60 to 65% are generally optimal, but you would have to be cooking in a well-equipped laboratory to measure the first two condition (sugar content is easily measure by boiling point).” That’s one reason I asked Vivien Lloyd to share her recipe for raspberry jam, which she kindly did. Download the recipe for Raspberry and Vanilla Jam. Notes More science of pectin. Photo of Vivien Lloyd by Robert Walster. Music – in and out – was, of course, Strawberry Jam, by Michelle Shocked. And no, I don’t understand what she’s been saying lately; this is not an endoresement of any kind, it is just good music. I make good jam.

Back to the mountains of Pamir

Back to the mountains of Pamir

by @ Eat This Podcast

In 2007, Frederik van Oudenhoven travelled to the Pamir mountains in Central Asia to document what remained of the region’s rich agricultural biodiversity. Almost 100 years before, the great Russian botanist Nikolai Vavilov became convinced that this was where “the original evolution of many cultivated plants took place.” Soft club wheat, with its short ears, rye, barley, oil plants, grain legumes like chickpeas and lentils, melons and many fruits and vegetables; all showed the kind of diversity that Vavilov said pointed to the places where they were first domesticated. As he wrote, “it is still possible to observe the almost imperceptible transition from wild to cultivated forms within the area.” What van Oudenhoven found was bewildering; incomprehensible diversity in the fields and unspeakably dull food on his plate. It only started to make sense when he began to talk to Pamiri people, and especially the older women, about their food and culture. The result was a book – With Our Own Hands: a celebration of food and life in the Pamir Mountains of Tajikistan and Afghanistan – by van Oudenhoven and his co-author Jamila Haider, which documents a culture that remains in danger of disappearing. That book recently won the Gourmand International award for Best Cookbook of 2015, which is why I am now repeating the conversation I had with Frederik van Oudenhoven in July of last year. Notes With Our Own Hands is published by LM Publishers and is available from them and other booksellers. For other notes, see the original episode notes. There are plans to make a documentary about the people and their culture. Watch a trailer here.

Little bits of 2017: Part III

Little bits of 2017: Part III

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Jaan Altosaar on his practical approach to food

In praise of meat, milk and eggs

In praise of meat, milk and eggs

by @ Eat This Podcast

Giving up on animals as a source of food is a luxury that many people cannot afford. For poor people in developing countries, a bit of animal source food can greatly improve their health and wellbeing.

TOP 5 REASONS TO VISIT HO CHI MINH CITY DURING TET

by Brinda Shah @ XO Tours Blog

Lunar New Year, or more commonly known as Tet, is a wondrous and prosperous time in Vietnam, and is an event that is anticipated throughout the year!  It marks the arrival of spring, a brand new start for many of life’s endeavours, and is a time to appreciate and spend time with family.  If you…

Vacancy RUAF Foundation

by F&BKP Office @ Food & Business Knowledge Platform

RUAF Foundation is looking for a young consultant with work experience in urban food systems, urban agriculture, and policy and/or circular economy in the context of sustainable urban development. Duration of the contract is one year, starting February 1, 2018. Deadline for applications is January 10, 2018 »

The post Vacancy RUAF Foundation appeared first on Food & Business Knowledge Platform.

Pecans and history

Pecans and history

by @ Eat This Podcast

The Guadalupe River that flows through Texas used to be known as The River of Nuts, a fact that Wikipedia does not confirm. The nut in question is the pecan, Carya illinoinensis, and the pecan tree is the state tree of Texas. The groves of wild pecans that lined the rivers of Texas are, however, threatened by the very popularity of the nuts they bear, and in particular by the fickle global nut market. The Chinese, you see, have gone nuts for pecans, increasing their purchase of American pecans from 3–4% in 2006 to 30–40% today. And if they abandon the pecan as quickly as they took it up, the wild pecan groves might be abandoned too. All this, and much more, I learned from James McWilliams, professor of history at Texas State University. His new book is one of those delights that looks at the global sweep of human endeavour through a little lens, in this case the pecan. Why it was the Chinese, rather than the French, the English or some other country, that chose to absorb the pecan surplus, I guess we’ll never know. McWilliams told me that Chinese people he spoke to believe the nuts prolong life; irrational as that may seem, no American grower is going to say they don’t. And while the high prices are good news for growers, they’re not so good for people who want pecan-containing industrial food. Notes James McWilliams’ book is The Pecan: a history of America’s native nut. There’s an extract in Texas Monthly online. iTunes artwork photo by Melanie McDermott Outro music Pecan Pie by Golden Smog.

My Village Show – Làng Tôi

by Stephen @ Vietnam Vacation

My Village Show is a lively mosaic where the ancient Vietnamese village life is painted in contemporary stage language with enchanting folk melodies. Fishing, farming, traditional games, or family gathering are rendered with graceful stroke by wonderous acrobatics...

The post My Village Show – Làng Tôi appeared first on Vietnam Vacation.

Eat This Newsletter 067

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Reality check with some Thanksgiving leftovers: herring scandal, Native American non-trend, Britain and food history, smash history, celery and dull spices.

Neovia Vietnam Officially Launches New Innovative And Intensive Shrimp Farming Project – BIOSIPEC

by Vu Nguyen @ Neovia Vietnam

On September 22nd 2017, at its Research and Development center, Neovia Vietnam officially launches a new project on innovative and intensive shrimp farming with the presence of Mr. Hubert de Roquefeuil – CEO of Neovia, key customers as well as strategic partners of Company. BIOSIPEC project is a tool from Neovia to develop an innovative … Continue reading Neovia Vietnam Officially Launches New Innovative And Intensive Shrimp Farming Project – BIOSIPEC

Vietnam Urged To Enlist Public in Food Safety Campaign

by News Desk @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

Vietnam last year recorded 142 incidents of food poisoning, causing 25 deaths and sending more than 3,560 people to the hospital, the English-language Viet Nam News reports. The newspaper reported on a workshop last week where Vietnam’s food safety was debated with the possibility of the government opening up much more information to the public.... Continue Reading

Chewing the fat about chewing the fat

Chewing the fat about chewing the fat

by @ Eat This Podcast

Karima Moyer-Nocchi is an American woman who teaches at the University of Siena. When she had been here almost 25 years she developed something of an obsession. On the one hand, she watched “a bewildering decline in the quality and craftsmanship of Italian food together with a skyrocketing deification of it”. On the other, “in a vicious circle, the decline stimulated the explosion of the gastronomic nostaliga industry, which in turn, hastened the very process it claimed to quell”. This is not something you would notice. The modern idea is that Italian cuisine has always been more-or-less what it is, and that if there were a difference between social classes, it was more about how often they ate certain dishes, or the quality of the ingredients, than about what they actually ate. As Karima Moyer-Nocchi discovered, that rose-tinted view is at odds with what actually went on. In an attempt to make sense of the changes, Moyer-Nocchi turned to women, now aged 90 and more, who had grown up under fascism and who, perhaps, could shed light on the recent history of Italian food. She gently coaxed their memories of food from them, and created a book that is part oral history, part academic history, and that puts the current mania for Italian cuisine in perspective. There’s no way we could cover it all in one interview, but I think you can get some idea of how things have changed, mostly for the better, and also how little one knows about the real history of food in Italy. Notes The book is Chewing the Fat: An Oral History of Italian Foodways from Fascism to Dolce Vita, and in the interests of full disclosure, I should mention that if you follow that link straight to Amazon and buy it, I get a teeny reward. The banner image, from a photograph by Henri Roger-Viollet (I think), shows Mussolini taking part in the first wheat threshing in Latina in 1932, a temporary victory in the Battle for Wheat. The podcast cover image is from a photograph by Mario Giacomelli. In another episode about food in Fascist Italy, I talked to Ruth Lo about the festa dell’uva    Huffduff it

More on Greek Pasticcio

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Prompted by Corfiote food, more about pasticcio http://www.aglaiakremezi.com/original-19c-pasticcio-syros/

Khảo sát Gallup International: Việt Nam xếp thứ hạng cao về hy vọng và hạnh phúc

by indochinaresearch @ Indochina Research

Read full article on Nhip Cau Dau Tu newspaper : http://nhipcaudautu.vn/thi-truong/kinh-te/khao-sat-gallup-international-viet-nam-xep-thu-hang-cao-ve-hy-vong-va-hanh-phuc-3321937/          

The post Khảo sát Gallup International: Việt Nam xếp thứ hạng cao về hy vọng và hạnh phúc appeared first on Indochina Research.

GS1 Traceability For Food Safety In Viet Nam

by Tran Dang Khoa @ GS1 Vietnam

Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi City is two largest foodstuffs markets in the country. Prior to the problem of food unsafety, the cities have taken some management actions to...

The post GS1 Traceability For Food Safety In Viet Nam appeared first on GS1 Vietnam.

Unladylike Drinking in Vietnam

by Julia Solervicens @ HOTTABLE

We spoke with a group of five twenty-something-year-old Vietnamese women, of whom some drank and some didn’t, to get some more personal insights.

The post Unladylike Drinking in Vietnam appeared first on HOTTABLE.

Vietnam – New Penal Code provides stricter sanctions for food safety violations

Vietnam – New Penal Code provides stricter sanctions for food safety violations


FOOD LAW LATEST

“According to Vietnam’s amended Penal Code which took effect on Jan. 1, the slightest penalty for filthy food producers or traders is a fine of 50-200 million Vietnamese dong (2,200-8,8…

Getting Around in Hue, Vietnam

by Phuc Nguyen @ The Christina's Blog

Hue is the famous Imperial city of Central Vietnam, the throne of the Nguyen Dynasty from 1802 to 1945. Old and tranquil, Hue is frozen in time, standing amongst the remnants of a once glorious Asian empire. Because of this, getting around Hue is intriguing with many options available, and sights to see. A major […]

The post Getting Around in Hue, Vietnam appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

U.S. importer expands recall of Swai fillets from Vietnam

by News Desk @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

A California company has added more than a ton of fish from Vietnam to its ongoing recall, bringing the amount of individually frozen Swai fillets now subject to recall to almost 28,000 pounds. The Santa Anna, CA, company — U.S. Cato Holdings Inc. — distributed the newly recalled 2,235 pounds of imported fish to retailers... Continue Reading

Eat This Newsletter 069

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

From weight loss tools to obesogenic food swamps and everything in-between.

Vietnam, World Bank and the Netherlands to cooperate on food safety

Vietnam, World Bank and the Netherlands to cooperate on food safety


Netherlands for the World Bank

Attached a picture of Ousmane Dione and Nathan together with the Prime Ministers Phuc of Vietnam and Rutte of the Netherlands this Monday at the Catshuis (local equivalent of the White House) in Th…

100% food insecure: poor people in a rich country

100% food insecure: poor people in a rich country

by @ Eat This Podcast

The O-Pipin-Na-Piwin Cree Nation have suffered generations of maltreatment at the hands of various official entities. Moved from their homelands further south, they now occupy small scattered settlements in northern Manitoba, where summers are short and the land infertile. Having adapted to some extent to their new circumstances, large dams, built to supply energy to the rest of the province and beyond, flooded their traditional fishing and hunting grounds, destroying their livelihoods even further. Being so remote, the supply chain for outside foods is tenuous and expensive, with prices way beyond those found further south. No wonder, then, that the people are suffering an epidemic of malnutrition and its attendant diseases. But after years of maltreatment, the people are starting to reclaim their foodways and learning new ways to feed themselves sustainably. Andi Sharma, a policy analyst with the Northern Healthy Foods Initiative, told me about the problems and some of the incipient solutions. Notes The banner image is part of a very early map of the area now occupied by the indigenous people and Manitoba Hydro. The Northern Healthy Foods Initiative is trying to improve food security in a variety of ways. I didn’t spend much time following up on Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission, but I’m struck by the historical similarities between Canada and Australia, and, again, by the power of food as a political weapon.

Art in the lab: ‘Colourful’ bacteria in traditional Zambian products

by GCP-1 @ Food & Business Knowledge Platform

Anneloes Groenenboom is a PhD student in the Laboratory of Genetics, Wageningen University and involved in the NWO Global Challenges Programme (GCP) project called “Zambian traditional fermented foods”.  She has written this Story of change following the GCP training on November 1, 2017, facilitated by Perspectivity. Art in the lab Research with microbes usually does not »

The post Art in the lab: ‘Colourful’ bacteria in traditional Zambian products appeared first on Food & Business Knowledge Platform.

Feeding people is easy

Feeding people is easy

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

First let's decide what kind of food supply system we want, then use that to bring about a renaissance in real farming.

Conquering Mount Fansipan the Right Way (Tallest Mountain in Vietnam)

by Anna Suszynski @ The Christina's Blog

Mount Fansipan is the highest mountain in Vietnam and Indochina peninsula, located in the Hoang Lien Son mountain range. It was once only visited by adventure seekers fit enough to make the strenuous hike, but now this mountain offers a few different experiences for all types of travelers. Regardless of the new tram that brings […]

The post Conquering Mount Fansipan the Right Way (Tallest Mountain in Vietnam) appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

Eat This Newsletter 043

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

"Essential" knives and two takes each on fish farms and proxies for food quality.

When is a zucchini not a zucchini?

When is a zucchini not a zucchini?

by @ Eat This Podcast

A story of exploration, aristocracy and promiscuity, all in the service of better food. What more could you want?

Strengthening Agri-Food Product Barcode-based Traceability In The GMS Region Stakeholders Consultation

by Tran Dang Khoa @ GS1 Vietnam

On 18th January 2018, the national consultation meeting was held with the aim of identifying a typical value chain, identifying the need and desirability of implementing GS1 traceability system, identifying...

The post Strengthening Agri-Food Product Barcode-based Traceability In The GMS Region Stakeholders Consultation appeared first on GS1 Vietnam.

Company recalls lizard fish amidst unresolved FDA warning

by News Desk @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

A Brooklyn, NY, fish company that has an unresolved warning letter from FDA because of food safety problems at its facility is recalling lizard fish because it may be contaminated with the bacteria that causes botulism poisoning. Arcadia Trading Inc. is recalling 34 cartons of lizard fish imported from Vietnam that was distributed nationwide to... Continue Reading

Eat This Newsletter 045

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Thin gruel this week, I’m afraid, not least because I spent three days last week in the belly of the beast at FAO in Rome, at the International Symposium on Sustainable Food Systems for Healthy Diets and Improved Nutrition. More on that later, maybe.

Briefly: Sliced not so nice — NY grade cards — Recall failure

by News Desk @ Food Safety News

Every hour of every day people around the world are living with and working to resolve food safety issues. Here is a sampling of current headlines for your consumption, brought to you today with the support of Alchemy Systems. Researchers say pre-sliced vegetables are pathogen repositories Research published this month concludes pre-sliced vegetables should be considered... Continue Reading

A novel approach to food security

A novel approach to food security

by @ Eat This Podcast

It is so easy to forget that very few people know anything about plant breeding and how vital it is to having enough to eat. The time it takes, and the resources it needs -- financial, genetic, human -- are just not something most people know about. No wonder, then, that many people don't quite grasp the urgency with which we need to get cracking now to breed crops adapted to predicted climate conditions. Susan Dworkin's new book The Commons sidesteps that by hurling us 150 years into the future, to a world in which the failure to respond almost doomed our species to extinction. I thought it might be fun to talk to Susan and she agreed, but first I had to read the book. It turned out to be a rollicking good read, full of interesting characters and strange plot twists. All our old familiar friends are there. Large parts of the world have become very inhospitable, thanks to climate change. There's an all-knowing Corporation that owns just about everything, including 85% of all humans in its domain. And the humans are shareholders in the whole enterprise. It all seems rather wonderful, except that there's a problem: a new stem rust of wheat threatens a reprise of the famines and hardship of 100 years before. To say much more would be to give too much away. Let's just say that the search for a solution is what drives the story forward. Of course, I'm not the intended audience, so I have absolutely no idea how The Commons will be received by anyone else. I'm not even sure what the author would like us to be doing now to avoid the future she depicts. That was just one of the topics we talked about in a discussion that could have gone on a lot longer. Notes The Commons is available from Amazon as an e-book and a paperback. If you are in the Washington DC area on 24 October, Susan Dworkin will be lecturing on "The Weather in the Supermarket: Climate Change, Seed Banks and Tomorrow's Food" at the US Botanic Garden. I "borrowed" the music -- Mavis Staples singing Hard Times Come Again No More -- from Beautiful Dreamer, a wonderful tribute album to Stephen Foster. Buy it if you don't already have it (and if you like that kind of thing). The banner photograph is my own.

Pea protein on his face

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

I admit, I’m taking pleasure in the continuing exposure of Josh Tetrick and Hampton Creek Foods. Bloomberg Business Week continues its exposé.

Vietnam is 5th happiest population in EOY 2017

by indochinaresearch @ Indochina Research

Among 55 countries polled, Vietnam population is the 5th happiest, 2nd only in ASEAN to the Philippines and ahead of Indonesia ! Full results : http://www.gallup-international.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/2017_Happiness_Hope_Economic-Optimism.pdf    Methodology: The Gallup International End of Year Survey (EoY) is an annual tradition initiated by and designed under the chairmanship of Dr. George Gallup in 1977. It is conducted […]

The post Vietnam is 5th happiest population in EOY 2017 appeared first on Indochina Research.

GFSF-CCIC PARTNERSHIP

by admin2 @ Global Food Safety Forum

GFSF-CCIC PARTNERSHIP GFSF (www.globalfoodsafetyforum.org ) and CCIC (http://www.ccic.com/web/static/catalogs/catalog_english/english.html) are proud to announce their collaboration for future food safety activities. Our collaboration will focus on activities underway in China for 2017-2018. CCIC is a leading inspection, certification, and testing service provider. Their inspection services include pre-shipment and consumer product inspection; certification services include product, management and […]

Is Veganism Growing in Vietnam?

by Gerry Flynn @ HOTTABLE

"Five years ago, I was not proud to say, 'I’m a vegetarian' and people would look at me like, “What’s wrong with you?” but now people understand more."

The post Is Veganism Growing in Vietnam? appeared first on HOTTABLE.

Navajo people too know what’s good for them

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Science continues to be astonished that traditional foodways are actually good for the people who evolved them.

The military-culinary complex

The military-culinary complex

by @ Eat This Podcast

Have you ever stopped to wonder what drives the incessant innovation in processed food? Who thought that an energy bar would be a good thing to exist? What was the logic that drove the development of the cheese-flavoured powder that coats so many snacks? Even instant coffee; why was that needed? The answer to all these questions, and many more, can be traced back to the US Army’s Natick Center, outside Boston, Massachusetts. That is where the Combat Feeding Directorate of the US army, with the help of academics and large food processing companies, designs the rations that sustain American soldiers and much of the rest of America and the world. Soldiers need rations that are lightweight, that don’t spoil over time, and that can withstand some pretty brutal handling. The rest of us pay for the same. Author Anastacia Marx de Selcado’s book Combat-Ready Kitchen, published in early August, lifts the lid on how the army has invaded almost all aspects of processed food. Notes Combat-Ready Kitchen is available from Amazon and elsewhere. If you buy from that link, I get a tiny pittance. Anastacia Marx de Selcado has a website, of course. The banner photograph shows a high pressure processing production line, © Moira Mac.

A year of cooking almost everything from scratch

A year of cooking almost everything from scratch

by @ Eat This Podcast

Megan Kimble -- that's her on the left -- is a young journalist in Tucson, Arizona. Back in 2012, she set out to stick it to the processed food man, by eating only unprocessed food for a year. Her book Unprocessed: My City-Dwelling Year of Reclaiming Real Food tells the whole story. It's odd that two books that have at their core the prevalence of processed food came out within a month of one another, but while Anastacia Marx de Selcado explains how it is that the US military came to occupy supermarket shelves, Megan Kimble simply wants nothing to do with processed foods. Her reasons boil down to taking control of what she eats and boosting the local economy. Along the way she discovers she can't really do without chocolate, so she learns to make her own. Notes Megan Kimble has a website.

Welcome to the Wonderbag

Welcome to the Wonderbag

by @ Eat This Podcast

At this year’s Amsterdam Symposium on the History of Food I talked to Jon Verriet, who’s been researching the history of the haybox. That’s an insulated container, into which you put hot food, which then keeps cooking thanks to the retained heat. Jon made the point that hayboxes often see an upsurge during times of war and hardship, when they can be promoted as good for the country because they save energy and money. Environmentally-aware types also like them, to save energy as they cook their lentils. Researching the haybox myself, I came across its modern incarnation, the Wonderbag, which neatly ties those two motivations together. When you buy one, perhaps for environmental reasons, you’re actually paying for two, one of which goes to a poor family to save money, fuel, time, water, everything. I thought that was worth a follow-up, and so sought out Sarah Collins, a South African social entrepreneur who developed the Wonderbag. Notes The Wonderbag website tells the story and links through to the Wonderbag Foundation. The University of California at Berkeley study mentioned in the podcast concluded that the Wonderbag saves 8–21% of the time family members spend cooking, 10–36% of fuel costs, and allows families to spend 36–60% more on food. Banner photograph thanks to Annie Templeton at Goedgedacht Trust. Cover photo by Edrea du Toit for Netwerk 24. The haybox through history episode, for convenience.    Huffduff it

Air-cured sausages

Air-cured sausages

by @ Eat This Podcast

Among the more miraculous edible transformations is the one that turns raw meat, salt and a few basic spices into some of the most delicious foods around. Time was when curing meat, especially stuffed into a casing to make a sausage, was the only way both to use every part of an animal and to help make it last longer than raw meat. Done right, a sausage would stay good to the next slaughtering season and beyond. The process relied on the skill of the sausage-maker, the help of beneficial bacteria and moulds, the right conditions, a great deal of patience, and sometimes luck. Luck is less of a factor now, because to keep up with demand the vast majority of cured meats are produced in artificial conditions of controlled precision. Here and there, though, the old ways survive. Jan Davison spent months touring the sausage high-spots of Europe looking for the genuine article, and shared some of her favourites at the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cooking last year. The Sausages Mortadella di Camaiore, from the Triglia family in Camaiore, Italy. Corallina di Norcia, from I Fratelli Ansuini (The Pig Brothers? Surely not.) in Norcia, Italy. Finocchiona di Suino Grigio, from Sergio Falaschi in San Miniato, Italy. I think the Suino Grigio is a cross between the Large White and the fabled Cinta Senese, which almost did for the latter. Salchichón de Vic from Casa Riera Ordeix, in Vic, Spain. The chorizo Jan mentioned in the interview we did not taste. She sent her notes: Lomo iberico bellota – Señorio de Montana, Spain. Along with ham, lomo, cured loin of pork is the highest expression of the curer’s art; especially when it is made from Spain’s indigenous black pig, the Iberico, fattened on bellota – acorns. The loin, left as a single roll of meat almost a metre in length,  is seasoned almost imperceptibly with pimentón, (a spicy type of paprika), sea salt, fresh garlic and oregano, before being stuffed into a gut and left to cure slowly over several months. Lomo Ibérico bellota is a cured sausage is to be savoured … slowly; the lomo melts in the mouth releasing complex, nutty flavours. Ahle Wurscht, from Thomas Koch in Calden, Germany. There's a video of Ahle Wurscht being made, which I had subtitled, but WordPress does not yet permit embedding videos from Universal Subtitles, so you'll have to just click the link. That video is not from Thomas Koch, although he does have some videos on his site. Notes Jan Davison is writing a book on English Sausages for The English Kitchen series at Prospect Books. All being well it will be published in 2014. Food safety agencies have been very wary about meat cured in restaurants and at home, sometimes with justification. But there really is nothing to be scared of if you take reasonable precautions. A great place to start is at Michael Ruhlman’s blog, and one of his excellent books. I haven’t done so myself, but everyone says Ruhlman is the boss. I am completely indebted to Ellen Pilsworth for translating the German video. Thanks Ellie. Intro music by Dan-O at DanoSongs.com. Final music by The Bavarian Oompah Boys.

GFSF Welcomes Vietnamese Food Safety Delegation

by admin2 @ Global Food Safety Forum

Source: Food Online, March 17, 2017 GFSF is pleased to welcome a food safety delegation from Vietnam as the first step in launching a new franchise in Vietnam. Their visit — March 18-25 — is under sponsorship of the High Quality Vietnamese Goods Business Association. Meetings include CFSAN/FDA, APHIS, Hill Committees, and other international affairs […]

Tulip bulb soup

Tulip bulb soup

by @ Eat This Podcast

As ever, I’m taking a little break and bringing you some repeats from 2015. This one is prompted by an episode of NPR’s Planet Money that I’ve just listened to. They decided to cook a peacock for reasons that I think had something to do with the role of spices in global trade and the birth of capitalism in the 17th century. And who should they call on as their expert guide but Christianne Muusers. Long time listeners may remember that it was almost a year ago that I met Christianne at the 2nd annual Amsterdam Symposium on the History of Food. We talked about the very antithesis of conspicuous consumption represented by a heavily-spiced peacock pie: tulip bulb soup, which kept some Dutch people alive through the hunger winter of 1943–44. The Amsterdam Food Symposium takes place again next week, on 15 and 16 January 2016. Unfortunately I really don’t think I can afford to go this year, which is a great shame. Notes Details of the Symposium here. Christianne Muusers’ site is called Coquinaria and there’s some more information on tulip bulbs as food from Green Deane. The tulip in the photo is China Pink, and I took it. The banner photo shows some Dutch ration coupons, from Wikimedia. Thanks for the inspiration to Planet Money’s We cooked a peacock, especially if it brings in a few listeners.

In praise of meat, milk and eggs

In praise of meat, milk and eggs

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Giving up on animals as a source of food is a luxury that many people cannot afford. For poor people in developing countries, a bit of animal source food can greatly improve their health and wellbeing.

Vietnam launches report on better managing risks to food safety

Vietnam launches report on better managing risks to food safety


ILRI news

A report launched this week on managing risks to food safety in Vietnam was prepared by the World Bank and other research and development partners at the request of the Government of Vietnam. The I…

Little bits of 2017: Part III

Little bits of 2017: Part III

by @ Eat This Podcast

Jaan Altosaar on his practical approach to food

MoH proposes reducing food safety red tape

MoH proposes reducing food safety red tape


vietnamnews.vn

The Ministry of Health has proposed to the Government to reduce or simplify the number of administrative procedures in food safety management.

The Quintessence of Tonkin Show

by Stephen @ Vietnam Vacation

A totally new entertainment show has emerged! The Quintessence of Tonkin is deep experiences of live performances by locals, traditional Vietnamese music, water-light show and daily stories. If you have [...]

The post The Quintessence of Tonkin Show appeared first on Vietnam Vacation.

GLOBAL FOOD SAFETY EVENT CALENDAR

by admin2 @ Global Food Safety Forum

  11th FoodHACCP Food Safety Conference November 15 – 16, 2017, Las Vegas, Nevada 2017 Food Safety Consortium November 28 – December 1, 2017, Schaumburg, Illinois 20th International Conference on Food Safety and Packaging Technologies  January 29 – 30, 2018, Sydney, Australia GFSI Global Food Safety Conference March 5 – 8, 2018, Tokyo, Japan Food Ingredients China March 22- […]

Just Mayo and justice

Just Mayo and justice

by @ Eat This Podcast

It’s hard to know what this episode is really about. Government bullying private enterprise? An evil conspiracy to crush a competitor? Confused consumers unable to read a label? All of the above? In a nutshell, on 12 August 2015 the US Food and Drug Administration sent a warning letter to Josh Tetrick, CEO of Hampton Creek Foods, informing him that two of Hampton Creek’s products: are in violation of section 403 of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the Act) [21 U.S.C. § 343] and its implementing regulations found in Title 21, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 101 (21 CFR 101). Just Mayo and Just Mayo Sriracha are the two products, and their crime is that they do not contain eggs. So they cannot be called “mayo”. Who sicced the FDA on Hampton Creek? has become the big question, as a pile of emails winkled out of the government by a Freedom of Information Act request seem to show that the American Egg Board orchestrated a campaign against Hampton Creek. I mentioned the story in my newsletter three weeks ago, which prompted Peter Hertzmann, an independent researcher and a friend, to suggest that the reality, as ever, is not quite so straightforward. Peter was good enough to fill me in on some of the background. Notes Peter Hertzmann’s website is well worth exploring for all sorts of good things. The American Egg Board is just one of several commodity checkoff programs. There have been some very interesting challenges to the whole idea of a mandatory checkoff, one of which recently featured on BackStory, a history podcast. I did ask if I could use it, but no reply yet; you can hear the segment here, but you will need a sharper legal brain than mine to decide whether mandatory funding of something called government speech raises First Amendment concerns. What got Peter and me into the sciencey discussion of mayonnaise and emulsions was his mention of the Harvard University Science and Cooking lecture series. I’m mortified to admit that I didn’t know about it. Many of the lectures are on YouTube, and one in particular that Peter pointed me to showed Nandu Jubany from Can Jubany restaurant in Spain making an aioli from nothing but garlic, salt and olive oil, and a bit of water. You can see him do that from about 13:30 to 17:30 in this video, but the intro, on emulsions, is worth watching too if you want to a better understanding. I’m sharing, without comment, some of the AEB material obtained by Ryan Shapiro. The FDA’s letter is, of course, online. The banner image of a mayonnaise emulsion under the microscope is from a scientific paper on substituting eggs with a modified potato starch.

Eat This Newsletter 64

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

On the links between land reform and prosperity, the origins of a sandwich, the Amish and Whole Foods and more.

Crackers about Indonesian food

Crackers about Indonesian food

by @ Eat This Podcast

I'm on what the real professionals call a mission, or, failing that, duty travel. And once again I've bitten off more than I can chew. So, rather than admit defeat and just leave well enough alone, I decide to record a little reflection on the food of Indonesia, at least, the food I've eaten so far, halfway into the trip. I forgot to mention durian. I guess that tells you all you need to know about how little of an impression it made. Yes, it smells. Yes, the taste and texture are odd. It wasn't that bad, but I certainly won't be packing one in coffee grounds and triple-wrapping it to bring it back with me, as one colleague advised.    Huffduff it

Seafood processor nets FDA warning for lack of hazard plan  

by Kelsey M. Mackin @ Food Safety News

A seafood processor in Indonesia is on notice from the Food and Drug Administration for serious violations of the seafood Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point (HAACP) regulation. According to the Dec. 29 warning letter recently made public by the FDA, the processor’s frozen vacuum packaged tuna were rendered injurious to health as they were prepared, packed or held under insanitary conditions. Officials from the... Continue Reading

Eat This Newsletter 053

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Easter, and the consequences of climate change for snack-happy Japanese. Plus broccoli, Canada's culinary history and grants for the study of food history.

How to measure what farms produce

How to measure what farms produce

by @ Eat This Podcast

How should we measure what farms produce? The answer drives some pretty important trends. For the past 60 years and more, the key metric has been yield – tonnes per hectare or equivalent. And it has resulted in extraordinary improvements in productivity, at least as measured by yield, and at least for some crops. Over the past 60 years, the productivity of the three major cereals – wheat, rice and maize – has gone up 3.2 times, more than keeping up with the 2.3-times increase in population. And the total production of those three has gone up from 66 per cent of all cereals to 79 percent over the same period. Largely as a result, we no longer see the same large-scale famines that we used to. Yield, however, isn’t everything. Nor are calories, which some people have embraced as a better measure than yield. The world produces enough calories for everyone (ignoring for now the fact that there are problems with distribution) but calories are not enough. As Ruth DeFreis says in the podcast, “If calories were everything, why would we have a billion iron-deficient people?” Ruth and her co-authors have come up with an alternative measure, nutritional yield: “The number of adults who would be able to obtain 100% of their recommended DRI [dietary reference intake] of different nutrients for 1 year from a food item produced annually on one hectare”. To me, this makes intuitive sense. Food – as opposed to, say, biofuel – is for nourishing people, not powering machines. So of course there’s more to it than calories. I’ve tried saying as much to pundits gung-ho for yield or calories, even before I read the paper, but with no great success. So when the topic came up again I jumped at the opportunity to speak to the lead author. Notes Ruth DeFries recently published The Big Ratchet: How Humanity Thrives in the Face of Natural Crisis. Metrics for land-scarce agriculture is in the 17 July 2015 issue of Science. My side of the little rant is at the Agricultural Biodiversity Weblog. The calorie-fans can put their own side up if they’re so minded. A couple of weeks later, my compadre Luigi wrote about the Science paper and added his own views.

FDA sends warning letter to Vietnam over importer’s seafood HACCP

by News Desk @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

Vietnam’s Ba Hai Company Limited received a warning letter dated March 21, 2017 from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) over its fish and fishery products examined at  an importer located in the United States. FDA inspected the Crystal Cove Seafood Corporation in Floral Park, NY last Oct. 13 to assess the importer’s compliance... Continue Reading

Seafood Processors From Around the World Receive FDA Warning Letters

by News Desk @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

Foreign seafood processors in Ecuador, Portugal, Malaysia, Spain and Vietnam have, in the past month or so, have received warning letters from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). All face the possibility of having their fish or fish products detained at the U.S. border without any physical examination unless FDA’s concerns are addressed. And,... Continue Reading

Rice from Randall’s Island, New York

Rice from Randall’s Island, New York

by @ Eat This Podcast

Randall’s Island is a small piece of land just east of 125th Street in New York’s East River. It is also around 2 degrees further south than the northern limit of rice growing on Hokkaido in Japan. What could be more natural, then, than for a community farm on Randall’s Island to have a go at growing rice, a staple that the kids who come to the farm enjoy, but one that they’ve never seen growing? The assistant horticulture manager scored some rice seeds and with advice from her grandmother in Korea set to. They built a miniature paddy, like a flooded raised bed, and managed to harvest about six kilograms of rice. And that’s when their trouble began. Rice is darn difficult to hull and clean. A piece by Rachel Laudan tipped me off to the Randall’s Island rice, and I was excited to discover that the person who origially wrote the story for The New Yorker was Nicola Twilley, a writer whose Edible Geography (and other projects) I have long admired. Luckily for me, she was happy to talk. What intrigued me about the story of hulling rice in the northeastern US, was how it resonated with the plight of subsistence farmers in India, Bolivia and elsewhere. The women in many communities spend hours a day of hard and often dangerous work to prepare the seeds they have grown and harvested. I can’t blame them if they would just as soon sell their back-breaking crop and buy prepared convenience foods, and hang the nutritional consequences. I’ve seen for myself how electrical mini-mills remove this drudgery for women in the Kolli Hills of India, and in so doing boost the consumption of nutritious millets. The same sort of approach, an inexpensive, locally-built machine, has made processing quinoa much easier for farmers on the Altiplano of Bolivia. There’s something fitting about New York rice being treated in a similar way. Notes Edible Geography, Nicola Twilley’s website, is endlessly interesting and entertaining. If you’re into podcasts, don’t miss the great show Roman Mars and 99pi did based on her research into cow tunnels. Rachel Laudan has made something of a specialty of pointing out that growing cereals is the easy part; preparing them for food is what takes hard work and ingenuity. Ecological Rice Farming in the Northeastern USA is not nearly as silly as it may first seem. And for all the details of Don Brill’s rice hullers, you need to head over to Brill Engineering, which sounds a lot grander than an inveterate tinkerer with a basement full of bits and pieces. Daniel Felder, head of research at Momofuku, takes research into fermentation and terroir very seriously. Nicola has written about that too. Photo of Don Brill and a volunteer rice peddler by Nicola Twilley, as are all the others. Thanks.

Before the Baguette

by Julia Solervicens @ HOTTABLE

An insight into Vietnamese food culture before its famed French influences

The post Before the Baguette appeared first on HOTTABLE.

Food safety in Vietnam: where we are at and what we can learn from international experiences

Food safety in Vietnam: where we are at and what we can learn from international experiences


PubMed Central (PMC)

Food-borne diseases are attracting a lot of attention in Vietnam as a result of repeated episodes of adulterated and unsafe food. In this paper, we provide some perspectives on food safety in Vietnam from the point of view of an international research ...

The festa dell’uva of the 1930s

The festa dell’uva of the 1930s

by @ Eat This Podcast

These days, every little town and village in Italy has its sagra or festa, a weekend, or longer, in celebration of a particular local food. Although they have a whiff of tradition about them, most of these are relatively recent inventions, designed to attract tourists as much as honour the food and cement community relationships. I was surprised to learn, then, that in 1930 Mussolini’s Minister of Agriculture, Arturo Marescalchi, proposed a national celebration of the grape – the festa dell’uva – throughout the peninsula. There were many reasons. A glut of table grapes was certainly one, as the government sought to persuade the public to eat Italian. There were also political motives, celebrating Italy as a young nation and strengthening support for the fascists. The result, for a few glorious years, was an annual spectacle of amazing proportions. In Rome, markets were set up for each region to sell its table grapes, there were processions of outlandish grape-themed floats, and a good time seems to have been had by all. Ruth Lo, a PhD student at Brown University and scholar at the American Academy in Rome has been studying the period and generously agreed to talk to me about her work. Notes Ruth Lo recently presented a paper – Celebrating the festa dell’uva: Grapes and Urban Spectacle in Fascist Rome – at the annual meeting of the Southern Historical Society in Atlanta, Georgia. L’istituto Luce, L’Unione Cinematografica Educativa, was another arm for fascist propaganda. Some of the films Luce made are on YouTube. Two of my favourites, well worth the visit as historical documents, are the celebrations at the Basilica di Massenzio, these days the home of a literary festival, and one from Marino in the Castelli Romani, apparently Marescalchi’s inspiration and still going strong today.

IFC Supports to Improve Food Safety in Vietnam, Enhancing Agribusiness Sustainability - Bel Gà

IFC Supports to Improve Food Safety in Vietnam, Enhancing Agribusiness Sustainability - Bel Gà


Bel Gà

Ho Chi Minh City, July 1, 2017—IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, has signed an advisory agreement with Bel Gà JSC., a leading poultry breeding firm, and launched its Vietnam Food Safety Project that aims to address food safety standards and practices in the country. Improving the quality of food products will help …

Global Food Safety Forum to Tackle Food Safety in Vietnam - Food Industry Asia

Global Food Safety Forum to Tackle Food Safety in Vietnam - Food Industry Asia


Food Industry Asia

FIA partner, the Global Food Safety Forum, has announced its plans for public-private partnership to drive capacity-building and advance food safety in Vietnam.

Going further than food miles

Going further than food miles

by @ Eat This Podcast

“Forget organic. Eat local.” Nice, simple advice, from the cover of Time magazine. But more or less pointless. There’s so much more to food systems than just the distance the food travels. Tim Lang coined the phrase food miles. We talked about the complexities of the food system.

Talking turkey

Talking turkey

by @ Eat This Podcast

As people in North America prepare to give thanks and devour unimaginable quantities of food, we go to the heart of the matter. Why are turkeys called turkeys? In next week's show, more about the American contribution to poultry culture.

Vietnam, World Bank and the Netherlands to cooperate on food safety - Food & Business Knowledge Platform

Vietnam, World Bank and the Netherlands to cooperate on food safety - Food & Business Knowledge Platform


Food & Business Knowledge Platform

In Vietnam, food safety is of great and increasing importance to consumers and policymakers alike. The Government of Vietnam will intensify its collaboration with the World Bank and the Netherlands in assessing and addressing food safety risks. Prime Minister Phuc of Vietnam signed a Memorandum with Dutch Prime Minister Rutte and WBG’s Country Director for Vietnam. »

Fifth quarter: Rachel Roddy’s Rome

Fifth quarter: Rachel Roddy’s Rome

by @ Eat This Podcast

That sink is where Rachel Roddy, an English woman in Rome, prepares meals to share with her partner Vincenzo, their young son Luca, and a horde of appreciative readers of her website and, now, her first book. Five Quarters: Recipes and Notes from a Kitchen in Rome, features the sink on its front cover. That probably makes it one of the most famous sinks in Rome. So naturally when Rachel and I got home from our meeting in the new Testaccio market, it was the first thing I wanted to see. And photograph. Our conversation ranged widely, from book titles and domain names to the links between the food of Rome and the food of Manchester. And although she says she's a romantic and prone to nostalgia, it is also clearly the case that Rachel Roddy loves learning about food and cooking, loves sharing what she's learned, and loves telling stories. Simple ingredients, for a satisfying cookbook and website. A couple of other links. Rachel mentioned her friend Fabrizia Lanza and the farm and cooking school she runs in Sicily. Here's what Rachel wrote recently about a wonderful idea called Cook the Farm. If you decide to follow the link, do give yourself time to pursue Rachel down all her intriguing rabbit holes.

Vietnamese Traditional Costumes

by Stephen @ Vietnam Vacation

Vietnam is a multi ethnic country with 54 distinct groups and each with its own cultural heritage and specific styles of clothing. Common traits often include splendid color, seemingly contradicting [...]

The post Vietnamese Traditional Costumes appeared first on Vietnam Vacation.

Nearly 550 customers of two restaurants sick from norovirus

by Catharine Huddle @ Food Safety News

The number of people sick in a Tacoma, WA-area norovirus outbreak hit 542 this week, increasing by almost 40 percent since Jan. 11. Norovirus has been confirmed by Tacoma-Pierce County Health Department officials as the pathogen responsible for the outbreak. Of the 542 reported victims, 520 ate at an El Toro restaurant in Tacoma. Another... Continue Reading

World Rhino Day – TRAFFIC briefing to the media

by indochinaresearch @ Indochina Research

          At the occasion of the World Rhino day, TRAFFIC released its briefing paper to encourage Vietnamese media to become ‘agents of change’ in effort to deter wildlife crime. Indochina Research Vietnam partnered with TRAFFIC to evaluate the impact of their behavior change campaign among influent men in Hanoi and Ho […]

The post World Rhino Day – TRAFFIC briefing to the media appeared first on Indochina Research.

The evolution of food culture in Mali

The evolution of food culture in Mali

by @ Eat This Podcast

When it comes to cradles of agriculture, West Africa does not often get a look in. The Sahel is better known as a place of famine than of feasting, but it wasn’t always so, and even today the Bamana people of Mali have a rich food culture. Stephen Wooten – that’s him in the picture enjoying a meal with his friends and collaborators – is an anthropologist who has been working in Mali since the early 1990s. He gave a great talk at this year’s Amsterdam Symposium on the History of Food, after which we had a chance to talk about food in Mali and how it evolved from gathering and hunting through herding cattle and sheep to settled agriculture, along the way domesticating some important cereals such as millet. There's a lot more to the food culture though. Women and men work separately but together to ensure that the community can eat, with a strict division of labour and equally strict sharing of responsibilities. Notes The banner photograph, by Stephen Wooten, shows the antelope headdress worn by dancers in the Ciwara performance, a celebration that recounts the mythical origins of Bamana agriculture and that, like Bamana food culture, requires the participation of women and men.    Huffduff it

The True Father of the First Green Revolution

The True Father of the First Green Revolution

by @ Eat This Podcast

Today’s show is something of a departure; I’m talking about someone who is crucial to global food security and yet who is almost unknown. It’s true, as Jean-Henri Fabre, the French naturalist wrote, that “History ... knows the names of the king's bastards but cannot tell us the origin of wheat.” Most people are blissfully unaware of the men and women who created the plant varieties that keep us fed. I say as much at the beginning of the show, when I guess that perhaps one in a hundred people can name a plant breeder, and that the name they’re most likely to come up with is that of Norman Borlaug. (The true stats, from a very small, self-selected sample, are somewhat different. Two out of 13 – about 15% – can name a plant breeder, although neither of the names they came up with was Borlaug’s.) I thought Borlaug might be the most familiar plant breeder because he is credited as being the Father of the Green Revolution, for work that won a Nobel Peace Prize in 1970. Nazareno Strampelli, an Italian plant breeder, exactly foreshadowed Borlaug’s work by about four decades. His wheats doubled production in Italy and beyond and were crucial to the second green revolution ushered in by Borlaug. He was born on 29 May 1866, 150 years ago as I write this. He deserves to be better known (as do all plant breeders, actually). Notes There is very little about Strampelli’s life and work in English. I am indebted to Sergio Salvi for his books, articles and time, without which I could not have produced this episode. Music for the show graciously provided by Jon Fuller, aside from bits of soundtrack lifted from archive Italian newsreel. The banner image I grabbed from Ridley Scott’s Gladiator; it’s a little in joke for anyone who does know even a smidgen of the history of wheat. There is so much more to the story of Strampelli and the early days of plant breeding; would you be interested in an e-book?

How to Get Cheap Flights to Vietnam

by Stephen @ Vietnam Vacation

Vietnam has come across to the top of best travel destinations in Vietnam. Vietnam today is a country at peace attracting visitors all over the world for its magnificent landscape, [...]

The post How to Get Cheap Flights to Vietnam appeared first on Vietnam Vacation.

3 reasons you should not book with XO Tours

by XO Tours @ XO Tours Blog

Although we are very proud of the acclaim our tours have received over the years, we realize that they are not suitable for everyone. These are the 3 main reasons we think some guests should not book our tours: If you are looking for a typical food tour – All the dishes and stops on the “Foodie” tour are carefully curated to…

The Best Homestays in Sapa (For An Authentic & Personal Experience)

by Phuong Thuy @ The Christina's Blog

H’mong, Dao, and Giay people speaking English more fluently than Vietnamese, tremendous natural vistas right outside your balcony, an early morning chill with clouds hovering over the mountains, this and more is what you should expect from Sapa! Located on the northern border of Vietnam, Sapa is the only region of the country that has […]

The post The Best Homestays in Sapa (For An Authentic & Personal Experience) appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

Briefly: Vietnam vets — Diaper Duty — Red meat anaphylaxis

by News Desk @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

Every hour of every day people around the world are living with and working to resolve food safety issues. Here is a sampling of current headlines for your consumption, brought to you today with the support of Alchemy Systems. Vietnam vets suffer from rare liver cancer linked raw fish A recent study shows some Vietnam veterans are dying from... Continue Reading

UPDATED: Importer recalls fish from Vietnam that went to Aldi stores

by News Desk @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

Editor’s note on update: A list of specific retail locations that received the recalled product is now available on the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service website. Click here for the list  which may be updated as additional information becomes available. Almost 26,000 pounds of Sea Queen brand Swai fillets from Vietnam are being recalled because they... Continue Reading

It is OK to eat quinoa

It is OK to eat quinoa

by @ Eat This Podcast

Quinoa -- that darling of the health-conscious western consumer -- came in for a lot of flack a few years ago. Skyrocketing prices caused some food activists to claim that the poor quinoa farmers of the high Andean plains in Bolivia and Peru were no longer able to afford their staple food. Every mouthful we ate was taken direct from a hungry peasant. Some people even gave up eating the stuff. Other writers retaliated by saying that high prices were the best thing that ever happened to those poor farmers. And agricultural economists saw an opportunity to prove their worth. The results are in. High prices are indeed good for farmers. And they had no impact on nutrition among either quinoa farmers or those who merely buy it from time to time. If you gave up on quinoa, you can take it up again with a clean conscience. But that's not to say all is perfect. In this episode, the impact of high prices on quinoa farmers, the problems to come and how western consumers can be part of the solution. Notes There’s quite a lot about quinoa’s various ups and downs over at the other place. This is a good place to start. Bellemare, Fajardo-Gonzalez and Gitter’s paper is Foods and Fads: The Welfare Impacts of Rising Quinoa Prices in Peru. Andrew Stevens’ paper is Quinoa Quandary: Cultural Tastes and Nutrition in Peru. Bioversity International has lots of information about Payments for agrobiodiversity conservation services. Lots more from Andean Naturals at their website. The banner photograph I took in Cotacachi, Ecudaor. And the cover image uses a Wikimedia image by Christian Guthier - originally posted to Flickr as Homegrown Quinoa!, CC BY 2.0.

It’s putrid, it’s paleo, and it’s good for you

It’s putrid, it’s paleo, and it’s good for you

by @ Eat This Podcast

John Speth on how food we may consider disgusting is essential for survival in the Arctic, with added disgusting goodness from Paul Rozin.

Selling B2B solutions to Vietnam, TOP 5 challenges

by Robert @ Nordesk – Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam

The post Selling B2B solutions to Vietnam, TOP 5 challenges appeared first on Nordesk - Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam.

Top 10 Karaokesin Sapa

by Stephen @ Vietnam Vacation

Sapa is the home to not only heart-touching natural landscape but also interesting entertaining places alluring a great number of visitors. If you fancy yourself with singing songs, besides amazing [...]

The post Top 10 Karaokesin Sapa appeared first on Vietnam Vacation.

Porphyrio starts in Asia with De Heus Vietnam

by Huyền @ Bel Gà

On July 1st 2017, Porphyrio was present at the launch event of a Food Safety Project which is led by De Heus Vietnam (feed mill), BelGa Vietnam (hatchery) and the IFC (International Finance Corporation). The aim of the project is to support Vietnamese poultry producers implement GLOBALG.A.P. certification towards enhancing food safety and environmental and […]

The post Porphyrio starts in Asia with De Heus Vietnam appeared first on Bel Gà .

That Chicken From Whole Foods Isn’t So Special Any More

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Everyone Is Copying Whole Foods Now (Bloomberg.com) Big poultry and meat producers have absorbed many of the organic grocer’s practices—and become its suppliers. If this article has any impact, I would like to know whether sales fall at Whole Foods or rise elsewhere. Probably neither.

Formaldehyde Detected in Supermarket Fish Imported from Asia

by James Andrews @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

A large number of fish imported from China and Vietnam and sold in at least some U.S. supermarkets contain unnatural levels of formaldehyde, a known carcinogen, according to tests performed and verified by researchers at a North Carolina chemical engineering firm and North Carolina State University. Around 25 percent of all the fish purchased from... Continue Reading

Foie gras

Foie gras

by @ Eat This Podcast

Foie gras offers a fascinating insight into the role of politics in food — which happens to be the subtitle of a new book by Michaela DeSoucey, a sociologist who got caught up in foie gras just before the topic exploded all over the food scene in Chicago.

Do good chocolate

Do good chocolate

by @ Eat This Podcast

The world of fine chocolate has seen some major change in the past few years, much of it focused on the rise of so-called “bean to bar” chocolate made by smallish producers with an eye on the distinctive qualities of different cacao beans. One company that’s been making a name for itself is Original Beans, which markets a package that tells “The story of cacao in four bars” that recently won a silver medal for packaging at the Academy of Chocolate awards in London. Last summer, I was lucky enough to sit down with Sudi Pigott, a consultant to Original Beans, and taste a couple of them. I came away from the interview with half a bar of one we didn’t taste, the Piura Porcelana. Typing the ID code into the Original Beans website took me lickety split to a page all about that chocolate. It’s an intriguing story, the Porcelana variety being characterised by beans that are a lot lighter in colour than most cacao. Porcelana, of which there are said to be 33 genetically different types, was apparently rediscovered by Original Beans in 2007, since when the company has been working with local farmers and NGOs to boost production. But there are some niggles too. It’s strange, for example, to be told: The Piura Porcelana’s origin is located on the foothills of a mountain range reaching above 2000 meters, called the Sierra Piura. The area is part of the xxx biodiversity hotspot, with bears etc. . Much of the original forest has been cut down over the past decades, resulting in changing weather and water supply. Now it is being replanted and restored. xxx biodiversity hotspot? Bears etc? Is somebody still doing fact-checking and research for the copy? Original Beans is good chocolate, no doubt about that, although there’s also been a bit of a to-do in the rarefied world of chocosnobs about who exactly makes Original Beans’ chocolate. The packaging says Made in Switzerland, although the company is headquartered in Amsterdam. CEO and founder Phillip Kauffmann is quite open about it being made by Felchlin, at least when asked, but that information is not widely available. Is that a problem? Not to me. There are people who make chocolate, and people who make things from chocolate, and they’re often not the same people. Apparently at the fine end of the “beans to bar” world that matters. Original Beans does everything except make the bars; I think that’s acceptable. Is the price equally acceptable? I don’t know; what should good chocolate cost? Fair prices for farmers, men and women alike, no child labour, environmental sustainability, conservation, all that … what’s it worth? I’m not the first to ask the question What Is The True Cost of Chocolate? of Original Beans, and the answers given then, in 2009, certainly have a lot of feelgood about them. In truth, though, I don’t think we’re any nearer an answer, and we won’t be until we have independent audits and much more transparency than most businesses could survive. There’s a real dilemma here. Original Beans and many other topnotch chocolate makers can charge what they do in large part because they are making smaller batches. They’re competing with one another, not with the industrial giants. Industrial chocolate really is a rather ghastly business in all sorts of ways, and yet I don’t see the vast majority of its customers switching to more ethical products, and if they did, I don’t see the ethics surviving the onslaught. Notes Original Beans’ local partner in Peru made a video about Piura Porcelana. Here’s another video, of Original Beans’ Phillip Kauffmann talking about Cru Virunga. Most of the world’s chocolate is now grown in Africa, away from the pests and diseases of its home in Latin America. Here’s a long article about its first home in Africa, São Tomé and Príncipe. Oxfam has been running a campaign to persuade industrial chocolate to do better; it may be starting to bite. Intro music by Dan-O at DanoSongs.com. Final music by Cécile Kayirebwa.

Knives: the new bling

Knives: the new bling

by @ Eat This Podcast

Bling, the Urban Dictionary tells me, is an onomatopoeic representation of light bouncing off a diamond. Or a Bob Kramer original hand-made chef’s knife, which goes for $2000 and up. Of course some people might be able to justify spending that kind of cash on what is, after all, one of the key tools of the trade … if your trade happens to be cooking. But my guest today, Peter Hertzmann, says he sees lots of knives, maybe not quite that expensive, hanging on the wall in people’s kitchens, unused. “Kitchen knives”, he told this year’s Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery, are “the new bling”. Peter teaches knife skills, has written extensively on the topic, and one of the things he is adamant about is that you never chop, you slice. Even if you’re pretty handy with a blade, you can probably learn a thing or two from his video Three Aspects of Knife Skills. I know I did. Notes You can actually get a set of four Bob Kramer knives, plus a steel to ruin them with, for less than $2000. Intro music by Dan-O at DanoSongs.com. Outro music by Martin Simpson. And if I ever knew, I’d forgotten that the song was written by Cat Stevens.

Application open for FoodStars Accelerator

by F&BKP Office @ Food & Business Knowledge Platform

FoodStars is a new alliance to foster innovative start-ups in smart farming in metropolitan areas. The FoodStars Accelerator is designed to accelerate innovative start-ups in a very short time to maximize market opportunity. The Accelerator is now open for applications. »

The post Application open for FoodStars Accelerator appeared first on Food & Business Knowledge Platform.

A little about allotments

A little about allotments

by @ Eat This Podcast

Allotments seem to be a peculiarly British phenomenon. Small parcels of land, divided into smaller still plots, furnished often with a shed and make-shift cold frames, greenhouses and what have you, where, in time-honoured tradition, old men in baggy corduroys and cardigans go to smoke a pipe and gaze out on serried ranks of cabbages, leeks and potatoes. But they are also places where young families are growing their own food, where immigrants are introducing new kinds of fruit and veg, and where people can find a respite from the city. Just recently, they’ve become the backdrop to yet another reality TV “game show”. In that respect, perhaps, like cooking food, growing food may be more of a passive entertainment than an active pastime. Nevertheless, allotments remain in demand. They have a long history, born out of food riots and strife, and in many cases a threatened future as the land they occupy is much more valuable for building plots than for garden plots. Jane Perrone, gardening editor at The Guardian, spilled the beans. Notes Jane Perrone’s book The Allotment Keeper’s Handbook: A Down-to-Earth Guide to Growing Your Own Food is available from Amazon and elsewhere. She also has a blog. James Wong’s Homegrown Revolution is the book Jane Perrone credited with introducing people to new things to grow on their allotments. Banner photo of Stuart Road Allotments modified from one by sarflondondunc. The spade handle, likewise, modified from a picture by Paul Zappaterra-Murphy

Antibiotics in US agriculture going down

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

The Salt, at NPR, asks: Is The Tide Of Antibiotic Use On Farms Now Turning? and gives the lie to my standard view that the answer to any question in a headline is always “No! The Food And Drug Administration released its annual accounting of antibiotics sold in America for use in poultry, pigs and […]

U.S. Makes Top 10 List of Worst Food Safety Violators

by News Desk @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

According to the global food source monitoring company Food Sentry, the U.S. was one of the top 10 countries with the most food safety violations in 2013. In 2013, Food Sentry added more than 3,400 verified instances of food safety violations associated with products exported from 117 different countries. The incident data were gathered from... Continue Reading

The Shelter Collection

by AsiaLIFE @ AsiaLIFE Vietnam

The Shelter Collection was founded in 2004 by Danish national Ole Riis in collaboration with the Danish Vietnamese Association. Father of two adopted Vietnamese children, ...

Food Safety in Vietnam – A Restaurateur’s Opinion

Food Safety in Vietnam – A Restaurateur’s Opinion


HOTTABLE

HOTTABLE spoke to Valhalla Grill’s Jeppe Haugstrup to discuss the issues of food safety in Vietnam.

Lead poisoning of hunters and game

Lead poisoning of hunters and game

by @ Eat This Podcast

This episode of Eat This Podcast is only tangentially about what people eat. At its heart, though, it is about how what people leave behind affects the other animals that eat it. Hunters routinely clean up the animals they’ve shot out in the field. That leaves a gut pile, consisting not only of the guts but also, usually, the heart and lungs and any meat damaged by the bullet. The hunter takes home the meat and scavenger animals get to snack on the gut pile. It's been that way for a long time. Unfortunately, recent research has shown that much of the gut pile, and some of the meat the hunters take home, is contaminated with microscopic pieces of lead. That could be damaging the people who eat the meat, and it has been accused of hampering the recovery of the Californian condor. I heard the story from Matt Podolsky, a wildlife biologist and film maker who worked with the condor recovery programme. That's him (in the hat) with one of the condors; even the size of that tag doesn't give a very good impression of the size of the bird. Notes Matt Podolsky’s film Scavenger Hunt tells the story of the efforts to persuade hunters in Arizona to adopt non-lead ammunition. Not everyone agrees that lead in deer carcasses is the main source of lead in condor blood. Start here. Banner photograph of the Vermillion Cliffs, site of the Arizona condor releases, by Jerry and Pat Donaho. Chef and hunter talk on Nordic Food Lab Radio. Beware, it auto-plays. It is a good thing I don’t have a loaded weapon any time I visit SoundCloud. And if you want to know more about my close encounters with Californian condors, you’ll have to find a copy of my book Zoo 2000 or persuade me to scan and share the relevant pages. I no longer have any copies of the TV shows on which it was based, although there is one on YouTube.

Bog Butter

Bog Butter

by @ Eat This Podcast

Peat diggers in Ireland and elsewhere have occasionally unearthed objects, usually made of wood, that contained some kind of greasy, fatty material with a "distinctive, pungent and slightly offensive smell". Butter. Centuries-old butter. Who buried it, and why, remain mysteries that motivated Ben Reade, an experimental chef at the Nordic Food Lab in Copenhagen, to make some himself. He brought some of his modern-day bog butter, still nestled in moss and wrapped in its birch-bark barrel, to share with the Oxford Symposium on Food and Cookery last year. Notes Ben mentioned two plants that have been found around bog butter, hypnum moss (Hypnum cupressiforme) and bog cotton (Eriophorum angustifolium). The Nordic Food Lab research blog details all of their astonishing edible experiments. I found Seamus Heaney reading his poem Bogland at The Internet Poetry Archive. Caroline Earwood (1997) Bog Butter: A Two Thousand Year History, The Journal of Irish Archaeology, 8: 25-42 is available at JStor, which has a new scheme allowing you to read up to three items at a time online for free. Music by Dan-O at DanoSongs.com. Engage

Canada trade mission highlights need for food safety in Vietnam

Canada trade mission highlights need for food safety in Vietnam


Customs News

Lawrence MacAulay, minister of the Canadian Agriculture and Agri-Food agency, recently concluded a 2-week trade mission he led to Vietnam and India aimed at strengthening and expanding trade relationships in the Asia-Pacific region.

Government, Vietnam Farmers’ Union and Vietnam Women’s Union to sign a joint program on food safety

Government, Vietnam Farmers’ Union and Vietnam Women’s Union to sign a joint program on food safety


Viet Nam Farmer's Union

(VNFU Website) – On November 3rd, The Government, Vietnam Farmers’ Union (VNFU) and Vietnam Women’s Union (VWU) together signed the Joint Program on disseminating, promoting safe product production and business for community’s health, term 2017-2020.

Vietnam – Land of History – 9 Days

by Stephen @ Vietnam Vacation

Day 1: Ho Chi Minh City arrival – Cu Chi Tunnels (D)
On arrival at the airport in Ho Chi Minh City, teacher and students will be driven to visit [...]

The post Vietnam – Land of History – 9 Days appeared first on Vietnam Vacation.

A Thrilling Hai Van Pass Adventure With Onetrip

by Phuc Nguyen @ The Christina's Blog

Vietnam is a fabulous country that sings harmonies of the wild jungle and the people that venture through it. That is a destination that you must visit at least once in your life if you seek adventure. One of the most desired places to stay in Vietnam for both foreigners and locals alike is Da […]

The post A Thrilling Hai Van Pass Adventure With Onetrip appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

Food safety challenges in Vietnam

Food safety challenges in Vietnam


www.tuv-sud.com

Vietnam has seen a strong surge in food and beverage consumption, making it an attractive market for food producers, importers and retailers. Find out what are the food safety challenges faced by producers, importers and retailers in Vietnam.

Staying Healthy in Vietnam - How to Not Get Sick During Your Vacation | XO Tours Blog

Staying Healthy in Vietnam - How to Not Get Sick During Your Vacation | XO Tours Blog


XO Tours Blog

One of the fastest ways to ruin a vacation is by falling sick! Here are some great tips on how to stay healthy during your time in Vietnam.

What makes Parmigiano-Reggiano Parmigiano-Reggiano?

What makes Parmigiano-Reggiano Parmigiano-Reggiano?

by @ Eat This Podcast

Great wheels of parmesan cheese, stamped all about with codes and official-looking markings, loudly shout that they are the real thing: Parmigiano-Reggiano DOP. They’re backed by a long list of rules and regulations that the producers must obey in order to qualify for the seal of approval, rules that were drawn up by the producers themselves to protect their product from cheaper interlopers. For parmesan, the rules specify how the milk is turned into cheese and how the cheese is matured. They specify geographic boundaries that enclose not only where the cows must live but also where most of their feed must originate. But they say nothing about the breed of cow, which you might think could affect the final product, one of many anomalies that Zachary Nowak, a food historian, raised during his presentation at the recent Perugia Food Conference on Terroir, which he helped to organise. In the end the whole question of certification is about marketing, prompted originally by increasingly lengthy supply chains that distanced consumers from producers. One problem, as Zach pointed out, is that in coming up with the rules to protect their product, the producers necessarily take a snapshot of the product as it is then, ignoring both its history and future evolution. They seek to give the impression that this is how it has always been done, since time immemorial, while at the same time conveniently forgetting aspects of the past, like the black wax or soot that once enclosed parmesan cheese, or the saffron that coloured it, or the diverse diet that sustained the local breed of cattle. One aspect of those forgettings that brought me up short was the mezzadria, a system of sharecropping that survived well into the 1960s. Zach has written about it on his website; some of the memories of a celebrated Perugian greengrocer offer a good starting point. Will some enterprising cheesemaker take up the challenge of producing a cheese as good as Parmigiano-Reggiano DOP somewhere else? No idea, but if anyone does, it’ll probably be a cheesemaker in Vermont, subject of the next show. Notes The 2nd Perugia Food Conference Of Places and Tastes: Terroir, Locality, and the Negotiation of Gastro-cultural Boundaries took place from 5–8 June 2014. It was organized by the Food Studies Program of the Umbra Institute. Wikipedia has masses of information about Geographical indications and traditional specialities in the European Union and, of course, Parmigiano-Reggiano which may, or may not, be parmesan. Official site of the Consorzio del Parmigiano-Reggiano. Thanks to Zachary Nowak for his map of the soils of the Parmigiano-Reggiano DOP.

Eat This Newsletter 052

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Not for the gluten-intolerant: African agriculture, food systems, The League of Kitchens and Mamoosh pita.

Worst food diagram ever?

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

"[C]alories from all food groups increased, fats and oils and the meat group most of all, dairy and fruits and vegetables the least."

Xylella is here and it could be dangerous

Xylella is here and it could be dangerous

by @ Eat This Podcast

Climate change and global trade combine to make it ever more likely that new pests and diseases will threaten food supplies. A classic example is playing out now in Puglia, the region that includes the heel of Italy's boot. The disease is caused by a bacterium -- Xylella fastidiosa -- that clogs the xylem vessels that carry water up from the roots. No water means leaves shrivel and scorch and eventually the host plant can die. In 2013, Xylella was found for the first time in Europe, in olive trees near Gallipoli. Plant health plans swung into action, to try and eradicate, or at least contain, the disease. And so did politicians and activists, blocking progress with ignorance, half-truths and manipulation. In consequence, the disease has now spread to cover the whole of the Salento peninsula. In the view of people much more expert than I, there may now be no stopping Xylella. Rodrigo Almeida, of the University of California, published an article in Science last week, asking Can Apulia's olive trees be saved? As he is an expert, I see no reason to present a different point of view, so you may find the podcast one sided. So be it. Notes Rodrigo Almeida's article is behind a paywall, but if you want a copy, I'm sure I can help you find one. Thomas Simpson is keeping a website that offers quick and helpful translations of articles about Xylella. It is a great resource if you want to know more about the foolishness. While I have your attention, let's hear it for expertise.

Food safety opportunity

by Robert @ Nordesk – Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam

The post Food safety opportunity appeared first on Nordesk - Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam.

Hue: On the Food Trail of Kings

by The Historienne @ HOTTABLE

If while wandering the spooky streets of Hue, you develop a particular taste for the city’s unique assortment of sticky rice paper dishes, soups and fried pancakes, you have royalty to thank.

The post Hue: On the Food Trail of Kings appeared first on HOTTABLE.

‘Essential’ food safety inspections continue during shutdown

by Dan Flynn @ Food Safety News

Whether Congressional gremlins working in the wee hours of the morning agreed to call off the partial government shutdown or whether they’ve allowed it to spill into Monday morning, one thing won’t change. Inspectors from the U.S. Department of Agriculture will be showing up for work at the nation’s 6,200 meat and poultry slaughter and... Continue Reading

Eat This Newsletter 049

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Stimulation for mind and body; keeping harvests dry, making cacao harvest go further, coping with abundant harvests, the harvest of food anthropology, the biology of maca.

Imposing user fees on veterinary antimicrobials is a plausible way to curb antimicrobial use in food animals

Imposing user fees on veterinary antimicrobials is a plausible way to curb antimicrobial use in food animals

by Susan MacMillan @ ILRI news

New research findings suggest that imposing a user fee on veterinary antimicrobials is a plausible policy option to achieve meaningful reductions in antimicrobial use in the short term while simultaneously raising funds to improve farming practices that will benefit the long-term viability of the livestock industry. Continue reading

Good industrial food

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Where’s the romance in milking 300 sheep by hand, twice a day?

A far from dismal scientist

A far from dismal scientist

by @ Eat This Podcast

Speculators are responsible for food price spikes? Food price spikes are responsible for riots in the streets? First-world hipsters are responsible for hungry quinoa farmers in Peru? Seeking answers to basic questions.

Suspected norovirus illnesses temporarily close restaurant

by News Desk @ Food Safety News

A Seattle restaurant is temporarily closed because of illnesses reported by customers. The Pho Aroma restaurant will not reopen until public health officials give their OK. The local health department, Public Health Seattle & King County, reported Thursday that is is investigating at least five cases of suspected norovirus linked to the restaurant; three customers... Continue Reading

Food — and bombs — in Laos

Food — and bombs — in Laos

by @ Eat This Podcast

Karen Coates is a freelance American journalist who writes about food – among other things. She emailed to ask if I would be interested in talking to her about a book that she and her husband, photographer Jerry Redfern, have produced. It’s called Eternal Harvest, but it isn’t about food, at least not directly. Its subtitle is the legacy of American bombs in Laos. Some of those bombs are 500-pounders. Lots of them are little tennis-ball sized bomblets, which are as attractive to farm kids as a tennis ball might be, with horrific consequences. The story of unexploded ordnance in Laos was an eye opener, for me. But I also wanted to know about food in Laos, and so that’s where we began our conversation. Over the course of nine years and a bombing mission every eight minutes, round the clock, more than 270 million cluster bombs – or bombies – were dropped on Laos. The cluster bombs were a small part of the 2 million tonnes dropped on Laos, almost half a tonne of ordnance for every man, woman and child in the country. Some was aimed at breaking the Ho Chi Minh Trail. The rest was jettisoned by pilots who had been told not to return to base with any bombs left in their planes. The failure rate, as Karen said, was around 30 percent. Unexploded ordnance remains an ever-present threat, and not only during the business of farming. About half the people killed, according a a 2009 report, were going after scrap metal. A scrap metal collector can make $5 a day, compared to the average wage of about $1 a day. And that’s not the only way the bombs are “beneficial”. Many farming families use craters – created by bombs that did explode – as fish ponds, improving both their income and their nutritional status. Casualties have dropped, from about 1450 a year in 1975 to about 350 a year in 2009, but less than one per cent of the land has been cleared. Notes Eternal Harvest: the legacy of American bombs in Laos has a website and is available from Amazon. I started reading up about bomb crater fish ponds at Nicola Twilley’s Edible Geography. Fascinating accounts of individual farmers bring an otherwise dry FAO field manual on common aquaculture practices in Lao PDR to life. The maps in this online post by Xiaoxuan Lu about her thesis give some idea of the scale of the problem. Karen writes online at The Rambling Spoon and elsewhere. There’s plenty there about restaurants, Lao cookbooks and that nine-day field trip we talked about. The music is a Lao folk tune called Dokmai (Flower) by a group called “Thiphakon (roughly, resonance of angels)”. I found it online. Engage

YEP Effect 3, including YEP Vision 2030

by F&BKP Office @ Food & Business Knowledge Platform

The YEP Programme Bureau has published the third edition of YEP Effect with inspiring stories from Young Experts in Water and Agrofood, their organizations and their working environment and more information on the YEP Vision 2030. »

The post YEP Effect 3, including YEP Vision 2030 appeared first on Food & Business Knowledge Platform.

Podcast “Hope in Kisumu”

by F&BKP Office @ Food & Business Knowledge Platform

The podcast "Hope in Kisumu" is a story from the Women Food Entrepreneurs project in Kenya and Burkina Faso. The project aims to build inclusive business models for food security in the city slums of Kisumu and Ouagadougou. »

The post Podcast “Hope in Kisumu” appeared first on Food & Business Knowledge Platform.

Grand Opening Phu Tho Platform

by Vu Nguyen @ Neovia Vietnam

On 27th Sep, 2017, Neovia Vietnam officially opened its 11th platform in Viet Tri City, Phu Tho Province.  With dimension of 1,000 m2, Phu Tho platform has the capacity of 3,500 tons per month for both livestock and poultry feed of Guyomarc’h and Cofna. This platform will better support the transportation of feed to dealers … Continue reading Grand Opening Phu Tho Platform

A far from dismal scientist

A far from dismal scientist

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Speculators are responsible for food price spikes? Food price spikes are responsible for riots in the streets? First-world hipsters are responsible for hungry quinoa farmers in Peru? Seeking answers to basic questions.

Study: Climate Change Threatens Rice Production

by Michelle Greenhalgh @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

According to a new collaborative study released this week by a group of international scientists, the production of rice will be hindered as temperatures increase in rice-growing areas from global warming. According to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, the research team found evidence that the net impact of projected temperature increases... Continue Reading

A brief survey of the food of Corfu

A brief survey of the food of Corfu

by @ Eat This Podcast

Signs of the Venetian occupation are everywhere, as are the imprints of French and British rule. But there are also unique aspects to food and culture on Corfu.

Vietnam – New Penal Code provides stricter sanctions for food safety violations

Vietnam – New Penal Code provides stricter sanctions for food safety violations

by Cesare Varallo @ FOOD LAW LATEST

“According to Vietnam’s amended Penal Code which took effect on Jan. 1, the slightest penalty for filthy food producers or traders is a fine of 50-200 million Vietnamese dong (2,200-8,800 U.S. dollars) or a jail term of 1-5 years, and the heaviest one is a jail term of 12-20 years, daily newspaper Tien Phong (Pioneer) … Continue reading Vietnam – New Penal Code provides stricter sanctions for food safety violations

Briefly: Tapeworm tale — IAFP 2018 — Sanitary food transport

by News Desk @ Food Safety News

Every hour of every day people around the world are living with and working to resolve food safety issues. Here is a sampling of current headlines for your consumption, brought to you today with the support of Alchemy Systems. Registration opens for IAFP 2018 Registration is now open for the 2018 conference of the International Association for Food... Continue Reading

Very Ngon Homewares

by AsiaLIFE @ AsiaLIFE Vietnam

When Lise Nguyen-Owen came to Vietnam in 2008 to volunteer at a non-governmental organisation, she noticed a disturbing dearth of tea towels. Then she discovered ...

Food safety in Vietnam

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

[F]reshness is responsible for much of the safety as well as the deliciousness of Vietnamese dishes. Researchers have found freshness to be the most preferred attribute of pork for Vietnamese consumers, with pork meat typically being purchased very fresh every day."

Massive Webinar on USA/FDA labeling rules and upcoming news

Massive Webinar on USA/FDA labeling rules and upcoming news

by Cesare Varallo @ FOOD LAW LATEST

Recently I have been asked by several clients in  to run a webinar helping them to approach the US market, when it comes to import rules for food and labeling. They were from India, from Italy, as well as from America…a bit difficult to put things together… Therefore, coherently with our global and democratic approach … Continue reading Massive Webinar on USA/FDA labeling rules and upcoming news

Catfish Importer Sent to Prison

by Dan Flynn @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

When the domestic catfish industry talks about its competition from the “Mekong Delta” being unfair and maybe illegal, it sometimes sounds a little paranoid,  Now, however, U.S. catfish producers have a story to tell that pretty well proves at least some of those imports are not only unfair, but illegal. In other words, there was... Continue Reading

Culture and Cuisine in Russia & Eastern Europe

Culture and Cuisine in Russia & Eastern Europe

by @ Eat This Podcast

About a month ago I got wind of a conference called Food for Thought: Culture and Cuisine in Russia & Eastern Europe, 1800-present, at the University of Texas at Austin. In some dream world, I would have booked a flight there and then, packed my audio gear, and plunged in. Next best thing, thanks to the kind offices of Rachel Laudan, was to talk to Mary C. Neuburger, the conference organiser. It isn’t clear whether the symposium will give rise to a publication. I hope so. And if, by chance, any of the authors have made versions of their talks available, I would be delighted to link to them here. Just let me know. Other sources include The Austin Chronicle, which took the opportunity to visit and review a local Russian restaurant. And Mary Neuburger also mentioned Anya von Bremzen’s memoir Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking: A Memoir of Food and Longing. That, I hope, is another story for another time, preferably not in a dream world. Looking through the conference programme, I had singled out a few papers that I thought might be of interest, and Mary was kind enough to deal with almost all of them, and more besides. Specifics: Bella Bychkova-Jordan, University of Texas “Traveling Foods: Diffusion of Native Food Complexes from the New World to Different Parts of Eurasia.” Michael Pesenson, University of Texas “Feasting and Fasting in Muscovite Rus.” Irina Glouchshenko, Moscow School of Higher Economics “Industrialization of Taste: Anastas Mikoyan and the Making of Soviet Cuisine in the 1930s.” Brian Davies and Kolleen Guy, University of Texas San Antonio “Why Don’t We Drink Russian Malbec: The Crimean Origins of a ‘French’ Varietal?” Nikolai Burlakoff, Independent Scholar "Borsch (Borscht, Bortsch, Borschch): From Hogweed Soup to Outer Space, the Improbable Odyssey of the World’s Best Known Soup Dish.” Mary Neuburger, University of Texas “Cooking for Bai Tosho: A Bulgarian Celebrity Chef Serves up the Past.” Engage

Coffee Habit of Vietnamese people

by Stephen @ Vietnam Vacation

Every visitor come to Vietnam are surprised that Vietnam is the second largest coffee producing country in the world and how Vietnamese enjoy coffee is not the same with the [...]

The post Coffee Habit of Vietnamese people appeared first on Vietnam Vacation.

Record shows Jimmy John’s sprouts repeatedly sicken patrons

by Dan Flynn @ Food Safety News

The crowdsourcing site www.iwaspoisoned.com continues to show the Illinois-Wisconsin region as the center of a Salmonella montevideo outbreak likely caused by raw sprouts at Jimmy John’s restaurants. The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was able to get a public warning out on the latest outbreak involving Jimmy John’s on Friday, just before the... Continue Reading

National School Lunch Program aces ground beef safety review 

by News Desk @ Food Safety News

There’s good news for millions of children who participate in the program daily: The National School Lunch Program’s strict food safety standards work. A study led by researchers from the University of Connecticut and the U.S. Department of Agriculture found that food safety standards for ground beef supplied to the program are highly effective in keeping harmful... Continue Reading

Changing Global Diets: the website

Changing Global Diets: the website

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

A picture is worth way more than 1000 words when it reveals food trends over the past 50 years for more than 150 countries.

A Foodie’s Guide to Hue, Vietnam

by Phuc Nguyen @ The Christina's Blog

Come to Hue and Eat like a Local Hue City is the old capital of Vietnam. Despite its location – next to Da Nang – the new economic center, Hue is calm and peaceful in a unique way. If you want to have a truly relaxing travel experience, Hue is definitely the city you must […]

The post A Foodie’s Guide to Hue, Vietnam appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

How the Irish created the great wines of Bordeaux (and elsewhere)

How the Irish created the great wines of Bordeaux (and elsewhere)

by @ Eat This Podcast

I confess, quaffing a Lynch-Bages or a snifter of Hennessy, I have wondered how it is that such fine upstanding Irish names come to be associated with cognac and claret. There my wonderings ended, until a recent visit to Ireland, where, in Cork and Kinsale, I found answers. Starting in the 17th century an intrepid band of Irish emigrants set out first for France, then the rest of Europe, and ultimately almost anywhere wines are made. And almost everywhere they went, the Irish diaspora had an impact on wine-making that belies the idea that the Irish know only about beers. The story is a complex one, built on tarriff wars, free trade and political union, with a touch of religious persecution thrown in for good measure. Sound familiar? Notes Chad Ludington’s book is called The Politics of Wine in Britain. A paperback edition should be available soon. The Wine Museum is housed in Desmond Castle in Kinsale, a lovely local bus ride from Cork. Want to know more about Kinsale? While searching around, I came across a blog post all about Kinsale. The Chateau Montelena story may be worth exploring.

Hepatitis A found in tuna; time limited for post-exposure shots

by Coral Beach @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

Anyone who has not been vaccinated for Hepatitis A and has eaten imported yellowfin tuna in the past two weeks — especially if they live in California, Oklahoma, New York or Texas — should consider getting a post-exposure prophylactic shot for the virus. That recommendation from public health officials with the Food and Drug Administration... Continue Reading

Culture and agriculture in the Pamirs

Culture and agriculture in the Pamirs

by @ Eat This Podcast

The Pamir Mountains of Central Asia hold a fascinating diversity of food crops. Exploring the area in the early years of the 20th century the great Russian botanist Nikolai Vavilov became convinced that this was where “the original evolution of many cultivated plants took place.” Soft club wheat, with its short ears, rye, barley, oil plants, grain legumes like chick peas and lentils, melons and many fruits and vegetables; all showed the kind of diversity that Vavilov said pointed to the places where they were first domesticated. As he wrote, “it is still possible to observe the almost imperceptible transition from wild to cultivated forms within the area.” Frederik van Oudenhoven first travelled to the Pamirs in 2007 to document what remained of that rich agricultural biodiversity. What he found was bewildering, until he began to talk to Pamiri people, and especially the older women, about their food and culture. The result is With Our Own Hands: a celebration of food and life in the Pamir Mountains of Tajikistan and Afghanistan, a new book by van Oudenhoven and his co-author Jamila Haider, that documents a culture that remains in danger of disappearing. Notes With Our Own Hands is published by LM Publishers, who say it will be available from tomorrow, 7 July. If you think you might want a copy, order without delay; until tomorrow the price is reduced to €34.50 from €54.50. You can get a taste here. There are also a couple of scholarly articles online. Imagining alternative futures through the lens of food in the Afghan and Tajik Pamir mountains and Food as a method in development practice. Photos by Frederik van Oudenhoven. The banner shows an Afghan settlement in Darvaz, along the Panj River, in autumn, with yellow mulberrry trees and red apricots. the other picture is Frederik and his co-author Jamila Haider.

Frozen food company recalls green beans after pet food recall

by News Desk @ Food Safety News

National Frozen Foods Corp. issued a Class I recall of individual quick frozen green beans because of potential Listeria monocytogenes contamination, according to notices posted by US Foods Inc. and the U.S. Department of Defense Commissary Agency. The frozen food manufacturer issued its recall following the detection of Listeria monocytogenes in a third-party test by... Continue Reading

ASEAN region MO coordination meeting

by Tran Dang Khoa @ GS1 Vietnam

From May 24th to 25th, 2017 in Ho Chi Minh City, GS1 Vietnam hosted the ASEAN region MO coordination meeting which was organized by GS1 GO. Attending the event there...

The post ASEAN region MO coordination meeting appeared first on GS1 Vietnam.

Mistaken about mayonnaise — and many other foods

Mistaken about mayonnaise — and many other foods

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Alternative food facts tramp across the landscape the hordes of the undead. Tom Nealon's new book Food Fights & Culture Wars aims to lay some of them to rest.

Workshop on food quality management and food safety – QMFS 2017

by Tran Dang Khoa @ GS1 Vietnam

In order to improve the capacity of training and research and strengthen cross-sector cooperation in quality management and food safety, the Institute of Biotechnology and Food Technology (Hanoi University of...

The post Workshop on food quality management and food safety – QMFS 2017 appeared first on GS1 Vietnam.

Get Off the Beaten Track in Hue, Vietnam

by Phuong Thuy @ The Christina's Blog

Located on the bank of Perfume River, this city is the capital of Thua Thien Hue province, 700 kilometers to the south of Hanoi. Although you can visit Hue at any time of the year, the most charming season is surely from March to August, especially March through April when the temperature is at its […]

The post Get Off the Beaten Track in Hue, Vietnam appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

Edible aroids

Edible aroids

by @ Eat This Podcast

A Dutch food writer tries to discover the origins of pom, the national dish of Suriname. Is it Creole, based on the foodways of Africans enslaved to work the sugar plantations of Surinam? Or is it Jewish, brought to Suriname by Dutch Jews? So began Karin Vaneker’s immersion in the world of edible aroids. Aroids are a large and cosmopolitan plant family, more commonly known as the arum family, and they include some of the most familiar houseplants. Many of them have starchy roots or tubers, and although these often contain harmful substances, people have learned how to process them as famine foods. A few species, however, are widely cultivated. The best-known of these is probably taro, Colocasia esculenta, which originated in southeast Asia and spread through the Pacific and beyond. That, however, proved not to be the elusive pomtajer that Karin and the Surinamese inhabitants of Amsterdam were looking for, which turned out to be a species of Xanthosoma. My conversation with Karin ranged far and wide, and to tell the truth I never did ask whether pom was Jewish or Creole. Most sources say it is indeed Jewish. Notes The whole question of Jews in Suriname sent me scurrying to the search engines, to discover that starting in the 17th century there was indeed an attempt to establish an autonomous Jewish territory there, on the Jewish savanna. This I gotta read more about. And having found that, I rushed to Claudia Roden’s The Book of Jewish Food, only to be massively disappointed that neither pom nor Suriname feature in the index. The big photo is of purple-stemmed Colocasia, which I took at Longwood Gardens. As promised, a recipe for pom. You’ll have to find your own pomtajer. Karin has written on Cooking Pom and other edible aroids.

Importer recalls Mekong Master swai for lack of residue testing

by News Desk @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

A California importer is recalling 42 tons of frozen swai from Vietnam because it discovered the fish fillets did not meet U.S. requirements concerning residue sampling and testing. Vinh Hoan USA Inc. of Tustin, CA, distributed the frozen Mekong Master branded swai fillets to wholesalers in Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri and Wisconsin. The recall... Continue Reading

A brief survey of the food of Corfu

A brief survey of the food of Corfu

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Signs of the Venetian occupation are everywhere, as are the imprints of French and British rule. But there are also unique aspects to food and culture on Corfu.

EU and China Jointly Tackle Food Fraud

by admin2 @ Global Food Safety Forum

Yushuang Sun   With the rapid development of food and chemical industries, use of new materials, booming global trade and the resulting complexity in food supply chains, food fraud has become a global issue. Over the past decade, scandals related to adulterated and fake food have made international headlines and generated waves of consumer backlash. […]

Who invented dried pasta?

Who invented dried pasta?

by @ Eat This Podcast

The history of pasta, ancient and modern, is littered with myths about the origins of manufacturing techniques, of cooking, of recipes, of names, of antecedents. Supporting most of these is a sort of truthiness whereby what matters most is not evidence or facts but – appropriately for us – gut feeling. Combine that with the echo chamber of the internet, and an idea can become true by virtue of repetition. So it is, by and large, for the idea that Arabs were responsible for inventing dried pasta and for introducing it to Sicily, from where it spread to the rest of the peninsula and beyond. You can find versions of this story almost everywhere you look for the history of dried pasta. Anthony Buccini’s gut feeling, however, was that this story was not true. His expertise in historical linguistics and sociolinguistics tells him that the linguistic evidence for an Arab origin gets the whole story backwards; rather, one of the principal elements in the spread of dried pasta through Italy and beyond was the commercial expansion of Genoa. The stuff itself was being made in southern Italy, the Genoese took the word and the stuff to the north and to Catalonia, and it was the Catalonians who took them to the Maghreb and the Arabs. So what did the Arabs do? They wrote it down in their cookbooks. And a bit more besides. Notes The 2nd Perugia Food Conference Of Places and Tastes: Terroir, Locality, and the Negotiation of Gastro-cultural Boundaries took place from 5–8 June 2014. It was organized by the Food Studies Program of the Umbra Institute. World Pasta Day falls on 25th October. Enough time to prepare something special? Banner photograph taken by Su-Lin in Vancouver. Used with permission.

An English woman’s take on Italian cooking

An English woman’s take on Italian cooking

by @ Eat This Podcast

Rachel Roddy, after about 10 years of hard slog, is an overnight sensation. She's just scooped the André Simon award for best food book in 2015, a very big deal indeed for a first book. I'd been warming up this second helping for a day or two before that news came through last Friday. My original reason for revisiting this episode was that her book, Five Quarters: Recipes and Notes from a Kitchen in Rome, is due to be published in the US tomorrow, 2 February, under a somewhat different title: My Kitchen in Rome: Recipes and Notes on Italian Cooking The different titles were just one of the things we talked about and that are worth sharing again; Rachel's well-deserved award provides an extra reason. There's a lot more packed into the original, full-length episode. Rachel talked about how a website turned into a book and about how she's discovering life and cooking in one of the less glamorous towns of Sicily, the subject of her next book.

The Vietnamese pet care market

by Robert @ Nordesk – Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam

The post The Vietnamese pet care market appeared first on Nordesk - Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam.

Singapore and Thailand are top destinations for Vietnamese

by indochinaresearch @ Indochina Research

Among surveyed Vietnamese living in urban Hanoi and HCM city, Singapore and Thailand are the top intended destination to travel in 2017. Interest for regional destinations is highest in overall followed by Japan South Korea which is particularly attracting Hanoians.

The post Singapore and Thailand are top destinations for Vietnamese appeared first on Indochina Research.

GFSF-CCIC PARTNERSHIP / GFSF-CCIC合作伙伴关系

by admin2 @ Global Food Safety Forum

  GFSF (www.globalfoodsafetyforum.org ) and CCIC (http://www.ccic.com/web/static/catalogs/catalog_english/english.html) are proud to announce their collaboration for future food safety activities.   Our collaboration will focus on activities underway in China for 2017-2018.  CCIC is a leading inspection, certification, and testing service provider. Their inspection services include pre-shipment and consumer product inspection; certification services include product, management and international […]

Eat This Newsletter 050

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

50 not out! Foods far from home and a little more on fat taxes and thin subsidies.

It’s putrid, it’s paleo, and it’s good for you

It’s putrid, it’s paleo, and it’s good for you

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

John Speth on how food we may consider disgusting is essential for survival in the Arctic, with added disgusting goodness from Paul Rozin.

A deep dive into cucurbit names

A deep dive into cucurbit names

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Continuing the short season of bits and pieces that didn't quite fit in the year's episodes by getting to grips with the origin of "gherkin" and other names we give cucurbits.

Cheese in aspic

Cheese in aspic

by @ Eat This Podcast

There's a thin line between protecting the authenticity of a fine traditional food and preventing the kinds of living changes that allowed it to survive long enough to become traditional. Zack Nowak, a food historian, looked at the rules governing the manufacture of genuine Parmigiano-Reggiano DOP cheese and the cheese's actual history. The rules say you can't, but could you make an equally good parmesan somewhere else? Extracted from the original episode broadcast after the 2nd Perugia Food Conference. Music by podington bear.

Top 8 Best Beaches in Phu Quoc

by Stephen @ Vietnam Vacation

Located in the Gulf of Thailand, Phu Quoc is the largest island in Vietnam including the island proper and more than 20 smaller islets. With around 150 kilometers of coastal [...]

The post Top 8 Best Beaches in Phu Quoc appeared first on Vietnam Vacation.

The Beginner's Guide to Food Safety in Vietnam - The Christina's Blog

The Beginner's Guide to Food Safety in Vietnam - The Christina's Blog


The Christina's Blog

Vietnam is a developing country so food safety issues are quite frequent. Here are what to look out for and all the do’s and don'ts of eating street food.

Off The Beaten Path in Vietnam

by Brinda Shah @ XO Tours Blog

Vietnam is seeing more and more visitors each year, with the actual number of tourists per year reaching well over 6 million.  Some areas in Vietnam, such as Halong Bay, Sapa, and Hoi An, are very beautiful but also packed with tourists year round.  Fortunately, if you want to get away from the crowds, you…

WELCOME TO THE 4TH GUYOMARC’H SPORT FESTIVAL – 2017

by Vu Nguyen @ Neovia Vietnam

Sports spirit – Team building spirit – Neovia Vietnam Xtreme spirit On 25th of August 2017, the Guyomarc’h Sport Festival organized its 4th Annual event in Long An Stadium with the participation of more than 350 athletes and fans of 05 football clubs from Dong Nai, Ben Tre, Tra Vinh and Long An provinces. This … Continue reading WELCOME TO THE 4TH GUYOMARC’H SPORT FESTIVAL – 2017

A partial history of the turkey

A partial history of the turkey

by @ Eat This Podcast

For a nomenclature nerd, the turkey is wonderful. Why would a bird from America be named after a country on the edge of Asia?

Eat This Newsletter 055

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Food tourism of various kinds, the Rituals of Dinner and a piece that will take you back to The Jungle. Oh, and Seed Rebels.

How to eat well in Italy

How to eat well in Italy

by @ Eat This Podcast

People looking for a good place to eat in Rome can choose from almost as many opinions as there are restaurants. Truth be told, though, a lot of those opinions have been shared by ninnies. Seriously, if you're looking for some harmless entertainment as you wait for the bill to arrive after an excellent meal that you've thoroughly enjoyed, read what some of the people on some crowd-sourced websites have said about the place where you are eating. But I digress. Rather than wade through countless ninny-posts looking for a realistic recommendation, many visitors, and some residents, turn to one of the food writers based here. Among those, one person reigns supreme: Elizabeth Minchilli. Through social media, apps, books and tours, she tirelessly points people in the right direction. Her new book came out this spring. That’s a good enough reason for me to sit down for a drink with Elizabeth in her local neighbourhood. Notes The book is Eating Rome: Living the Good Life in the Eternal City. Her blog is here. Elsewhere, she’s @eminchilli. We met at Urbana 47 which is indeed a fun place to hang out. I captured the banner image, and the rigatoni a la gricia that grace the podcast cover on iTunes, at Perilli, immediately after Elizabeth and I met, and which, I swear, had been selected long before our conversation. The food is a lot more consistent than the typography.

End of Year survey: Food safety is most concerned issue of Vietnamese people

by IRL.Vietnam @ Indochina Research

Food safety is most concerned issue of Vietnamese people, according to End of Year survey by Indochina Research. Among different hot social topics in Vietnam, people prioritize food safety the most.  End of Year survey by Indochina Research finds that 49% of respondents say this is the most important issue that needs to be addressed in the future. […]

The post End of Year survey: Food safety is most concerned issue of Vietnamese people appeared first on Indochina Research.

Your research can have more impact than you may expect – Why are Brazilian cattle breeders interested in crossbred pigs

by GCP-1 @ Food & Business Knowledge Platform

Claudia Sevillano is a genetics researcher involved in the NWO Global Challenges Programme (GCP) project called “Locally adapted pork production in Brazil versus the Netherlands”. She has written this story of change following the GCP training on November 1, 2017, facilitated by Perspectivity. »

The post Your research can have more impact than you may expect – Why are Brazilian cattle breeders interested in crossbred pigs appeared first on Food & Business Knowledge Platform.

Food safety risk management in Vietnam: Challenges and opportunities

Food safety risk management in Vietnam: Challenges and opportunities


World Bank

The study aimed to take stock of the food safety situation and food safety control systems in Vietnam, analyse the food safety risks for selected key food value chains, and provide recommendations to improve food safety.

PILOT PROJECT ON GS1 NUMBERING AND BAR CODING APPLICATION IN TRADING OF ORGANIC FOODS IN GMS DUE TO ADB TA-8163 PROJECT

by Tran Dang Khoa @ GS1 Vietnam

Under the GMS (Great Mekong Sub regions) program financed by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) (TA-8163 Project), member states in the sub region Developed and approved a Strategy for the...

The post PILOT PROJECT ON GS1 NUMBERING AND BAR CODING APPLICATION IN TRADING OF ORGANIC FOODS IN GMS DUE TO ADB TA-8163 PROJECT appeared first on GS1 Vietnam.

Backyard vegetable breeding

Backyard vegetable breeding

by @ Eat This Podcast

Carol Deppe was a guest here a few months ago, talking about how most people misunderstand the potato, which is about as nutritious a vegetable as you could hope for. I found out about that because I was checking out her new book, The Resilient Gardener, which offers all kinds of advice for making the most of home-grown food. In that, Carol talks about having bred a delicata squash with a taste like a medjool date. That sounded intriguing, but in a way not all that surprising. If anyone could breed a squash – or pumpkin – that tasted like a date, it would be Carol Deppe. Her earlier book, Breed Your Own Vegetable Varieties, is a wonderful, informative and accessible book about the science of plant genetics. It is, in fact, better than all the text books I’ve ever read on the subject. Which is not surprising, as that’s what Deppe set out to write. The whole business of squashes seems fraught with difficulty. First off, what do you call them: zucchini, pumpkins, courgettes, summer squash, winter squash? Is there any difference (in England) between a baby marrow and a courgette, or between an overgrown zucchini and a marrow? ((Questions to which I returned in 2016: When is a zucchini not a zucchini?)) And calling them by their Latin names doesn’t really help, because the same species can be used in different ways, and it is the usage that tends to determine what they’re called. The idea of drying a summer squash for use through the winter is very appealing, and Carol says that costata romanesco, and old Italian heritage variety, is one of the few varieties suitable for treating in this way. Looking at pictures, it does seem to be very similar to the variety I see on the market here, so I’m determined now to see whether I can persuade my local vegetable seller to bring me an overgrown zucchini – a zuchone, or just a zucca? He’ll probably think I’m mad, when everybody else wants them as tiny as possible. Notes The Resilient Gardener is published by Chelsea Green Publishing. A keen amateur breeder called Rebsie Fairholm was doing wonderful things breeding a purple-podded mange-tout pea, inspired and informed by Carol Deppe’s work. Alas, she seems to have stopped for now, although you can still read about her efforts on her website. Banner photo by McBeth. Intro music by Dan-O at DanoSongs.com. Outro music, you shouldn’t be surprised to learn, is Tonight, tonight by the Smashing Pumpkins. Sometimes obvious is good.

Egyptian street food in London

Egyptian street food in London

by @ Eat This Podcast

As promised, another second helping from one of 2015's episodes, before we get to the new stuff. This time, I'm remembering my trip to the little place in St Martin's Lane in London that serves a couture version of koshari, the iconic street food of Egypt. And one trouble with these second helpings is that there's not much new to say about the topic or the episode, so I'll just point you to the full episode from March 2015 and let you explore there. (I will also repeat the relevant show notes below). Speaking of new stuff, a couple of weeks ago, I was depressed about not being able to go to the Amsterdam Symposium on the History of Food this year. Thanks to the great generosity of a friend, I was able to go, and the first new episode of the year will be one I recorded there. There wasn't any tulip bulb soup on offer this time, and perhaps that's just as well. Notes Koshari Street is at 56 At Martin’s Lane, London, WC2N 4EA. And online Anissa Helou is also online and her book Mediterranean Street Food is still available.

Why save seeds?

Why save seeds?

by @ Eat This Podcast

What, really, is the point of conserving agricultural biodiversity? The formal sector, genebanks and the like, will say it is about genetic resources and having on hand the traits to breed varieties that will solve the challenges tomorrow might throw up. Thousands of seed savers around the world might well agree with that, at least partially. I suspect, though, that for most seed savers the primary reason is surely more about food, about having the varieties they want to eat. David Cavagnaro has always championed that view. David’s is a fascinating personal history, which currently sees him working on the Pepperfield Project, “A Non-Profit Organization Located in Decorah, IA Promoting and Teaching Hands-On Cooking, Gardening and Agrarian Life Skills”. I first met David 15 or 20 years ago at Seed Savers Exchange in Decorah. This year, I was lucky enough to be invited there again, and I lost no time in finding time for a chat. David pointed out that immigrants are often keen gardeners and, perforce, seed savers as they struggle to maintain their distinctive food culture in a new land. That’s true for the Hmong in Minneapolis, Asian communities in England and, I’m sure, many others elsewhere. What happens as those communities assimilate? The children and grandchildren of the immigrant gardeners are unlikely to feel the same connection to their original food culture, and may well look down on growing food as an unsuitable occupation. Is immigrant agricultural biodiversity liable to be lost too? Efforts to preserve it don’t seem to be flourishing. Seed saving for its own sake, rather than purely as a route to sustenance, does seem to be both a bit of a luxury and to require a rather special kind of personality. John Withee, whose bean collection brought David Cavagnaro to Seed Savers Exchange and people like Russ Crow, another of his spritual heirs, collect and create stories as much as they do agricultural biodiversity. And that’s something formal genebanks never seem to document. Notes John Withee’s bean cookbook looks like it would be very interesting. Indeed, the whole Yankee bean-hole thing would be fun to explore. Are you aware of people adopting “immigrant” foods not just to eat, but to conserve? My mother-in-law had red shiso (Perilla frustescens) volunteers all over the place, although I’m pretty sure she never used it as a herb. The lemongrass on my balcony hardly counts. Can you point me to a public or private bean-hole party that might welcome a nosy reporter? Would you consider reviewing Eat This Podcast on iTunes? Or nominating it for a podcasting award? Intro music by Dan-O at DanoSongs.com.

Gates Foundation grants Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Livestock Systems USD8.7 million to improve human nutrition in Burkina Faso and Ethiopia

Gates Foundation grants Feed the Future Innovation Lab for Livestock Systems USD8.7 million to improve human nutrition in Burkina Faso and Ethiopia

by Susan MacMillan @ ILRI news

The University of Florida has been awarded USD8.7 million from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to fund livestock research over the next five years to tackle high rates of food insecurity and undernutrition in two of Africa’s landlocked nations—Burkina Faso, in the west, and Ethiopia, in the east. Continue reading

Food and finance

Food and finance

by @ Eat This Podcast

Sure, you've seen Trading Places. But do you know about the history of futures contracts, or why some things are traded on commodities markets and others aren't? I didn't, not really. So I spoke to Kara Newman, food writer and author of The Secret Financial Life of Food. One of the things Kara is keen to stress is that where money is involved, there's always a temptation to cut corners, and her book is full of delicious food-based scandals. One of her favourites is The Great Salad Oil Swindle. If you've never heard of it, there's an interesting reason why. The story of The Great Salad Oil Swindle has been told in a book by Norman C. Miller, based on his Pulitzer-winning articles. Some of Miller's original articles are online, and there's a nice account originally published in Accountancy. Bottom line seems to be that while everyone was making money, no-one was inclined to investigate too closely. And an interesting coda to the story, from those articles. The bankruptcy of De Angelis brought American Express almost to its knees. While it's share price was depressed, Howard Buffett bought a sizeable stake, believing the company fundamentally sound. It was a pretty shrewd investment. Notes Kara Newman's book is the Secret Life of Food: From Commodities Markets to Supermarkets. She also has a website. Trading Places turned 30 last year. NPR's Planet Money did a bang up job of asking how accurate it was, with added Roman Mars. Photo of bacon and eggs by Phil Lees Engage

Where’s the latest episode?

Where’s the latest episode?

by @ Eat This Podcast

By rights, there should have been an episode last week, but there wasn't because I was just back from New York and the James Beard Awards, and I just didn't have time to put something together. Also, of course, I didn't win -- that honour went to Gravy, from the Southern Foodways Alliance -- and richly deserved it was too. If I had won, I'm sure I would have found time to record something, but it was an immense honour just to be nominated again. So no episode, because nothing to say, but I have been thinking about the show, and the main conclusion is that I need to carve out more time for myself to make Eat This Podcast. To do that, though, I need to spend a little less time on paid work. And that's the biggest change I want to make here. After a lot of soul-searching, I'm going to put Eat This Podcast on the line and open a Patreon account. In case you don't know about it, Patreon allows you to engage with people who are making things you like with a regular cash donation. You can do different amounts, and you can do it either per item -- per show in my case -- or per month. Anyway, the point of this episode is to let you know why the show is late. Next week, I will, definitely, for sure, have a new show -- and details of how you can help me make more and better shows.

Eat This Newsletter 057

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Catching up after being away, with fatbergs, soap and water and stuff about food and culture. Watery cucumbers too.

Agricultural foundations

Agricultural foundations

by @ Eat This Podcast

One of the things I find most frustrating in agricultural research is that, despite the subject matter, it often bears little relationship to the fundamental facts of life. Too often, we hear all sorts of extravagant claims being made that a bit of more analytical thought would show were somewhat less than likely to work out. No names, no pack drill; let's just say that natural selection has had an awful long time to try things out, and if something hasn't arisen (yet) there may well be a good reason why it isn't that great an idea. There are some people, however, bucking that trend, and Ford Denison is one of them. His book, Darwinian Agriculture: How Understanding Evolution Can Improve Agriculture came out in 2012, and I devoured it. Some recent publications reminded me that I have long meant to talk to Ford Denison about his ideas. He was kind enough to agree, and while that is no substitute for reading his work, it might just provoke people who haven't already done so to try. I hope so. No bones about it, the resulting episode is a personal pleasure for me. There is a danger, though, that in talking to someone about something I think I understand, at least partially, I forget to keep other listeners in mind. So I'd be interested to know what you thought of the show. And, more generally, would you be interested in more basic science of this kind, related, always, to food and drink? Notes Just to be transparent, the link to the book is an Amazon Affiliate link; if you buy it, I get some paltry percentage. But nobody has yet, to my knowledge, ever done that for any of my links. My somewhat gushing review is here. I stand by it all. Banner image by Arnaud Sobczyk and used under a Creative Commons licence.

Newsletter conference “Research & Policy: two peas in a pod? A dialogue for food security impact”

by F&BKP Office @ Food & Business Knowledge Platform

The conference “Research & Policy: two peas in a pod? A dialogue for food security impact” on December 1, organized by NWO-WOTRO and the F&BKP in close collaboration with the Ministries of Forgein Affairs and Agriculture, Nature and Food Quality, was a major step in improving the link between research and policy. Around 150 participants from the Netherlands, Africa and South Asia gathered in The Hague to share and connect their work in the field of food security. »

The post Newsletter conference “Research & Policy: two peas in a pod? A dialogue for food security impact” appeared first on Food & Business Knowledge Platform.

Ho Chi Minh city : New office location

by indochinaresearch @ Indochina Research

From October 9th 2017, our office location in Ho Chi Minh city is relocated to district 10, at 408 Điện Biên Phủ street. We are looking forward to welcoming your for your next qualitative groups or simply for a good Vietnamese coffee cup to discuss your research needs ! Feel free to drop by and […]

The post Ho Chi Minh city : New office location appeared first on Indochina Research.

Vietnam teams up with Netherlands, WB in food safety

Vietnam teams up with Netherlands, WB in food safety


VOV - VOV Online Newspaper

Vietnam seeks to enhance food safety management with support of the Netherlands and the World Bank (WB), announced the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MARD) on November 10.

Vietnamese consumers find it hard to trust food safety management: experts

Vietnamese consumers find it hard to trust food safety management: experts


Thanh Nien Daily

Test results can be "bought" while other certificates can be easily obtained without any food safety tests, a former agricultural official said

TECHNICAL TRAINING PROGRAM OF LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY IN NEOVIA VIETNAM

by Vu Nguyen @ Neovia Vietnam

On 14th and 15th of August, 2017, all Commercial and technical staff of livestock and poultry in the South and Cambodia participated in the training course under the guidance of lecturers from University of Agriculture and Forestry. The topic of the workshop was “How to recognize, diagnose and treat diseases in pigs and poultry”. Theoretical … Continue reading TECHNICAL TRAINING PROGRAM OF LIVESTOCK AND POULTRY IN NEOVIA VIETNAM

Citrus in Italy

Citrus in Italy

by @ Eat This Podcast

Citrus, thanks to what writer Helena Attlee calls their great “suggestibility,” confound the botanist and the shopper alike. What is the difference between a clementine and a mandarin? That was one of the few questions I didn’t ask Helena Attlee when we met recently to talk about citrus in Italy, the subject of her new book The Land Where Lemons Grow. And not just lemons. Attlee writes beautifully about all the citrus and all of Italy, from Lake Garda in the north to Palermo in the south. She covers not merely the tendency of citrus to interbreed and mutate, but also history and economics, culture, cooking and organised crime. Through it all runs a continuous thread that links the very difficulties of growing citrus productively to the desirability of the finished products, on which fortunes and entire communities were built. The Land Where Lemons Grow proves, as if it needed proving, that food provides a perfect lens through which to view the entire world, as a result of which I had to cut some choice sections from our conversation. That, however, has prompted me to try something new here, which will become apparent in a day or two as I also attempt to tidy up a bit here. Notes More about Helena Attlee at her website

A review of our “Foodie” tour by a renown New York Chef

by XO Tours @ XO Tours Blog

Here is an excerpt from the food diary of Mario Tolentino, a New York Chef and winner of The Food Network’s “Chopped” in 2010.  Mr. Tolentino, a street food fanatic, decided to take part in our “Foodie” tour on August 6th, 2011.  He was kind enough to send his review of “The Lunch Lady” and…

How a stakeholders’ committee can make a difference in the way of doing research?

by GCP-3 FT @ Food & Business Knowledge Platform

Donald Houessou works for ACED Benin and is involved in the NWO Global Challenges Programme (GCP) project called “Allotment gardens and food security in urban Africa”.  He has written this Story of change following the GCP training on November 1, 2017, facilitated by Perspectivity. A story about developing allotment gardens in Benin Key messages A »

The post How a stakeholders’ committee can make a difference in the way of doing research? appeared first on Food & Business Knowledge Platform.

Socially Responsible Travel in Hanoi (Travel and Give Back to the Community)

by Phuc Nguyen @ The Christina's Blog

The phrase “socially responsible travel” is a new trend followed by travelers all over the world, in the context that traveling and experiencing new cultures is popular nowadays. Hanoi, renown for the chaotic Old Quarter, many little temples, Dong Xuan Market that sells household goods and street food, already has so much to offer. However, […]

The post Socially Responsible Travel in Hanoi (Travel and Give Back to the Community) appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

Eat This Newsletter 062

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

ICYMT: Delicious bits of food news, plucked, at least some of the time, from obscurity.

Salmonella spurs Illinois company to recall frozen shrimp

by News Desk @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

A Northbrook, IL, company is recalling an undisclosed amount of frozen shrimp imported from Vietnam and distributed in nine states because of Salmonella contamination. Censea Inc., also known as Central Seaway Co. Inc., is recalling “A-PAC” brand headless shell on black tiger shrimp from restaurants, retailers and wholesalers after tests by the Arizona Department of... Continue Reading

IFC Supports to Improve Food Safety in Vietnam, Enhancing Agribusiness Sustainability

by Huyền @ Bel Gà

Ho Chi Minh City, July 1, 2017—IFC, a member of the World Bank Group, has signed an advisory agreement with Bel Gà JSC., a leading poultry breeding firm, and launched its Vietnam Food Safety Project that aims to address food safety standards and practices in the country. Improving the quality of food products will help […]

The post IFC Supports to Improve Food Safety in Vietnam, Enhancing Agribusiness Sustainability appeared first on Bel Gà .

Foie gras

Foie gras

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Foie gras offers a fascinating insight into the role of politics in food — which happens to be the subtitle of a new book by Michaela DeSoucey, a sociologist who got caught up in foie gras just before the topic exploded all over the food scene in Chicago.

Food safety crisis in Vietnam - Tuoi Tre News

Food safety crisis in Vietnam - Tuoi Tre News


Tuoi Tre News

The food industry in Vietnam is really self-regulated until there is a serious problem

Discovering Sapa: A Comprehensive Guide to Visiting Vietnam’s Northern Hill Station

by Juliana Hahn @ The Christina's Blog

Sapa is famous for its beautiful landscapes full of verdant rice paddies, rolling hills, Vietnam’s highest mountain, and hidden trails in overgrown valleys. While the idea of coming here for a trek far off from the noise and pollution of the big cities inspires wanderlust, organizing it all can be a bit daunting, especially for […]

The post Discovering Sapa: A Comprehensive Guide to Visiting Vietnam’s Northern Hill Station appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

A second helping of citrus in Italy

A second helping of citrus in Italy

by @ Eat This Podcast

This episode is a repeat of one first published in October 2014, and the reason is that it has been nominated for a James Beard Foundation Award. I'm utterly thrilled by the news, and gratified that more people have downloaded episodes and subscribed to the show. Strangely (at least to me) the original did not see huge renewed interest, which is why I thought it worthwhile repeating. If you've heard it, and don't feel like listening again, you could go and listen to one of the other two nominees, in the notes below. Being nominated is an immense honour. I won't know whether I have actually won until the award ceremony on 24 April. The original show notes:Citrus, thanks to what writer Helena Attlee calls their great “suggestibility,” confound the botanist and the shopper alike. What is the difference between a clementine and a mandarin? That was one of the few questions I didn’t ask Helena Attlee when we met recently to talk about citrus in Italy, the subject of her new book The Land Where Lemons Grow. And not just lemons. Attlee writes beautifully about all the citrus and all of Italy, from Lake Garda in the north to Palermo in the south. She covers not merely the tendency of citrus to interbreed and mutate, but also history and economics, culture, cooking and organised crime. Through it all runs a continuous thread that links the very difficulties of growing citrus productively to the desirability of the finished products, on which fortunes and entire communities were built. The Land Where Lemons Grow proves, as if it needed proving, that food provides a perfect lens through which to view the entire world, as a result of which I had to cut some choice sections from our conversation. That, however, has prompted me to try something new here, which will become apparent in a day or two as I also attempt to tidy up a bit here. Notes More about Helena Attlee at her website The other award nominees are Gravy and The Feed. Intro music by Podington Bear.

Eat This Newsletter 054

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

A roundup suitable for this day of celebration, with artisans, bots of toil and food for raven and vulture alike.

A brief history of Irish butter

A brief history of Irish butter

by @ Eat This Podcast

The Butter Museum in Cork, Ireland, features on some lists of the world’s quirky etc. food museums but not others. It ought to be on all of them. This is a seriously interesting museum for anyone who likes butter, and in my book, that means just about everyone. (I refuse absolutely to say anything about the impact – if any – of butter on health, not least because there’s nothing certain one can say.) It sits next to the grand Butter Exchange, built when the Cork Butter Market sat like a colossus astride the global market. The Irish butter traded through Cork was done in by refrigeration, fell to the lowest level possible, and then emerged again after Ireland joined the European Union, by returning to the principles that made the Cork Butter Exchange great. The Butter Museum tells the whole story. This episode tells a bit of it. Notes Regina Sexton is @culinaryireland on Twitter. The Cork Butter Museum really is worth a visit. The banner photograph is my own, and the butter curls are by Dennis Miyashiro, used with permission. I snarfed the music from SoundCloud. I still have no idea how permissions there work.

Australia: where healthier diets are cheaper …

Australia: where healthier diets are cheaper …

by @ Eat This Podcast

Australians devote almost 60 cents of every dollar they spend on food to unhealthy stuff. They could eat better for less money, but "affordable luxuries" get in the way.

Food & Water Watch urges continuation of catfish inspections

by News Desk @ Vietnam – Food Safety News

An activist group says the rejection of 40,000 pounds of catfish from Vietnam is the best evidence possible that Congress should not kill the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s new inspection program. “The (USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service) catfish inspection program is working and needs to continue in operation because it is preventing foodborne illness... Continue Reading

Food Safety Summit: Growing Markets for Vietnamese Products

Food Safety Summit: Growing Markets for Vietnamese Products


AmCham Vietnam

View and download the presentation View the online Conference Book (English) with Presentations View the online Conference Book (Vietnamese) with Presentations Photo Album Media clips   click the l…

Perdue Foods recalls chicken fritters for undeclared eggs

by News Desk @ Food Safety News

Perdue Foods LLC of Monterey, TN, is recalling ready-to-cook chicken breast tenderloin fritters for misbranding and undeclared egg, which is a known allergen. The chicken products were packaged with the wrong labels, according to the recall notice posted by the USDA’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS). Federal law requires foods containing known allergens to... Continue Reading

Food safety is most concerned issue of Vietnamese people

Food safety is most concerned issue of Vietnamese people


Indochina Research

Food safety is most concerned issue of Vietnamese people according to End of Year survey by Indochina Research conducted in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City

Food safety control remains challenging

Food safety control remains challenging


vietnamlawmagazine.vn

Rising violations of food safety law have triggered public worry while concerned authorities appeared inactive in redressing the situation, Phuong Lien and Dinh Hang of the Tin tuc Cuoi tuan (Weekend News) reported.

Garum brought up to date

Garum brought up to date

by @ Eat This Podcast

Garum is one of those ancient foods that everyone seems to have heard of. It is usually described as “fermented fish guts,” or something equally unappealing, and people often call it the Roman ketchup, because they used it so liberally on so many things. Fermented fish guts is indeed accurate, though calculated to distance ourselves from it. And garum is just one form of fermented fish; there’s also liquamen, muria. allec and haimation. All this I learned from Laura Kelley, author of The Silk Road Gourmet. Unlike most of the people who opine on garum, and who offer recipes for quick garum, she painstakingly created the real deal. She is also convinced that it isn’t really Roman in origin. We only think of it that way because history is written by the victors not the vanquished. And then there's the whole question of the Asian fish sauces, Vietnamese nước mắm and the rest of them. Independent discovery, or copied from the Romans? Notes Laura gives a full blow-by-blow on her website. Copying her is probably the only way to produce something that approximates genuine garum. She also mentioned colatura, a fish sauce still made in Italy. I haven’t tried it, although it is available, at least in the US, by mail order. Photo of the garum vats in Baelo Claudia by Janet Mendel.

Australia: where healthier diets are cheaper …

Australia: where healthier diets are cheaper …

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

Australians devote almost 60 cents of every dollar they spend on food to unhealthy stuff. They could eat better for less money, but "affordable luxuries" get in the way.

Backpackers and their food

Backpackers and their food

by @ Eat This Podcast

When you’re on holiday, or just away from home, do you seek out the “authentic” local food, or look for a reassuringly familar logo? Backpackers, keen to distinguish themselves from the vulgar hordes who are merely on holiday, seek out the authentic, at least to begin with. Dr Emily Falconer has been studying women backpackers. That’s her in the photo, doing a little field research over a bowl of something exotic in Thailand. And she says that while they start out seeking the grottiest places to eat, after they’ve been on the road for a while, their thoughts stray guiltily to familiar, comforting foods. I know the feeling Emily Falconer didn’t set out to study backpackers and food, but soon discovered that no matter what the subject, the people she was talking to sooner or later brought up food. I’m no exception, and although I’ve never been a great backpacker myself, I do prefer to seek out reasonably local eating places where I can, and I’ve had some memorable meals as a result. The most memorable of those was in Kunming, China, where I detached myself from the group I was with and went in search of something to eat. I didn't find it at the food fair that was on at the same time, but in the end I fetched up in a place so authentic it didn’t even have photographs of the food. I indicated to the waiter that I was hungry and he brought me food. I had no idea what any of it was, and aside from one soupy dish that was almost too hot even for me, it was all delicious. Next time I might take with me a book, this book. Notes Emily Falconer is a senior research assistant at the Weeks Centre for Social and Policy Research at London South Bank University. Her paper is Transformations of the backpacking food tourist: Emotions and conflicts. She also mentioned Food in tourism: Attraction and Impediment, by Erik Cohen and Nir Avieli. Intro music, as ever, by Dan-O at DanoSongs.com. While Jimmy Buffet – and how appropriate is that? – provided the outro music.

Pig food

by Jeremy Cherfas @ Eat This Podcast

I expect the data are better for pig feed than for human food

A tasting menu

A tasting menu

by @ Eat This Podcast

The first episode of 2014 is a look back to some of the topics I covered in 2013, and for what I hope is a good reason. With a podcast, unlike a piece of writing or an image, it is very hard to decide quickly whether this is something I want to pursue further. Of course some things are an instant turn-off: really bad audio quality will usually send me packing, as will a pile of unedited ramblings no matter how good the audio quality. Aside from that, though, it takes time to listen to a podcast and decide whether I want to hear more. With that in mind, I put together this tasting menu from 2013, to give new listeners an idea of what Eat This Podcast is about. So, what is it about? I'm not exactly sure. Looking at the world through a food lens, I sometimes say. As I was putting this selection together, though, some other themes emerged. I'm not really ready to share those in detail, but they might colour my selection of topics in the future. I should add, too, that I welcome any and all suggestions. If you've been listening since episode 1, you have my permission to ignore this one. Or you could share it with someone who isn't yet a listener. That would be good. And here's to 2014.

Nordesk expands it service range

by Robert @ Nordesk – Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam

We are happy to announce that we are expanding our services in Vietnam with Brand Ninja – a branding and digital marketing agency. Brand ninja support its customer be offering the following services: Digital Brand Development Digital Marketing services including Search and social media marketing Website Development. Brand Ninja has the same objective than Finnse

The post Nordesk expands it service range appeared first on Nordesk - Sales force outsourcing in Vietnam.

Jimmy Johns pulls sprouts from all 2,727 franchise locations

by Dan Flynn @ Food Safety News

Jimmy Johns Friday did something it has done in the past after one or more of its sandwich franchises was linked to an outbreak of foodborne illnesses: It ordered sprouts temporarily off the menu at all of its locations. In a statement, Jimmy Johns management said the temporary sprout ban is a “precautionary measure” while... Continue Reading

Vietnam : End of Year Survey – Open for subscription

by indochinaresearch @ Indochina Research

  The End of Year survey is a yearly opportunity to feel the opinion pulse of the population of Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, the two most populated and economic centers of the country. Ongoing since 1977, WIN/Gallup International has always considered that giving a Voice to the People is one of the responsibilities […]

The post Vietnam : End of Year Survey – Open for subscription appeared first on Indochina Research.

Food tours and cooking classes

Food tours and cooking classes

by @ Eat This Podcast

It is quite amazing how popular food tours and cooking classes are in Italy. When in Rome, many people seem to want to eat, and cook, like a Roman. Well, not entirely, and not like some Romans. I spoke to Francesca Flore, who offers both tours and cooking classes, and she reserved some choice words for those quintessential Roman dishes based on the famous quinto quarto, the fifth quarter of the carcass. Or, less obtusely, offal. Francesca told me that she's always been interested in food, and that while working in London she decided to take herself off to Australia to study Cooking and Patisserie at the Cordon Bleu School in Sydney. Back in Rome, she put all that knowledge to use catering private parties and branching out into food tours and cooking classes. We talked about what people want, what they get, and how she views the past and future of Italian food. Notes Francesca Flore’s flash website gives a taste of the food tours and cooking classes she offers. The Mercato Central in Florence has a website that is way too groovy for its own good. And, wonderfully Italian, an undated entry at a site called Florence Online, tells us both that the upstairs is closed and that “the vendors appear to want to stay where they are” in a tent below. Cover photograph, of Francesca supervising the sprinkling of icing sugar on cannoli, by Chris Warde-Jones for the New York Times.

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