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Vietnamese Holiday Food - New Year (Tet) Holidays - All About Vietnamese Cuisine

Vietnamese Holiday Food - New Year (Tet) Holidays - All About Vietnamese Cuisine


All About Vietnamese Cuisine

must-have dishes during the Vietnamese New Year holidays

5 Street Food Tips for Safely Savouring the Flavours of Asia

by Amanda Carlea @ Buffalo Tours Travel Blog

Street food is an important aspect of anyone’s travels to Asia. Not only is it widespread, locally sourced, produced and consumed, it reflects longstanding culture and culinary tradition. There are a variety of informal instructions that can be followed, or safety rules for keeping a happy tummy, however, we’ve condensed it down to 5 easy […]

Takeaway Tales: Is Kinton Ramen as good at home as in the restaurant?

Takeaway Tales: Is Kinton Ramen as good at home as in the restaurant?

by Corey Mintz @ Toronto Life

We're taste-testing popular delivery dishes and evaluating the apps that bring the food to your door

A Foodie’s Guide to Hue, Vietnam

by Sue Nguyen @ The Christina's Blog

Come to Hue and Eat like a Local Hue City is the old capital of Vietnam. Despite its location – next to Da Nang – the new economic center, Hue is calm and peaceful in a unique way. If you want to have a truly relaxing travel experience, Hue is definitely the city you must […]

The post A Foodie’s Guide to Hue, Vietnam appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

Penn State Officials Went to Jail Over Jerry San dusky. Could That Happen at Michigan State Over Larry Nassar?

Penn State Officials Went to Jail Over Jerry San dusky. Could That Happen at Michigan State Over Larry Nassar?

by Ben Mathis-Lilley @ Slate Articles

On Wednesday afternoon in Lansing, Michigan, disgraced Michigan State and USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar was sentenced to 40 to 175 years in state prison for the seven counts of first-degree criminal sexual conduct to which he’s pleaded guilty. (That’s on top of a sentence of 60 years in prison for pleading guilty to federal child pornography charges; Nassar also awaits sentencing on criminal sexual conduct charges in a different Michigan county.) Over the last week, 156 of Nassar’s victims either spoke in court or had their statements read aloud. Many of them have condemned USA Gymnastics and Michigan State officials for failing to seriously investigate early complaints against Nassar, with the first allegations of inappropriate behavior—which were reportedly made to a Michigan State coach—as early as 1997. The Detroit News and Michigan State’s student newspaper have both, in recent issues, called on Michigan State president Lou Anna Simon to resign.

The nature of Nassar’s crimes, and the focus on Simon and other school officials who supervised him, obviously calls to mind the Jerry Sandusky sexual abuse scandal at Penn State. In that case, the university’s president, vice president, and athletic director were all sentenced to jail terms for their failure to alert law enforcement officials to a 2001 report that Sandusky had been seen behaving inappropriately with a young boy in a shower at the school’s football facility. (Penn State administrators are known to have been made aware of potentially inappropriate behavior by Sandusky, an assistant coach, in 1998, and other victims have said they told football coach Joe Paterno they were abused by Sandusky as early as 1971. Sandusky was not banned from Penn State facilities until he was arrested in 2011.)

How does Michigan State’s institutional response to Nassar compare to the way Penn State handled Sandusky?

An extensive Detroit News report published last week, based on testimony and interviews with victims, lists the following occasions on which Michigan State employees were allegedly told that Nassar may have committed sexual abuse:

• In 1997, a high school gymnast allegedly told an unidentified youth coach and MSU gymnastics coach Kathy Klages that Nassar had abused her. A second, unidentified youth gymnast allegedly told Klages at a subsequent group meeting that she had also been abused. Klages declined to comment on the News’ story.

• In 1999, a track/cross-country runner allegedly told an assistant coach named Kelli Bert that Nassar abused her. Bert says she does not remember ever being told Nassar had abused anyone.

• In 2000, a softball player allegedly told trainers Lianna Hadden and Destiny Teachnor-Hauk that Nassar had abused her. In 2002, a volleyball player allegedly told Hadden that Nassar had made her uncomfortable during a treatment. Teachnor-Hauk has denied receiving any such complaints; Hadden declined to comment to the News.

• In 2004, two individuals allegedly told a MSU clinical psychologist named Gary Stollak that Nassar had abused their young daughter. Stollak, who is retired, says he suffered a stroke in 2016 and does not remember anything about the alleged incident.

• In 2014, a MSU alumnus told a school doctor named Jeff Kovan that Nassar may have abused her.

Klages and Stollak, victims say, told Nassar about the allegations against him. But neither they nor Hadden, Teachnor-Hauk, or Bert appear to have reported any concerns to the university’s police department or its Title IX officials, who are tasked with ensuring that the campus maintains a safe and non-discriminatory environment for women. Kovan, the school doctor, did report the allegation he heard from an MSU alumnus to the school’s Title IX office , whose 2014 investigation cleared Nassar after three other doctors (and Teachnor-Hauk) said in interviews that Nassar’s techniques were medically appropriate. The Lansing State Journal reported last year that one of those doctors, Brooke Lemmen, subsequently resigned after the university learned she had failed to alert anyone else on campus after being told in July 2015—that is, after she’d helped clear Nassar during Michigan State’s investigation—that USA Gymnastics was also investigating him. Nassar was not fired by Michigan State until September 2016, after an Indianapolis Star article detailed allegations of abuse against him.

As to whether any of these actions may have been illegal, victims’ lawyers have said, without naming specific employees, that Michigan State staffers failed to fulfill their obligations under laws and rules that mandate the reporting of sexual assault accusations to appropriate authorities. Michigan State’s administration has responded by saying it has “no reason to believe” that any criminal violations by anyone other than Nassar took place. Last week, however, the university’s trustees sent Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette a letter asking him to investigate the school’s handling of Nassar, and Schuette said in a statement that his office will conduct a “full and complete review” of the situation.

The ambiguous nature of the laws concerning child endangerment will make any potential prosecutions complicated. The Penn State administrators who were sentenced in in the Sandusky case were convicted under a broadly worded Pennsylvania statute titled “Endangering welfare of children”:

A parent, guardian or other person supervising the welfare of a child under 18 years of age, or a person that employs or supervises such a person, commits an offense if he knowingly endangers the welfare of the child by violating a duty of care, protection or support.

Former Penn State president Graham Spanier is appealing his conviction, arguing (among other things) that he could not have been reasonably expected, as a university president, to have a “duty of care” over the abuse victim, a minor who had been brought on campus by Sandusky in the coach’s capacity as a youth charity volunteer.

Michigan’s child abuse statute, meanwhile, is even more ambiguous on what constitutes a criminal failure to report potential abuse. Jordan Harris, who has practiced education and labor law in Michigan and now manages legal issues for a large Detroit-area school district, suggested to me that this section might be the most relevant:

(7) A person is guilty of child abuse in the fourth degree if any of the following apply:

(a) The person’s omission or reckless act causes physical harm to a child.

(b) The person knowingly or intentionally commits an act that under the circumstances poses an unreasonable risk of harm or injury to a child, regardless of whether physical harm results.

Even here, however, “omission” is specifically defined as “a willful failure to provide food, clothing, or shelter.” Harris says prosecution under the statute would be a “stretch,” but notes that there is also a Michigan statute called the Child Protection Law that specifically lists categories of people, among them “teachers” and “school administrators,” who are legally obligated to tell state authorities about the potential abuse of minors. Yet that law, too, is ambiguous. Harris pointed me to Michigan State’s own guidelines on the Child Protection Law, which state (correctly, Harris told me) that “Michigan courts have not yet addressed the status of university faculty, academic advisors, and administrators as mandated reporters.” (One more fact worth noting: Not all of Nassar’s victims were minors.)

Title IX, meanwhile, is its own mess. The role of Title IX offices in combatting sexual assault has developed relatively recently and been the subject of a great deal of confusion and controversy. While the Title IX gender-equity law itself was passed in 1972, a federal guideline asserting that “the requirements of Title IX pertaining to sexual harassment also cover sexual violence” was only issued in 2011—and then substantially revised by the Trump administration in 2017. Michigan State’s current policy mandates that coaches and trainers report allegations of sexual misconduct to the school’s Title IX office. But no matter what an investigation of Michigan State officials’ behavior were to uncover, Title IX does not authorize criminal penalties. If authorities eventually conclude that MSU violated Title IX, however, the school could potentially lose some federal funding.

Finally, there’s the NCAA, which announced Tuesday that it would investigate Michigan State’s handling of Nassar. But the NCAA is a private organization whose punishment of the university would only extend to its participation in college athletics, and even its jurisdiction over those matters has been on shaky ground in recent years as it’s faced heavy criticism for its inept and inconsistent handling of a number of scandals—including, most prominently, the one at Penn State.

At the moment, it seems like the most likely avenue for significant punishment against Michigan State officials and staffers who failed to report Nassar allegations would be a Child Protection Law prosecution. As Harris cautions, though, that wouldn’t be a sure thing even if the failures alleged in the Detroit News article could be proven in court. “This could be an issue where this is the test case, ” he says. “There would be litigation over whether [the law] applied to community colleges and universities. It would be a novel legal question—they could make that allegation, and then it would be up to the court to decide.”

Update, 1:40 p.m.: While he wasn’t the recipient of a direct report about Nassar, this piece also should’ve mentioned William Strampel, the former dean of the Michigan State College of Osteopathic Medicine. As Nassar’s boss, Strampel told him after he was cleared by the university’s 2014 Title IX investigation that he would be required to have an observer present whenever he performed “sensitive” procedures on patients. Multiple accounts, however, indicate that Strampel did not follow up to make sure this new rule was followed and that Nassar continued to see—and molest—some patients without an observer.

Strampel, Kovan, and Klages, meanwhile, are among those named as defendants in nine civil lawsuits filed by Nassar victims which are being handled collectively as a single case in federal court . The suits also name Michigan State itself as a defendant; the school has moved to have the cases dismissed.

10 Best Authentic Food Travel Experiences in 2017

by Rosemary @ Authentic Food Quest

The post 10 Best Authentic Food Travel Experiences in 2017 appeared first on Authentic Food Quest.

Chefs in the Burbs: The most popular hidden food gems of 2017

Chefs in the Burbs: The most popular hidden food gems of 2017

by Toronto Life @ Toronto Life

A year in the burbs

Get Off the Beaten Track in Hue, Vietnam

by Phuong Thuy @ The Christina's Blog

Located on the bank of Perfume River, this city is the capital of Thua Thien Hue province, 700 kilometers to the south of Hanoi. Although you can visit Hue at any time of the year, the most charming season is surely from March to August, especially March through April when the temperature is at its […]

The post Get Off the Beaten Track in Hue, Vietnam appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

The Best Unique Food Gifts for Food Travelers

by Claire @ Authentic Food Quest

The post The Best Unique Food Gifts for Food Travelers appeared first on Authentic Food Quest.

What to Eat at Newton Food Centre

by Lydia Lee @ TripZilla Magazine

Listen To Food Republic Today: Alex Raij

by Tiffany @ Food Republic

Be sure to subscribe to Food Republic Today on Apple Podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts. And please rate the podcast and leave comments! Subscribe: Apple | Stitcher | Spotify | TuneIn Chef Alex Raij is a boss. She runs three restaurants and a café in New York, co-wrote a cookbook with her husband and chef/partner Ener Montero, and raises her little ones. Raij and Montero’s La […]

The post Listen To Food Republic Today: Alex Raij appeared first on Food Republic.

Cooking for the Prime Minister of New Zealand

by PA @ Danang Cuisine

  Recently, I had the honor of serving Vietnamese food at my Nén Restaurant to H.E Ms Jacinda Ardern, the Prime Minister of New Zealand during the #APEC2017 week in Da Nang. She is the world’s youngest female head of government, having taken office at age 37. As I am also working in an extremely […]

Things to Do in Puerto Escondido — Fun Things to Do in Oaxaca, Mexico’s Southern Port

by Jason Jenkins @ An Epic Education

Out of all the things to do in Puerto Escondido, sunsets may be our favorite, but there’s much more to this sleepy Mexican beach town than that. Much more. Beautiful beaches, fantastic food, incredible wildlife, and a laid-back surfer vibe. There are lots of reasons to visit Puerto Escondido, in Mexico’s southern state of Oaxaca. […]

The post Things to Do in Puerto Escondido — Fun Things to Do in Oaxaca, Mexico’s Southern Port appeared first on An Epic Education.

Shrimp (Camerones) Aquachiles

by The Ravenous Couple @ The Ravenous Couple

We’re big fans of seafood—raw, barely cooked, grilled, fried or smoked—we can’t seem to get enough of it. Of the methods we just listed, barely cooked is one method we’re particularly fond of especially when you have access to fresh quality seafood. What do we mean by barely cooked? We suppose it could mean cooking […]

[Review] – Two Day Trip To Tay Ninh

by Kazuki Nishioka @ Vietnam Track

Hello everyone, and Happy New Year 2018! On January 13th and 14th, we had an exciting and memorable two-day trip

The post [Review] – Two Day Trip To Tay Ninh appeared first on Vietnam Track.

The Best Homestays in Sapa (For An Authentic & Personal Experience)

by Phuong Thuy @ The Christina's Blog

H’mong, Dao, and Giay people speaking English more fluently than Vietnamese, tremendous natural vistas right outside your balcony, an early morning chill with clouds hovering over the mountains, this and more is what you should expect from Sapa! Located on the northern border of Vietnam, Sapa is the only region of the country that has […]

The post The Best Homestays in Sapa (For An Authentic & Personal Experience) appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

Hanoi Style Salmon with Turmeric and Dill

by The Ravenous Couple @ The Ravenous Couple

Cha Ca Thanh Long is one of our favorite Vietnamese dishes and we’ve already wrote about it here, but this time we’re back with similar recipe but a slight twist. Traditionally this dish is made in small portions with cut filet of snakehead or catfish cooked table side or on a sizzling fajita style pan, […]

Boiled Peanuts Recipe [Seasoned With Salt]

by Huy @ Vietnamese Appetizers & Snacks – HungryHuy.com

Many Vietnamese people fled their home country after the Vietnam War and ended up in Louisiana. The Vietnamese were exposed to new, local foods resulting in some current mainstays of Vietnamese cuisine, such as Cajun crawfish boil, chicory in Vietnamese coffee and of course, boiled peanuts. These are popularly boiled with just salt, or with Cajun spices, but in this recipe we’re […]

The post Boiled Peanuts Recipe [Seasoned With Salt] appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

11 Stories That Will Inspire Your Next Culinary Trip To LA

by Food Republic @ Food Republic

Los Angeles is hot hot hot, both in temperature, attractiveness and food scene. Add phenomenal hiking, buzzing concert venues, outstanding hotel and accommodation options — we’re looking at you, Airbnb — and recreational pot (there, we said it) and you’re set for the kind of good time that keeps you coming back again and again. […]

The post 11 Stories That Will Inspire Your Next Culinary Trip To LA appeared first on Food Republic.

How Foreigners React While Trying Durian, The Smelliest Fruit In The World!?

by vietnamesecuisine @ All About Vietnamese Cuisine

In this quick post, I will gather YouTube videos about how foreigners react while trying durian, the smelliest fruit in the world. What makes durian so different from other fruits is that most people hated at their first tries, but

The post How Foreigners React While Trying Durian, The Smelliest Fruit In The World!? appeared first on All About Vietnamese Cuisine.

5 Must-try Dishes to Eat Like a Local in Fiji

by TripZilla @ TripZilla Magazine

Q&A: New York Times food editor Sam Sifton on Toronto restaurants and why the newspaper just did an entire section on Canadian cuisine

Q&A: New York Times food editor Sam Sifton on Toronto restaurants and why the newspaper just did an entire section on Canadian cuisine

by Courtney Shea @ Toronto Life

We spoke to Sifton about all things Canuck

Socially Responsible Travel in Hanoi (Travel and Give Back to the Community)

by Sue Nguyen @ The Christina's Blog

The phrase “socially responsible travel” is a new trend followed by travelers all over the world, in the context that traveling and experiencing new cultures is popular nowadays. Hanoi, renown for the chaotic Old Quarter, many little temples, Dong Xuan Market that sells household goods and street food, already has so much to offer. However, […]

The post Socially Responsible Travel in Hanoi (Travel and Give Back to the Community) appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

The Best Places to Eat in Seattle Washington

by Daryl & Mindi Hirsch @ 2foodtrippers

Seattle is known around the world for its coffee culture, the Space Needle and Pike Place Market. But what about Seattle restaurants? We’ve asked a local expert to share her picks for the best places to eat in Seattle Washington. Read on to find out how to eat like a local in this wonderful Pacific Northwestern city. Seattle is famous for its cutting-edge coffee culture. But coffee is just one aspect of Seattle’s culinary landscape. Locals dine at the best restaurants in Seattle, shop at Pike Place Market for some of the ...

The post The Best Places to Eat in Seattle Washington appeared first on 2foodtrippers.

19 Reasons South Korean Food is the Most Delicious

by Katie McGrain @ Around the World in KT Days

From street food to comfort food to drinking food to temple food - the cuisine in South Korea is diverse and delicious. Cooking meat yourself, eating food off sticks, and eating kimchi for breakfast are all food experiences you can expect to have in South Korea. These 19 reasons  highlight why South Korean food is [...]

The post 19 Reasons South Korean Food is the Most Delicious appeared first on Around the World in KT Days.

7 Must-Eat Foods In Seoul During Winter

by Teri Anne Tan @ TripZilla Magazine

Press release: Successful first year for Bilfinger Tebodin United Kingdom

by @ Newsfeed Tebodin B.V.

The UK office of global consulting and engineering firm, Tebodin, part of Bilfinger, has celebrated their first year of operations with new projects within the industrial and food sectors which will pave the way for further expansion in 2018.

Vietnam food | Travel guide | Audley Travel

Vietnam food | Travel guide | Audley Travel


Audley Travel

Audley specialist, Lauren picks some of her top Vietnamese food to try when visiting Vietnam.

Healthy Vietnamese Food That's Lower in Calories

Healthy Vietnamese Food That's Lower in Calories


Verywell

Learn quick tips to find healthy Vietnamese food in restaurants, at the grocery store and even make low-calorie Vietnamese food at home.

Thang Co – Unique Food In Sapa

by Trang Nguyen @ Vietnam Track

Located in Vietnam’s northwestern remote mountains, Sapa is famous for not only its stunning hidden landscapes but its wide variety

The post Thang Co – Unique Food In Sapa appeared first on Vietnam Track.

Quiz: What Kind of Food Traveler Are You?

by Rosemary @ Authentic Food Quest

The post Quiz: What Kind of Food Traveler Are You? appeared first on Authentic Food Quest.

Recipe: Grilled pork sandwich -Bánh mì thịt nướng

by Helen Le @ Danang Cuisine

Recipe: Grilled pork sandwich - Bánh mì thịt nướng By Helen Le Published: December 30, 2017Prep: 20 minsCook: 30 minsReady In: 50 minsYield: 3-5 (3 Servings)"Banh mi thit nuong" which is Vietnamese sandwich with grilled pork, is the special version of "banh mi". This is one of the most popular breakfast in Vietnam. Bánh mì […]

Moc Chau Plum Flowers Season: White Heaven On Earth

by Minh Nguyen @ Vietnam Track

Like a painting with pure white theme, plum flowers in Moc Chau are making many people trembling with excitement. Do

The post Moc Chau Plum Flowers Season: White Heaven On Earth appeared first on Vietnam Track.

All Things You Need To Know About Cao Bang

by Linh Dang @ Vietnam Track

Today, Vietnam Track Team will introduce you a well-known attractive travel destination – a place far away from hustle metropolitan

The post All Things You Need To Know About Cao Bang appeared first on Vietnam Track.

Bottoms Up – Budapest Ruin Bars and Beyond

by Daryl & Mindi Hirsch @ 2foodtrippers

Feeling thirsty in Hungary? Check out our favorite places to drink including hip Budapest ruin bars plus cool spots for beer, cocktails and wine. Finding a bar in Budapest is like finding hay in a haystack. The Hungarian capital has a lot of drinking establishments, many filled with young professionals and visiting tourists. Though infamous for its funky ruin bars, the river split city also has traditional pubs, classy wine lounges and even spa bars. Yes, you can imbibe at Budapest bars while getting your soak on. We visited our first (but ...

The post Bottoms Up – Budapest Ruin Bars and Beyond appeared first on 2foodtrippers.

Vietnamese Food: 25 Must-Eat Dishes in Saigon (and Where To Try Them)

Vietnamese Food: 25 Must-Eat Dishes in Saigon (and Where To Try Them)


Migrationology - Food Travel Blog

Vietnamese food is an insanely delicious cuisine. Here are 25 Vietnamese dishes you need to try, and restaurants to eat them in Saigon.

Getting Around in Hue, Vietnam

by Phuc Nguyen @ The Christina's Blog

Hue is the famous Imperial city of Central Vietnam, the throne of the Nguyen Dynasty from 1802 to 1945. Old and tranquil, Hue is frozen in time, standing amongst the remnants of a once glorious Asian empire. Because of this, getting around Hue is intriguing with many options available, and sights to see. A major […]

The post Getting Around in Hue, Vietnam appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

62 Reasons to Visit Seoul ASAP

by Katie McGrain @ Around the World in KT Days

The fast pace, the history, the dramatic scenery, the food. My home for the last few years is the buzzing, pulsing, history-packed city of Seoul, South Korea. When you visit Seoul, you don’t have to choose between exploring a city or being in nature - you can have it all! With the winter Olympics [...]

The post 62 Reasons to Visit Seoul ASAP appeared first on Around the World in KT Days.

Vietnamese Food - What to Eat in Vietnam

Vietnamese Food - What to Eat in Vietnam


vietnam-guide.com

In the past few years Vietnamese food has become more and more popular around the world. Food lovers may have tried the two best known Vietnamese dishes – spring rolls and bread rolls. Rice, noodles, fresh vegetable and herbs all play big roles in Vietnamese food, making it

Vietnamese Spring Rolls Recipe (Gỏi cuốn)

by Huy @ Vietnamese Appetizers & Snacks – HungryHuy.com

This traditional Vietnamese Spring Roll recipe (gỏi cuốn) is a fresh and healthy recipe, full of veggies, lean meat, and shrimp so you can chow down with less guilt :). Made from just rice and water, the rice paper (bánh tráng) could be easily used for lots of other things. At one Vietnamese market, over five brands of this stuff. […]

The post Vietnamese Spring Rolls Recipe (Gỏi cuốn) appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

Eat Like a Local: Vietnamese Snack Foods | Buffalo Tours Travel Blog

Eat Like a Local: Vietnamese Snack Foods | Buffalo Tours Travel Blog


Buffalo Tours Travel Blog

Sick of noodle soups? Discover the variety of tasty Vietnamese snack foods with the help of Buffalo Tours expert and loal Thu Phan.

Where to Eat in Budapest Hungary – The Best Budapest Restaurants, Cafes and Markets

by Daryl & Mindi Hirsch @ 2foodtrippers

Wondering what and where to eat in Budapest Hungary? We spent a month eating our way through the sprawling Hungarian capital city. Check out our Budapest Food Guide with the best Budapest restaurants, cafes and markets. Four weeks of eating our way through Budapest was overwhelming. The Hungarian capital’s food scene, with its never-ending selection of restaurants, cafes and markets, kept us constantly on the go. But with the help of our and lots of third wave coffee, we survived a month of hearty eating without sacrificing our sanity or waistlines. ...

The post Where to Eat in Budapest Hungary – The Best Budapest Restaurants, Cafes and Markets appeared first on 2foodtrippers.

5 Must Eat Vietnamese Street Food Snacks You Don't Want To Miss On Your Trip To Saigon

5 Must Eat Vietnamese Street Food Snacks You Don't Want To Miss On Your Trip To Saigon


Back of the Bike Tours

The little brother of the infamous Vietnamese Spring Roll a.k.a Goi Cuon, Bo Bia is one of the easiest snacks to find when walking down the street of Ho Chi Minh City. This spring roll packs a unique punch of flavor and texture in comparison.

It’s Burger King’s Turn To Modernize

by Tiffany @ Food Republic

Restaurant Brands International Inc., owner of Burger King, Popeyes Louisiana Kitchen and Tim Hortons, is throwing its hat into the digital rat race. The company created a chief technology and development officer position and hired Josh Kobza to fill it, according to Bloomberg. Kobza has served as Restaurant Brands’ chief financial officer for the past […]

The post It’s Burger King’s Turn To Modernize appeared first on Food Republic.

What to Eat at Newton Food Centre

by Lydia Lee @ TripZilla Magazine

A Solid First-Class Experience On American Airlines’ New 737 MAX 8, NYC-Miami

A Solid First-Class Experience On American Airlines’ New 737 MAX 8, NYC-Miami

by JT Genter @ The Points Guy

I came into this flight prepared to hate it, but I was surprised to have a good experience. The well-designed seat provided plenty of storage, Wi-Fi was both fast and free, service was top-notch and the food/drink options were solid for a short domestic flight. Cons include a lack of in-flight entertainment screen, reduced seat padding and a slightly smaller bathroom.

Back Into the Quagmire

Back Into the Quagmire

by Fred Kaplan @ Slate Articles

As the Trump administration escalates America’s military involvement in Afghanistan and Syria, one wonders what happened to the Donald Trump who decried the former war as a “total disaster” and bellowed over and over “It’s time to come home”—and who pledged to do nothing in the latter war but “bomb the shit out of ISIS.”

Yet Trump is sending more troops to Afghanistan (the longest war in U.S. history) and broadening our mission in Syria (arguably the most complex conflict we’ve ever sleepwalked into).

What happened to Trump is that, however stubborn and overconfident he’s been on most matters he’s sounded off about (health care, climate change, immigration, protectionism), when it comes to the use of military force, he has deferred to his inner circle of generals.

In some ways, this has proved fortunate. Secretary of Defense James Mattis, a retired four-star Marine general, persuaded Trump, at least so far, not to resume the torture of suspected terrorists. Mattis and national security adviser H.R. McMaster, an active-duty three-star Army general, persuaded him—at least so far—not to rip up the Iran nuclear deal. Several senior officers in the Pentagon have briefed Trump, as they had briefed his predecessors, on the extreme risks of bombing North Korea.

But when it comes to Afghanistan (where both generals served time in uniform) and Syria (which involves Iran, which both consider the enemy), Mattis and McMaster are deeply committed to the cause—if not necessarily to winning, then certainly to avoid defeat. And so they did everything they could to convince Trump to pour in more weapons and troops, and Trump at last gave in.

In a televised speech in August, Trump said, “My original instinct was to pull out—and historically, I like following my instincts. But all my life I’ve heard that decisions are much different when you sit behind the desk in the Oval Office.” So, after “many meetings, over many months,” with “my Cabinet and generals,” he decided “to complete our strategy”—not just to refrain from pulling out but to pour in more troops and weapons.

Here was one time where Trump might have been wiser to follow his instincts—or at least to bring in a wider array of advisers, including some who could inform his instincts with facts and figures about all the many past assurances of victory’s imminence. But there were—and still are—no such experts on his team.

The “new strategy” that Trump articulated in the half-hour speech wasn’t so different from previous strategies. Even so, he concluded that, though he’d been dealt a bad hand, “one way or another, these problems will be solved—I’m a problem solver—and, in the end, we will win.”

He didn’t define “win” (nobody has, really, in the 16 years we’ve been fighting this war), but he seemed to suggest that he would do what it takes, and succeed, because he’d solved problems in his prior life as a real-estate tycoon—as if restoring peace and stability to one of the world’s most war-torn countries was on the same order of complexity as wrangling a permit from the New York City Department of Buildings.

President Obama left office with 8,400 U.S. troops in Afghanistan, down from a peak of 100,000. Under Trump, the number has risen to 15,000, with another 1,000 set to arrive this spring.

Fewer Americans have died there in the past few years, because they are serving more as advisers than as soldiers engaging in combat. But advisers get trapped in firefights, and, more to the point, the Afghan soldiers they’re advising haven’t made much progress in the fight. A case in point is the Taliban’s 14-hour siege this week of the Intercontinental Hotel in the capital, Kabul, killing 22 people. On another front, American pilots have stepped up the bombing of opium fields—a source of income for the Taliban—but the production of poppy last year nearly doubled.

In short, there is no end to the war in sight.

Syria is a different story, but no more hopeful. Early in his term, Trump eased up on the restrictions that Obama had placed on bombing in civilian areas, instead letting the commanders in the field set the rules of engagement. This may have accelerated the defeat of ISIS in the field and the collapse of its caliphate, but it has so far had little impact on the jihadis’ activities worldwide—and it has intensified the underlying conflicts in Syria.

The key fact about these conflicts is this: The United States is the only combatant in the country that views ISIS as the main threat and the destruction of ISIS as the main mission. All the other countries and factions view the threat of ISIS as secondary at best. Their main threats stem, instead, from long-simmering sectarian rivalries (mainly Sunni versus Shia) or territorial disputes (leftovers from the arbitrary borders set by European colonialists at the end of World War I). As a result, the local powers have played the United States, promising or pretending to join the fight against ISIS as long as we’ve helped them go after their main threats—i.e., as long as we help them pursue their vital interests. The problem is that the interests of some of these actors conflict with the interests of others. We can’t help them all without alienating some. As ISIS nears defeat, these deeper conflicts, which we’ve tried to finesse or submerge, rise uncomfortably to the fore.

And so we now stand by as Turkey, our NATO ally, wages a brutal fight against the Syrian Kurds, who have been our most reliable ally in the war on ISIS—a war, by the way, that isn’t entirely over. The U.S. commanders on the ground, who have been given such wide authority since Trump came to office, openly praise the Kurds. Meanwhile, White House officials, who are trying to patch relations with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, have noted that Turkey is our “ally” while the Kurds are merely our “partner” in a narrow combat operation, and allies trump partners. The Pentagon, which relies on Turkish air bases for NATO and counter-ISIS operations but has also been aiding the Kurds, released a statement trying to straddle both positions.

These tensions were bound to erupt as the fight against ISIS wound down. The Obama administration was taking steps (who knows how effective they would have been?) to anticipate the imbroglio. The Trump administration never did, in part because the top officials never set the priorities of a political-military strategy—in other words, never worked out a position on what the United States wanted to accomplish in Syria

And now the administration is digging in deeper. In a speech last week at Stanford University, Secretary of State Rex Tillerson said the United States “must maintain a military presence” in Syria in order to accomplish five goals: an “enduring defeat” of ISIS and al-Qaida, the ouster of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad through a “UN-led political process,” the diminishing of Iranian influence; the return of Syrian refugees; and the removal of all weapons of mass destruction.

These are all worthy goals, but it’s not at all clear how a U.S. military presence can accomplish them. Probably they can’t be accomplished without this presence, but the presence has to be tied to a strategy—and a strategy requires more than the mere recitation of worthy goals. It also requires the articulation of interests, the amassing of resources, the planning and execution of a policy—and, given that we have little leverage in Syria, it also requires compromise and coordination with other countries and militias. But which ones? Can we do all this without help from some combination of Russia, Iran, Turkey, the Kurds, and some indigenous forces within Syria—or perhaps all of them?

The problem is that the answer might be no. During the Obama administration, Secretary of State John Kerry assembled a diplomatic conference in Vienna comprised of 21 countries with an interest in the conflict. But they couldn’t get beyond a list of vague of principles, and, since then, the fissures have widened, our leverage has weakened, Assad’s grip on power has tightened, and the Iranian-backed militias that support him aren’t leaving anytime soon. Not even the WMDs are gone. In April, Trump fired 59 cruise missiles at a Syrian airbase to punish Assad for using chemical weapons against his own people. Trump (and some others) thought that did the trick. But just this week, Assad reportedly unleashed chemicals again.

We’ve seen this movie before. We send troops or drop bombs for what some think (and, in some cases, what might actually be) a good cause; the problem only worsens, so we send or drop more, devise a new strategy, then another new strategy (which, after a while, resembles one of the old strategies), and then just stay there, spiraling the violence upward, achieving occasional tactical triumphs but no strategic breakthroughs.

This is where Trump is at with these endless wars that he wanted no part of and berated his predecessor for dropping in his lap. But neither he nor his advisers have the slightest idea how to break through the stasis or pull out without exacerbating the chaos. Not to draw comparisons with Vietnam, which was a far deadlier and more thoroughly senseless war, but Trump is finding himself bogged down in the very definition of a quagmire.

7 Must-Eat Foods In Seoul During Winter

by Teri Anne Tan @ TripZilla Magazine

7-11 Thailand: Beyond The Ham & Cheese

by Allan Wilson @ Live Less Ordinary: Bangkok Based Bloggers Travelling in Asia & Beyond

Seven elevens are pretty much essential these days in Thailand, whether it’s expat paying bills, locals buying online purchases, or adventurous travelers indulging in...

The post 7-11 Thailand: Beyond The Ham & Cheese appeared first on Live Less Ordinary: Bangkok Based Bloggers Travelling in Asia & Beyond.

Vietnamese Holiday Food – New Year (Tet) Holidays

by vietnamesecuisine @ All About Vietnamese Cuisine

Every country has different traditions and holidays, but when it comes to holidays, we all have things in common. We celebrate and we eat. In this blog, I am going to introduce you the list of must-have Vietnamese dishes during

The post Vietnamese Holiday Food – New Year (Tet) Holidays appeared first on All About Vietnamese Cuisine.

7 Must-Eat Foods In Seoul During Winter

by Teri Anne Tan @ TripZilla Magazine

Vegan Breakfast Burritos

by Lisa Le @ The Viet Vegan

The post Vegan Breakfast Burritos appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

The older I get, the more I crave foods that I connect with nostalgia for some reason. I’m not even that old but it’s still something that draws me to the kitchen. My tastebuds crave these foods I had when I was younger, and they weren’t even really associated with good or fond memories, just […]

The post Vegan Breakfast Burritos appeared first on The Viet Vegan.

Best of 2017 – Our Food and Travel Favorites

by Daryl & Mindi Hirsch @ 2foodtrippers

2017 was a busy year for the 2foodtrippers. We traveled to three continents, 13 countries and too many cities to count. Check out the food and travel experiences that were our best of 2017. We began the year 2017 without definite plans. Perhaps we could plan our calendar way in advance as some ‘type A’ people probably do, but what’s the fun in that? Sometimes, we’re just hanging around our Naples, Italy apartment and, all of a sudden, the spark of travel shoots across our brains and, on a whim, we ...

The post Best of 2017 – Our Food and Travel Favorites appeared first on 2foodtrippers.

The Best Lunch Foods in Ho Chi Minh City

by fred wilson @ Back of the Bike Tours

What to eat for Lunch in Ho Chi Minh City a.k.a Saigon? Entering the world of Vietnamese food can be a daunting task for a beginner out there on their own. What is it? Where is it? Is it the best? These are the questions...

8 Street Snacks You Need to Eat in Hanoi

8 Street Snacks You Need to Eat in Hanoi


Around the World in KT Days

Eating the street food in Hanoi is where you want to spend you time. These 7 dishes are the perfect things to eat when you need a little pick me up!

Jeni’s Splendid Idea: Buy Ice Cream, Support “She Should Run”

by Jess Kapadia @ Food Republic

On February 3rd, head into any one of Jeni’s Splendid Ice Creams scoop shops across the country nice and early, and place your breakfast order. That’s right, it’s National Ice Cream For Breakfast Day, and Jeni’s is donating 50% of the morning’s sales to She Should Run. The Washington, D.C. not-for-profit organization seeks to encourage a quarter of a million women to run for public […]

The post Jeni’s Splendid Idea: Buy Ice Cream, Support “She Should Run” appeared first on Food Republic.

Heading up the Saigon SkyDeck

Heading up the Saigon SkyDeck

by backpackerlee @ backpackerlee

Sometimes southern Vietnam can get a little steamy – Saigon in particular – and heading up high to beat the crowds and look down on the masses can be a nice way to get a bit of ‘me time’. Luckily, Saigon has the Bitexco Financial Tower, a very modern skyscraper, that was opened in the […]

City Winery Heads To Puerto Rico For Hurricane Relief: This Week In Food Events

by Tiffany @ Food Republic

There’s nothing like enjoying a glass of wine or cocktail while also giving back to communities and supporting causes that are important to you. Find some options in New York, Atlanta, Chicago and more below! Then mark you calendar for the indoor block party that is the Meatpacking District’s annual Open Market. Brooklyn’s Leyanda continues […]

The post City Winery Heads To Puerto Rico For Hurricane Relief: This Week In Food Events appeared first on Food Republic.

Bánh Xèo – Savory Vietnamese Crêpes

by Huy @ Vietnamese Appetizers & Snacks – HungryHuy.com

Bánh xèo seems to be designed to be eaten as a family. The batter, filling ingredients, and veggies aren’t complicated to prepare, but they don’t make sense to be bought or made to be eaten by yourself. You don’t just buy 1/4 pound of pork, 8 shrimps, or buy 1/4 head of lettuce. You kind […]

The post Bánh Xèo – Savory Vietnamese Crêpes appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

Best Vietnamese food in Little Saigon: The top 25 dishes to eat

Best Vietnamese food in Little Saigon: The top 25 dishes to eat


Orange County Register

The scent of Little Saigon hits me in the face. An intoxicating perfume of jackfruit and bananas and the vanilla-y scent of pandanus leaves wraps itself around me in a warm, tight embrace. It’s a s…

Will These Biodegradable Bags Make It To The Mainstream?

by Tiffany @ Food Republic

To every hopeful tote-bag-carrying environmentalist, plastic bags’ days are numbered. Bans on bags are slowly sweeping nations and companies alike. And Indonesian-based Avani Eco is dedicated to making biodegradable bags out of yuca root. Avani Eco’s bags solve the problem of plastic harming animals when found in the seas because of its water-soluble properties. Since they’re made entirely of […]

The post Will These Biodegradable Bags Make It To The Mainstream? appeared first on Food Republic.

Review: BBQ with The Pit Barrel Cooker

by The Ravenous Couple @ The Ravenous Couple

Let’s put this out here front and center. We’re gluttons for good smoked bbq (we’ve had a bbq caterer smoke bbq for 3 parties!) but have always been too intimidated to make it at home—until now. Yes, we’ve spent hours making complex soups such as bun bo hue and other seemingly difficult Vietnamese dishes, but […]

Heo Quay Sous Vide Crispy Pork Belly

by The Ravenous Couple @ The Ravenous Couple

Instead of holiday leftover recipes we’re going to post a recipe that’s been sitting in our queue for quite a long time, heo quay Vietnamese roasted pork belly.  Pork belly is beloved ingredient on our blog, from braised and caramelized pork belly (thit kho to thit rang) to our Asian inspired porchetta. While all of […]

How to Appreciate Durian Taste in Southeast Asia

by Claire @ Authentic Food Quest

The post How to Appreciate Durian Taste in Southeast Asia appeared first on Authentic Food Quest.

How to Best Prepare for Your First Silent Retreat

by Rosemary @ Authentic Food Quest

The post How to Best Prepare for Your First Silent Retreat appeared first on Authentic Food Quest.

Ben Thanh Market: Street Food Paradise

Ben Thanh Market: Street Food Paradise

by backpackerlee @ backpackerlee

Ben Thanh Street Food Market is a must-visit destination for visitors of all ages to Saigon, as they can enjoy a wonderful dining experience with diverse and tasty dishes from all three main regions of Vietnam, as well as discover the bustle and hustle of nearby city nightlife right in the heart of the city. […]

Vietnamese Rice Paper Snacks – Are You Sure You Know The Differences?

Vietnamese Rice Paper Snacks – Are You Sure You Know The Differences?


The Christina's Blog

Can't tell the difference between all the types of Vietnamese rice paper snacks? Then this article is for you! Bonus: Addresses to the best stalls included!

Nomsly Meal Delivery For Kids Opens Up A World Of Flavor

by Jess Kapadia @ Food Republic

Boston-based Nomsly is redefining meal delivery for kids. While many grocery and meal kit delivery services include options for kids’ meals, Nomsly is the first focused entirely on childhood nutrition from start to finish. Business has been great for the community, too: Ingredients are sourced in part from the urban farm at reVision House family shelter, […]

The post Nomsly Meal Delivery For Kids Opens Up A World Of Flavor appeared first on Food Republic.

Nanny’s Christmas Cherry Balls – So Retro So Delicious

by Ayngelina @ Bacon is Magic – The Best Food Around the World

One of my grandmother's best recipes, cherry balls are surprisingly easy to make but are always a crowd pleaser.

Nanny’s Christmas Cherry Balls – So Retro So Delicious is a post from: Bacon is Magic

7 Reasons to Eat Street Food in Vietnam

7 Reasons to Eat Street Food in Vietnam


Vespa Adventures

Planning your travel to Vietnam? Here's some reasons to eat street food in this wonderful country.

Budapest Cafes – A Budapest Coffee Guide for the 21st Century

by Daryl & Mindi Hirsch @ 2foodtrippers

The new breed of Budapest cafes are hip, happening and highly caffeinated. Read on to find out our favorite spots to drink third wave coffee in Hungary’s capital city. Budapest is a city known for a cafe culture that’s as rich as the cream that flows into its coffee. Back in the day, artists and poets would meet at Budapest coffee houses to share ideas and philosophies while sipping strong brews and eating a variety of Budapest cake specialties like strudel and flodni. Hundreds of cafes graced both sides of ...

The post Budapest Cafes – A Budapest Coffee Guide for the 21st Century appeared first on 2foodtrippers.

What to Eat at Newton Food Centre

by Lydia Lee @ TripZilla Magazine

Dalat Cherry Blossom Season: Feel The Pink!

by Minh Nguyen @ Vietnam Track

Have you ever dreamed about a romantic scenery of Japan, where you can walk back home on a street under

The post Dalat Cherry Blossom Season: Feel The Pink! appeared first on Vietnam Track.

Spending Christmas in Saigon, Vietnam

by fred wilson @ Back of the Bike Tours

Christmas is nearly a month away, and can be trully a magical time in Vietnam (minus the snow). If you decided to spend our favorite holiday in the South of Vietnam, make sure to check out our video on what Xmas is really like like...

The best breakfasts in Ho Chi Minh City

by fred wilson @ Back of the Bike Tours

If you’re like us and got the Vietnamese habit of waking up with the sun and a cup of cà phê sữa đá, you probably have already your favorite Phở or Bánh Mì joint that will help you start the day in ease. For most...

Fall in Love with the Best Authentic Khao Soi in Chiang Mai

by Rosemary @ Authentic Food Quest

The post Fall in Love with the Best Authentic Khao Soi in Chiang Mai appeared first on Authentic Food Quest.

Interesting Stories Behind The 130-Year-Old Cha Ca La Vong Restaurant

by Vietnam Track @ Vietnam Track

One of the very special dish of  Vietnam is ‘chả’, something only unique to Vietnam that no one can find

The post Interesting Stories Behind The 130-Year-Old Cha Ca La Vong Restaurant appeared first on Vietnam Track.

Top 5 Seafood dishes to try in Vietnam

by fred wilson @ Back of the Bike Tours

We always recommend travelers in Vietnam to definitely try what the locals call “ốc”, which literally means “snails”, though its meaning is actually going out and enjoying seafood, including crabs, shrimps, oyster and yes, snails. However these ốc restaurants usually have only a 5 to 10...

Two Days in Hanoi – How to Make the Most of It

by Juliana Hahn @ The Christina's Blog

Small alleys crammed with food stalls, delicious smells filling the air of the quaint Old Town streets and imposing monuments honoring Vietnam’s rich and turbulent history— all that and more is Hanoi. If you are planning a short trip here and want to see all the main attractions, this two-day itinerary of the capital is […]

The post Two Days in Hanoi – How to Make the Most of It appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

How to Spend Valentine’s Day in Chiang Mai, Thailand

by Claire @ Authentic Food Quest

The post How to Spend Valentine’s Day in Chiang Mai, Thailand appeared first on Authentic Food Quest.

Vietnamese Egg Rolls Recipe (Chả Giò)

by Huy @ Vietnamese Appetizers & Snacks – HungryHuy.com

My mom is an great cook and a very generous person. Her keen sense of taste and relentless persistence allows her to fine-tune recipes until they’re excellent, and worthy of sharing with others. It was my mom and grandma’s cooking that made their home the gathering point for lunch and dinner multiple times a week. Additionally, she readily […]

The post Vietnamese Egg Rolls Recipe (Chả Giò) appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

1 City, 9 Ways — Things to do in Hanoi, Vietnam for Every Kind of Traveler

by Katie McGrain @ Around the World in KT Days

From the minute you arrive in Hanoi, your senses will explode. The honking horns will fill your ears, while the whizzing motorbikes keep you constantly on your toes. Your mouth and nose will lead you to some of the most delicious corners of the city. It may take a day or so to orient yourself, [...]

The post 1 City, 9 Ways — Things to do in Hanoi, Vietnam for Every Kind of Traveler appeared first on Around the World in KT Days.

Vietnam Tourist Destinations (Sites Pictures)

by vietnamesecuisine @ All About Vietnamese Cuisine

Vietnam is a beautiful country with an extraordinary 4000-year history. Every year, there are millions of tourist visit to Vietnam from all around the world. Friends come to Vietnam for its wonderful sites, its cultures, and definitely for its various cuisine

The post Vietnam Tourist Destinations (Sites Pictures) appeared first on All About Vietnamese Cuisine.

10 Iconic Dishes To Hunt For In Hue, Vietnam - Food Republic

10 Iconic Dishes To Hunt For In Hue, Vietnam - Food Republic


Food Republic

With such a rich history, Hue claims home to several distinctive dishes — from delicate creations created to please the appetites of Nguyen feudal lords, emperors (and their hundreds of wives) — to sausages with complex, explosive and satisfying flavors. Here are the dishes our contributor saw, and ate again and again, on a recent visit to Hue.

The Democrats Are Losers

The Democrats Are Losers

by Osita Nwanevu @ Slate Articles

About one year ago, an estimated 4.2 million people participated in the Women’s March, which is thought to have been the largest demonstration in American history—several times larger than the massive protests of the Vietnam War Moratorium of 1969. By the end of 2017, thousands of anti-Trump protests across the country brought a total of between 5.2 million and 8 million people to the streets. This past weekend’s marches again brought out hundreds of thousands of participants. These protests are only the most visible manifestations of broad and seething discontent with our president and those advancing his agenda in Washington, discontent that has also encouraged tens of thousands of people to consider running for office and prompted hundreds of thousands of phone calls to Congress last year from those hoping to defeat the repeal of Obamacare, one of the key items on the president’s legislative agenda.

Through all of this, the Democratic Party has exhibited little of the confidence and daring one would expect from a party on the right side of what may well be an unprecedented movement in the history of American politics. Monday was no different. “After several discussions, offers, counteroffers, the Republican leader and I have come to an arrangement,” Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, the ranking Democrat in Washington, announced this morning. “We will vote today to reopen the government to continue negotiating a global agreement with the commitment that if an agreement isn’t reached by February the 8th, the Senate will immediately proceed to consideration of legislation dealing with DACA.”

So ended, in Schumer’s words, the “Trump shutdown.” This moniker is a not insignificant bit of obfuscation on the Democrats’ part. It is of course true, as Schumer and others have said over and over again, that the Republican Party has the presidency, the House, and the Senate, making the shutdown the first to occur with ostensible one-party control of government. It is also true that moving forward on a funding bill required 60 votes in the Senate that the Republican Party did not have, even with the support of vulnerable shutdown-wary Democrats. The vast majority of Senate Democrats, who did not lend them that support, are responsible for the shutdown. Those Democrats have spent the past three days blaming it on Republican procedural incompetence rather than making a straightforward, honest case to the American people that the shutdown’s true purpose—securing a DACA deal—was worth it. “It’s the president’s and congressional Republicans’ responsibility to govern,” Schumer said in a speech Saturday. “It’s their responsibility to keep the doors open and the lights on around here.” The word for this is cowardice.

Luckily for Democrats, polls repeatedly showed that the American people backed their framing. A Public Policy Polling/Center for American Progress poll released Sunday found that 52 percent of Americans blamed President Trump and Republicans for the shutdown. It also found that 58 percent of Americans wanted to include Dreamers as part of a package deal to reopen the government. Forty-two percent of Americans, the poll says, would have strongly supported this.

The deal Democrats agreed to instead amounted to not much more than they were offered by the Republicans immediately before the shutdown: an extension of government funds until Feb. 8, a six-year extension of the needlessly beleaguered CHIP program, and a pinky promise from Mitch McConnell that a vote on a DACA fix will be held before the latest round of government funding expires. That assurance from McConnell was evidently solid enough to win over Democrats who, exactly a year ago, were moaning endlessly about his theft of Merrick Garland’s Supreme Court seat. Even assuming clean, pure, and virginal intent on McConnell’s part, it is not at all certain that the House will even take up a DACA fix not attached to a must-pass spending bill. This was, really, the point of the shutdown, which, after just three days of dithering from Democrats and nauseating lectures from Republicans about the harms of “manufactured” crises, is already over.

There may well be another shutdown in the coming weeks. But an opportunity was blown Monday. In 2013, the last shutdown, triggered by Republicans demanding the delayed implementation of Obamacare and spending cuts, lasted over two weeks. Since 1990, shutdowns have lasted, on average, 11 days. What might a competent party have done with that time? The shutdown was perhaps the first action by congressional Democrats that can properly be called “resistance.” In an act more significant than simply voting against nominees or bills in routine procedure, they briefly called government under this deeply, widely, and justifiably reviled administration to a halt. They could have, over the course of two weeks or so, taken a moral stand for a moral immigration policy—pushing until the bitter end for a clean DACA solution and proclaiming, with high rhetoric and theater, that all of our nation’s immigrants are worth fighting for. Substantively, this intransigence might have extracted concessions. Or it might not have. Either way, the Democrats would have both lifted the morale of the DACA enrollees who’ve been kicked around by this process and galvanized an activist base eager to see its representatives match their outrage and energy.

Then again, it’s plausible that a drawn-out showdown would have been purely depressing—treating us to more indignities like Illinois Rep. Luis Gutierrez, perhaps the most outspoken immigration advocate in Congress, conceding funding for the wall in desperation. This is where we’re at. A project that will be either dubious or outright laughable in implementation—publicly called a symbol of pig-headed xenophobia and bigotry by nearly all prominent Democrats at the beginning of this administration—will very probably be funded at the end of all this with their support, if a deal is ultimately passed. The largest changes to the legal immigration system in decades, proposals that would have been called far-right a year ago, have also been put on the table by the Democratic Minority Whip, Dick Durbin, who on Monday called DACA “the civil rights issue of our time.” If that is so, then it is fitting that this civil rights issue, like others past, will likely be resolved with a slimy compromise to be challenged by activists who are none too pleased. “Dems failed to fight & use their leverage to protect immigrant youth,” United We Dream co-founder Cristina Jimenez tweeted. “A false promise to vote on immigration from Rs is not a strategy to win. We won’t be fooled.”

This is the voice of the Democratic Party to come. Leaders like Schumer and Durbin might not realize it, but the people most likely to be the party’s standard-bearers in 2020 clearly do. Every top-tier contender in the Senate—Cory Booker, Kirsten Gillibrand, Kamala Harris, Bernie Sanders, and Elizabeth Warren—voted against Monday’s resolution. There’s some hope for the near-future in that. But for now, in the present and a year into the Trump administration, the only thing more astonishing than the man in the White House and the demands he’s made on our national conscience is the fecklessness of the party opposing him.

Conquering Mount Fansipan the Right Way (Tallest Mountain in Vietnam)

by Anna Suszynski @ The Christina's Blog

Mount Fansipan is the highest mountain in Vietnam and Indochina peninsula, located in the Hoang Lien Son mountain range. It was once only visited by adventure seekers fit enough to make the strenuous hike, but now this mountain offers a few different experiences for all types of travelers. Regardless of the new tram that brings […]

The post Conquering Mount Fansipan the Right Way (Tallest Mountain in Vietnam) appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

Tebodin in the media: VMT food trends 2018

by @ Newsfeed Tebodin B.V.

VMT Trends magazine interviewed Tebodin's Bert Frowijn, director Food, about the food trends for 2018. Bert shares the tree most important trends in the food industry: improved data management (with BIM), virtual reality (VR) and early partnerships.

Vietnamese

Vietnamese


BBC Good Food

Fresh salads, rice dishes and noodle soups are the order of the day when it comes to the vibrant cuisine of Southeast Asia.

Bún Thang – Vietnamese Noodle Soup with Chicken, Pork, & Egg

by Huy @ HungryHuy.com

What Is Bún Thang? My knowledge of the Vietnamese language is about on par with my grandma’s English, so this gives us lots of opportunities to learn from each other. She watches Viet news and Korean dramas which have a surprising amount of English in them. The latest term I explained to her was “poker face” hah! […]

The post Bún Thang – Vietnamese Noodle Soup with Chicken, Pork, & Egg appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

My Food Trip in Vietnam: 12 Must-Try Local Dishes

My Food Trip in Vietnam: 12 Must-Try Local Dishes


TripZilla

When in Vietnam, be sure try all these local dishes, recommended by a certified foodie!

Discover Vietnamese Cuisine

Discover Vietnamese Cuisine


WebMD

Learn how to cook healthy Vietnamese food.

Words of Wisdom on Surviving Travelers Diarrhea (From Someone Who Knows All Too Well)

by Katie McGrain @ Around the World in KT Days

I’m pretty sure it was the freshly cut pineapple on the streets of Antigua, Guatemala that was my gateway food to the world of travelers diarrhea. Since that fateful day, I’ve been in gastrointestinal distress three more times - in Panama, Nicaragua, and the Philippines. Luckily, none of these experiences were severe enough to require [...]

The post Words of Wisdom on Surviving Travelers Diarrhea (From Someone Who Knows All Too Well) appeared first on Around the World in KT Days.

Bún Bò Huế Recipe – Spicy Beef & Pork Noodle Soup

by Huy @ HungryHuy.com

Bún bò Huế is a hidden Vietnamese gem that has yet to “make it” in mainstream American cuisine. It’s a rich and spicy soup with deep layers of flavor. This Central Vietnamese soup is paired with tender slices of beef and pork, then topped with lots of fresh herbs. Phở has made its way in and has grown popular quickly, so why […]

The post Bún Bò Huế Recipe – Spicy Beef & Pork Noodle Soup appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

Vietnamese Banana, Coconut & Tapioca Dessert (Chè Chuối)

by Huy @ HungryHuy.com

Chè chuối is a warm, Vietnamese pudding-like dessert featuring bananas and rich coconut cream. You can easily make this at home in less than an hour! Chè in Vietnamese, refers to sweet desserts which are liquid such as drinks, pudding, or even types of ‘soup.’ So chè chuối you could say is a type of pudding, made of coconut […]

The post Vietnamese Banana, Coconut & Tapioca Dessert (Chè Chuối) appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

[Event] – Climb Black Virgin Mountain In Tay Ninh (13-14 Jan)

by Minh Nguyen @ Vietnam Track

Hello everyone, welcome to our third travel! This time, we’re going to climb the highest mountain in Southern Vietnam –

The post [Event] – Climb Black Virgin Mountain In Tay Ninh (13-14 Jan) appeared first on Vietnam Track.

Israel-Palestine Food Tours Promote Culinary Diplomacy

by Jess Kapadia @ Food Republic

Diplomacy comes in many forms — preventative, soft power, Machiavellian coercion — so many kinds you might not even be able to narrow down your favorite means to an end. Former NBA star Dennis Rodman would have you believe that regular basketball games between the U.S. and North Korea would completely mend relations, for example. […]

The post Israel-Palestine Food Tours Promote Culinary Diplomacy appeared first on Food Republic.

The Art of Marinating Lotus Tea at the West Lake

by Linh Dang @ Vietnam Track

  If the land of East Asia is famous for tea ceremony around the world, there is also a tea

The post The Art of Marinating Lotus Tea at the West Lake appeared first on Vietnam Track.

Takeaway Tales: Is the Burger’s Priest’s bacon double cheeseburger as good at home as in the restaurant?

Takeaway Tales: Is the Burger’s Priest’s bacon double cheeseburger as good at home as in the restaurant?

by Corey Mintz @ Toronto Life

We're taste-testing popular delivery dishes and evaluating the apps that bring the food to your door

Vietnam Snack Food in a Shell

Vietnam Snack Food in a Shell


Khiri Travel

A visit to one of the numerous snack restaurants serving the Vietnamese version of tapas opens a window to a remarkable experience combining both food and drink. While wandering along Ho Chi Minh City’s narrow streets, if you look closely at the trendy and crowded street food “restaurants” you will notice the low key bamboo [...]

Recipe: Pickled Mustard Greens – Dưa Cải Chua

by Helen Le @ Danang Cuisine

Recipe: Pickled Mustard Greens - Dưa Cải ChuaBy Helen Le Published: November 26, 2017Prep: 20 minsCook: 10 minsReady In: 72 hrs 30 minsYield: 8-10 ServingsThis simple pickle will help you digest all the heavy food you’ll consume during these upcoming festive days. Picked mustard greens (dua cai chua) with its lovely crunchiness and tartness is […]

Top 10 Vietnamese Food | Introduction to Eating in Vietnam

Top 10 Vietnamese Food | Introduction to Eating in Vietnam


Live Less Ordinary: Bangkok Based Bloggers Travelling in Asia & Beyond

Introduction to eating in Vietnam. Includes popular local Vietnamese dishes and my own personal favourites. My top 10 Vietnamese Food. Hanoi, Saigon, Hoi An

Vietnam Track Looking For Local Supporters

by Minh Nguyen @ Vietnam Track

[English below] Là một người con sinh sống trên mảnh đất Việt Nam đã nhiều năm, bạn đã đi và

The post Vietnam Track Looking For Local Supporters appeared first on Vietnam Track.

Recipe: Fish sauce glazed pork belly- Thịt rang cháy cạnh

by Helen Le @ Danang Cuisine

Recipe: Fish sauce glazed pork belly- Thịt rang cháy cạnhBy Helen Le Published: December 5, 2017Prep: 20 minsCook: 50 minsReady In: 1 hr 10 minsYield: 3-4 ServingsFish sauce glazed pork belly becomes a tasty addition to family meals. Although the fish sauce amount is much less now, this is still one of the dishes that […]

Dua Mon Recipe Vietnamese Brined Vegetables

by The Ravenous Couple @ The Ravenous Couple

Dưa món is a mix of brined vegetables,  a Vietnamese version of an Italian giardiniera that is ubiquitously found on tables of feasting Vietnamese families during lunar new year celebrations.  It’s commonly eaten with traditional banh chung and banh tet, but can really be used as a vegetable side for a meat entree. Each family may […]

Lunch Lesson: five essential dishes that tell the story of Toronto’s Chinatown

Lunch Lesson: five essential dishes that tell the story of Toronto’s Chinatown

by Corey Mintz @ Toronto Life

From shrimp with lobster sauce to Peking duck

The 10 Most Delightful Popular Vietnamese Desserts to Indulge In

The 10 Most Delightful Popular Vietnamese Desserts to Indulge In


Authentic Food Quest

Vietnam has an endless list of desserts. Here are the favorites Chè, Banh and other delicious popular Vietnamese desserts and where to have them in Vietnam.

Snack Attack: Vietnam’s Best Street Food

Snack Attack: Vietnam’s Best Street Food


backpackerlee

Since my Vietnamese escapades in Hanoi, Saigon, Da Nang, Hue, and Hoi An, I have learned to appreciate what this mysterious and often-French-inspired cuisine has to offer – and there’s …

The Ultimate Dim Sum Guide

by Amanda Carlea @ Buffalo Tours Travel Blog

Source Travelling to Hong Kong or Shanghai in the near future? Despite their many differences they have common threads, particularly the ever popular brunch mayhem that’s best known as dim sum. A longstanding tradition of many branches of Chinese cuisine, this meal consists of a variety of small plates served with a hot pot of […]

Recipe: BUTTER BEEF – Bò Lăn Bơ

by Helen Le @ Danang Cuisine

Recipe: BUTTER BEEF - Bò Lăn BơBy Helen Le Published: December 11, 2017Prep: 20 minsCook: 10 minsReady In: 30 minsYield: 1 (1-2 Servings)Butter beef seems to be widely known among the overseas Vietnamese but is not a popular dish in Vietnam. However, it's a worth-trying appetizer with easy-to-find ingredients. Let give it a try!Bò lăn […]

Recipe: Toasted garlic chili peanuts- Đậu phộng cháy tỏi ớt

by Helen Le @ Danang Cuisine

Toasted garlic chili peanuts- Đậu phộng cháy tỏi ớtBy Helen Le Published: December 16, 2017Prep: 10 minsCook: 10 minsReady In: 20 minsYield: 6-8 ServingsToasted garlic chili peanuts is a new and trendy snack in VN, very addicting. It’s a great drinking food, or to serve with rice or porridgeĐậu phộng cháy tỏi là món snack […]

Stock Photo - Vietnam, Hanoi, Vietnamese snack food being roasted in iron skillet with chopsticks

Stock Photo - Vietnam, Hanoi, Vietnamese snack food being roasted in iron skillet with chopsticks


Alamy

Download this stock image: Vietnam, Hanoi, Vietnamese snack food being roasted in iron skillet with chopsticks - E8FG5G from Alamy's library of millions of high resolution stock photos, illustrations and vectors.

Pork Belly Recipe for Bánh Mì (Vietnamese Sandwiches)

by Huy @ HungryHuy.com

At Vietnamese sandwich shops, you’ll find a dizzying number of meat options like grilled chicken, grilled beef, sardines, and even some Chinese influenced options like xíu mại. However, with Vietnamese sandwiches, pork seems to be king–you’ll always see pork options like chả lụa (meat loaf), thịt nướng (grilled pork), nem nướng (ground & grilled pork), bì […]

The post Pork Belly Recipe for Bánh Mì (Vietnamese Sandwiches) appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

Here, Eat This: A Beginner's Guide to Vietnamese Cuisine

Here, Eat This: A Beginner's Guide to Vietnamese Cuisine


Houston Press

It was only a matter of time before we hit Vietnamese food. The cuisine has become one of Houston's favorite over the last few decades -- coinciding with the large influx of Vietnamese immigrants that began following the Vietnam War -- with dishes such as pho now rivaling cheese enchiladas...

Vietnam Tourist Destinations (Street Cuisine)

by vietnamesecuisine @ All About Vietnamese Cuisine

As other Asia countries, street food plays an essential role to form Vietnamese Cuisine. Vietnamese street food is very various in styles of cooking based on particular times of the day, different regions, and of course Vietnamese street food varies from

The post Vietnam Tourist Destinations (Street Cuisine) appeared first on All About Vietnamese Cuisine.

Top 5 Children Activities in Saigon, Vietnam!

by fred wilson @ Back of the Bike Tours

We’re quite proud to say that we had our tours customers aged from 1 to 95 years old, and they all enjoyed it! Though parents are often quite scared to let their children on a motorbike in busy Saigon, we believe that is also a...

The Ultimate Guide to Luxury Travel in Vietnam

by Malte Blas @ Buffalo Tours Travel Blog

If you are looking for the perfect combination of culture, relaxation and adventure, then Vietnam offers one of the most unique luxury travel experiences in Southeast Asia. From the elegant heritage hotels of Hanoi and Saigon, to the exotic mystique of Halong Bay and Vietnam’s exclusive island resorts, luxury travel in Vietnam provides the perfect […]

Vietnamese Papaya & Beef Jerky Salad – Gỏi Đu Đủ Khô Bò

by Huy @ Vietnamese Appetizers & Snacks – HungryHuy.com

This is an easy 3-ingredient papaya salad you can throw together in a few minutes. There’s t the cooking required, just easy prep so you can get to snacking. Green papaya and beef jerky salad is a light appetizer, a great choice for a snack or appetizer. My mom says she used to buy this from food carts in Vietnam. […]

The post Vietnamese Papaya & Beef Jerky Salad – Gỏi Đu Đủ Khô Bò appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

BEST MOBILE APPS TO SAVE MONEY ON FOOD FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS (Part 1)

by vietnamesecuisine @ All About Vietnamese Cuisine

This quick blog post will not exactly be about Vietnamese Cuisine, but it is still about food. In this post, I will share with you some of the best mobile apps to save money on food for college students. FYI,

The post BEST MOBILE APPS TO SAVE MONEY ON FOOD FOR COLLEGE STUDENTS (Part 1) appeared first on All About Vietnamese Cuisine.

Vietnamese Chicken Soup (With Elbow Macaroni)

by Huy @ HungryHuy.com

It has been getting coooold lately, cold for Southern California anyways! This is perfect weather for you to cook up some soup. If you haven’t built up the courage to try the bitter melon soup I posted the other week,  Vietnamese chicken soup with elbow macaroni might be a simpler start :). What’s that you […]

The post Vietnamese Chicken Soup (With Elbow Macaroni) appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

Top 5 Most Popular Vietnamese Dishes

by vietnamesecuisine @ All About Vietnamese Cuisine

In this post, I will share the top 5 most popular Vietnamese dishes which you can easily find if you visit my country. I will also include a recipe for each dish, so you can try to make it at

The post Top 5 Most Popular Vietnamese Dishes appeared first on All About Vietnamese Cuisine.

Bánh Xèo – Savory Vietnamese Crêpes

by Huy @ HungryHuy.com

Bánh xèo seems to be designed to be eaten as a family. The batter, filling ingredients, and veggies aren’t complicated to prepare, but they don’t make sense to be bought or made to be eaten by yourself. You don’t just buy 1/4 pound of pork, 8 shrimps, or buy 1/4 head of lettuce. You kind […]

The post Bánh Xèo – Savory Vietnamese Crêpes appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

Kitchen Diaries: The five most-snooped-in chef’s fridges of 2017

Kitchen Diaries: The five most-snooped-in chef’s fridges of 2017

by Toronto Life @ Toronto Life

Over the past year, we raided the kitchens of Toronto chefs and notable foodies. These were the most-popular ones

Visit Seoul – A Travel Guide

by Katie McGrain @ Around the World in KT Days

Seoul is an electric city. Whether you are here for a layover, a couple of days, or multi-week excursion, making the most of your time is essential. No matter what kind of traveler you are, there is something to do and a place to visit in Seoul for you. From street food and [...]

The post Visit Seoul – A Travel Guide appeared first on Around the World in KT Days.

23 Vietnamese Dishes to Celebrate Tet - Bacon is Magic

23 Vietnamese Dishes to Celebrate Tet - Bacon is Magic


Bacon is Magic - The Best Food Around the World

Celebrate Vietnamese Tet with Food! Here are 23 Vietnamese foods you should try during Tet, the most important holiday in Vietnam.

Racist Sandwich Podcast’s Kickstarter Is The Best One To Support Right Now

by Tiffany @ Food Republic

One of food media and culture’s biggest criticisms to date is the lack of diverse discussion of race, gender and class. That’s why Racist Sandwich is the podcast we all need! But it needs outside support to keep going. The independent podcast, hosted by chef and writer Soleil Ho and journalist Zahir Janmohamed, recently capped […]

The post Racist Sandwich Podcast’s Kickstarter Is The Best One To Support Right Now appeared first on Food Republic.

Chinese New Year Food: 23 Things You Must Try

by Ayngelina @ Bacon is Magic – The Best Food Around the World

Chinese New Year Food: Discover 23 foods that you can't miss during Chinese New Year.

Chinese New Year Food: 23 Things You Must Try is a post from: Bacon is Magic

How To Make Foolproof Parisian Gnocchi

by Tiffany @ Food Republic

Brown your butter and pick your herb (we suggest sage or parsley), because it’s time to make pillowy gnocchi! Our friends at ChefSteps wrote in this week with this French twist on gnocchi. Instead of employing the traditional potato, this recipe calls for a pâte à choux — the same dough used to make éclairs […]

The post How To Make Foolproof Parisian Gnocchi appeared first on Food Republic.

Sesame balls – A Food Toy

by Son Nguyen @ vietnamese snack – Vietnam Track

Sesame balls, ‘bánh lúc lắc’ in the North of Vietnam or ‘bánh cam’ in the South, are a type of

The post Sesame balls – A Food Toy appeared first on Vietnam Track.

Recipe: Combo dessert soup- Chè thưng

by Helen Le @ Danang Cuisine

Recipe: Combo dessert soup- Chè thưngBy Helen Le Published: January 10, 2018Prep: 40 minsCook: 60 minsReady In: 1 hr 40 minsChe Thung is a popular Vietnamese sweet soup with coconut milk soup base and various kinds of beans, lotus seeds, and peanuts etc. There is also another dessert called Che Ba Ba, which is very […]

Steamed Mussels in Lemongrass broth

by The Ravenous Couple @ The Ravenous Couple

It’s no secret among Angeleno’s that some of the best Thai food in town comes from the kitchen of Jitlada, located in a non-descript strip mall in East Hollywood.  We were so smitten the first time we tried it, we even wrote about it, one of the very few restaurant posts on the blog.  One […]

Vietnamese Beef Jerky Vua Kho Bo recipe

by The Ravenous Couple @ The Ravenous Couple

There’s really only one name in the Vietnamese beef jerky game in America and everyone knows it: Vua Kho Bo. Literally and figuratively, it’s the king of Vietnamese style beef jerky. While there are a few imitators, ask Vietnamese-American loving beef jerky enthusiast and that’s the top of the list. Maybe their popularity is because […]

Discovering Sapa: A Comprehensive Guide to Visiting Vietnam’s Northern Hill Station

by Juliana Hahn @ The Christina's Blog

Sapa is famous for its beautiful landscapes full of verdant rice paddies, rolling hills, Vietnam’s highest mountain, and hidden trails in overgrown valleys. While the idea of coming here for a trek far off from the noise and pollution of the big cities inspires wanderlust, organizing it all can be a bit daunting, especially for […]

The post Discovering Sapa: A Comprehensive Guide to Visiting Vietnam’s Northern Hill Station appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

10 street food dishes you have to try in Ho Chi Minh City

10 street food dishes you have to try in Ho Chi Minh City


The Independent

With vendors selling specialty dishes daily on every street corner, you don’t stay hungry for long in Vietnam’s Ho Chi Minh City.

17 of the Best Things to Do in Seoul (from Bloggers Who Lived Here)

by Katie McGrain @ Around the World in KT Days

Seoul consistently tops lists as one of the best cities to visit in Asia. Nearly half of the population of Korea lives in Seoul (that's 10 million people), and it's the hub of Korea's economy, politics, and culture. Whatever interests you - be it food, history, art - you will find it in [...]

The post 17 of the Best Things to Do in Seoul (from Bloggers Who Lived Here) appeared first on Around the World in KT Days.

Lunch On The Run With The Best Asian Meals In Jars

by Sindhu Bharadwaj @ Asian Inspirations

Say goodbye to tired old sandwiches and expensive take-away meals with five easy recipes for lunch on the run. Send your kids off to school with flavour-packed salads and sushi bowls, and dine ‘al-desko’ in the office on nutritious Asian soups. With a bit of preparation over the weekend, you and your …

The post Lunch On The Run With The Best Asian Meals In Jars appeared first on Asian Inspirations.

Food for Hanukkah: 17 Things You’ll Want to Eat

by Ayngelina @ Bacon is Magic – The Best Food Around the World

The festival of lights, there is so much delicious food for Hanukkah you need to try.

Food for Hanukkah: 17 Things You’ll Want to Eat is a post from: Bacon is Magic

Vietnamese Sweet Soups – Che

by vietnamesecuisine @ All About Vietnamese Cuisine

What is Che? Che is originated from the North of Vietnam. It refers to any Vietnamese sweet soups and desert pudding. Che is normally made from different types of fruit and beans. Since Vietnam is a tropical country which is known for its various

The post Vietnamese Sweet Soups – Che appeared first on All About Vietnamese Cuisine.

5 Must-try Dishes to Eat Like a Local in Fiji

by TripZilla @ TripZilla Magazine

Vietnamese Papaya & Beef Jerky Salad – Gỏi Đu Đủ Khô Bò

by Huy @ HungryHuy.com

This is an easy 3-ingredient papaya salad you can throw together in a few minutes. There’s t the cooking required, just easy prep so you can get to snacking. Green papaya and beef jerky salad is a light appetizer, a great choice for a snack or appetizer. My mom says she used to buy this from food carts in Vietnam. […]

The post Vietnamese Papaya & Beef Jerky Salad – Gỏi Đu Đủ Khô Bò appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

How to say 'snack food' in Vietnamese

How to say 'snack food' in Vietnamese


WordHippo

The Vietnamese for snack food is thực phẩm ăn nhẹ. Find more Vietnamese words at wordhippo.com!

Must-Try Food in Vietnam for Kids: Vietnamese Food for Picky Eaters - Family Travel Blog: An Epic Education

Must-Try Food in Vietnam for Kids: Vietnamese Food for Picky Eaters - Family Travel Blog: An Epic Education


An Epic Education

There is so much delicious food in Vietnam for kids. Here I list up some of the best Vietnamese food for picky eaters: fruits, desserts & main dishes.

Hello world!

by comnamadmin @ COMNAM Vietnamese Street Eats

Welcome to WordPress. This is your first post. Edit or delete it, then start writing!

The post Hello world! appeared first on COMNAM Vietnamese Street Eats.

Vietnamese Green Mango Salad with Shrimp (Gỏi Xoài)

by Huy @ HungryHuy.com

Vietnamese mango salad (gỏi xoài) is a vibrant dish featuring green mangoes, shrimp, and is highlighted with fresh herbs like mint, thai basil and cilantro. It’s a mouth-watering combination of sweet, sour, salty with lots of contrasts in texture. Disclaimer: this is supposed to be a very simple salad. The one we’re making here has a bit of […]

The post Vietnamese Green Mango Salad with Shrimp (Gỏi Xoài) appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

Vietnam Tourist Destinations (Food Pictures)

by vietnamesecuisine @ All About Vietnamese Cuisine

Cuisine is all about culture, and with a country that has more than 50 different ethnic groups from the north to the south like Vietnam, its cuisine styles are expected to be various from region to region. In this post,

The post Vietnam Tourist Destinations (Food Pictures) appeared first on All About Vietnamese Cuisine.

We’ll Always Have Sky City

We’ll Always Have Sky City

by Bianca Bosker @ Slate Articles

Sky City, the replica of Paris on the outskirts of Hangzhou, was supposed to be empty. The development had been built in 2006 to house 10,000 people in a community modeled after France’s capital, complete with its own Eiffel Tower, Champs-Élysées, and white Haussmann-style apartments. Yet word was that hardly anyone had moved in: It was too far, too inconvenient, too weird. In 2013, a video surfaced showing Sky City’s long boulevards empty of life and its Eiffel Tower choked with weeds, and news sites generated more than 60 copycat stories declaring Sky City a failure. They described the clip as a rare glimpse at China’s “eerie,” “abandoned,” and “post-apocalyptic” City of Light. “Paris, now virtually a ghost town—streets empty, stores vacant,” repeated a 2016 Nightline story, panning over bleak gray plazas populated only by fountains copied from Parisian gardens. (Full disclosure: I was a talking head for the segment.)

For many, Sky City’s demise was an “I told you so” moment. I’ve spent the past decade tracing China’s “duplitecture”—the replica White Houses, Versailles Palaces, and even foreign cities, from Venice to Jackson Hole, Wyoming, that have multiplied through the country—and from the start of my research, planners and architecture critics have assured me the movement was on its last legs. “It’s really just a trend and it’s not sustainable,” an architect at Ben Wood Studio Shanghai told me in 2008; soon after, a different Shanghai-based planner asserted duplitecture was “already outdated even within China.”

Sky City became the poster child for other themed developments that had allegedly met the same fate: intended to house Chinese families in surroundings inspired by Orange County or Barcelona, these communities were said to have languished as ghost towns. An op-ed in the Global Times asserted, “These ‘fake cities’ are just so ridiculously similar to their Western originals that rather than anyone taking them seriously, they turned into residential amusement parks”—empty backdrops for wedding photos and tourist selfies.

Then again, overseas reporting on Chinese culture has a tendency to turn into a game of telephone. (That 2013 video of Sky City was in fact filmed in 2008 by artist Caspar Stracke.) When a documentary filmmaker who’d read my book Original Copies invited me to join him to revisit these duplitecture developments, some of which I hadn’t seen in years, I leapt at the chance to check in on them firsthand. Had they been abandoned? Remodeled? Razed to the ground? Liaoning’s Holland Village—which installed windmills, canals, and a double of the Hague on an area three times the size of Brooklyn’s Navy Yard—had been demolished 10 years after its construction. Sky City had just celebrated its 10th anniversary. This past May, I set out to see what I’d find.

* * *

Once in China, I did not have to go hunting for duplitecture. I caught my first glimpse while in line for customs: The flat-screen TV mounted overhead played footage of starched Chinese soldiers saluting a government building that appeared to be the lovechild of the U.S. Capitol and the White House. En route to Hangzhou, I spotted sprawling Italian palazzos the color of Easter eggs; a British hamlet; a red-domed structure that could have passed for the Duomo in Florence; another U.S. Capitol; and, in line for taxis at the Hangzhou train station, an airbrushed ad for the be-fountained villas of Cam-Town Riviera.

A taxi driver who had last traveled to Sky City two years ago—and never with a foreigner—took me out of the dense thicket of Hangzhou’s skyscrapers into the gangly, mismatched landscape of its suburbs, past a ball-bearing factory, a pink house frosted by white balustrades, and, at last, to a four-lane boulevard, at the end of which sat Sky City’s Eiffel Tower, rising 35 stories into the air.

Both sides of the road were flanked by row after row of high-rise apartments girded by scaffolding and waving cranes from their roofs. The walls bordering the buildings advertised homes in the shadow of the Eiffel Tower (“Don’t wait!”) and reminded passers-by to pursue the “Chinese dream.” For a deserted ghost town, construction was booming.

Expecting to find Sky City an empty shell, I’d stocked up on water and peanuts at the train station. Instead, the streets hummed with the mosquito-whine of scooters and bustled with pedestrians: Parents pushed strollers, young couples queued for Pocky, teenage boys lounged on shady benches, and elderly women shuffled under their neon umbrellas. I snuck into the back entrance of what I thought was an abandoned hotel, only to discover myself in the chandeliered consulting room of a plastic surgery clinic. It advertised a procedure of “exquisite carvings” that would give patients a “U.S.-nose.”

Long populated by Juliet balconies and Art Nouveau streetlights, Sky City had added other sights common to French towns. I passed grocers, barber shops, day cares, cafés, a cosmetics store, a “Baby Bilingual Education Center,” and a boutique with a mannequin dressed in chic black shorts and a Yves Saint Laurent purse. Just like France’s Paris, Hangzhou’s Paris was also filled with Chinese tourists snapping photos.

I learned it had been two years since a new management company had taken over the town. Where an earlier breed of “build-it-and-they’ll-come” developer had judged success in concrete poured, this more enlightened manager had recognized the importance of luring services and stores that would attract residents. The company’s chairman promised he would bring Sky City a Montessori school, “French research institutes,” and spas offering the “world’s most authentic and advanced beauty treatments”; a year later, he pegged the town’s population at nearly 40,000 people—though a bored twentysomething at Madenjoy Real Estate told me that between 14,000 and 18,000 residents had moved in. Still, it appeared something was working: According to Hangzhou Daily, when 663 new units went on sale in August, they sold out in less than four minutes for an average of 14,000 yuan per square meter—about $200 per square foot, slightly more than the average price in Houston. (The average price-per-square-foot for apartments in downtown Hangzhou, two hours away by public transportation, is about triple that, which might explain the high proportion of young families—Paris as starter home.) The developers behind the Hangzhou Paris did not consider it an “eerily depressing ghost town.” They described it as the foundation for a new satellite city.

In its early years, Sky City had, like other themed communities, pushed a European lifestyle to match its European surroundings. British-style Thames Town courted English pubs, German-themed Anting Town served bratwurst, and Sky City hosted crash courses on Gallic customs, from the time of day French diners take their meals (according to the organizers’ website: “Most French restaurants offer lunch between 12:00 and 14:00”) to how they savor caviar (“use the tip of the tongue to slowly crush each individual grain one by one”).

Since then, however, tastes had evolved. I stopped into a bakery just a few steps away from the Eiffel Tower, imagining I’d pick up a baguette or brioche to pair with my Parisian stroll. But not a single thing in its glass cases could reasonably have been described as “French”—not the rolls of taro-infused “Purple Cake,” not the triangles of Barbie-doll pink cream, not the fluffy mounds of dough uniting mayonnaise and hot dog in a stunning number of permutations. These were hybrid pastries with a Chinese sensibility. Like Sky City itself, this pâtisserie had taken a European classic, then reconceived it to suit Chinese tastes.

* * *

Other duplitecture developments had undergone similar transformations. The ghost towns had both filled out—I hit traffic getting into Shanghai’s Thames Town—and mellowed out, the Western surroundings giving way to local habits.

These communities had once emphasized their foreign themes by courting businesses with ties to Western culture, or adopting strict design covenants meant to preserve their foreign look and feel. Planting vegetable gardens, hanging laundry outside to dry, or enclosing balconies—all common sights in typical Chinese neighborhoods—were usually prohibited. Now, at Hangzhou’s Venice Water Town, nearly every Moorish window had a view of glass-encased porches or underwear fluttering in the breeze. One middle-aged woman had planted yuzu, pomelo, peaches, mint, chives, and squash in a yard no bigger than a bus stop.

In Thames Town, where British pubs and wine stores had once far outnumbered Chinese restaurants, couples and families now perused pu’er tea shops, slurped down noodles, and lined up for bubble tea, or Baskin-Robbins. The 27-year-old owner of a boutique selling clothes by up-and-coming Chinese designers told me Thames Town had grown busier since 2014, thanks in part to the expansion of the subway system, and in part to the swelling population of Shanghai proper. (Between 2000 and 2016, the city had grown by the population of New York City, pushing the city limits closer to Thames Town.) When I asked whether Thames Town had tried to court British restaurants to match its English architecture, he choked, midbite, on his sticky rice. Why would anyone want that? “But the English don’t have anything good to eat!” protested the owner’s friend. “All they have is fried fish and french fries! British food is disgusting.

Not every former ghost town has come to life. In Shanghai’s Holland Village (no relation to Liaoning’s), most storefronts along the main street stood empty or deserted, their dusty concrete floors littered with desiccated bouquets or curled posters. Like something out of fairy tale fever dream, I met an elderly woman who lived inside the town’s wooden windmill—the previous tenant, a wedding photography studio, had left it in her care after business went south. Several buildings, including replicas of Amsterdam’s Maritime Museum and De Bijenkorf department store, were under construction—just as they had been during a previous visit in 2008. Since then, the developers had successfully completed a stone cathedral, which they’d outfitted with crucifixes, a crèche, and a wooden altarpiece, then rented to local businesses for use as offices.

A 36-year-old entrepreneur, one of the few shop owners in Holland Village, had chosen the ground floor of a brick townhouse for the headquarters of her wine-importing firm. Since wine was European, she explained, it was appropriate to bring clients to drink in a European setting. And besides, she thought Holland Village was beautiful—a glimpse at a continent she’d never experienced firsthand. “I think there’s a lot of foreign architecture in China because people who can’t afford to see the world can see what it’s like overseas,” she said. “It’s a great thing that we now have all these different styles of buildings in China. It’s not just architecture. It’s also a cultural exchange in a way.”

* * *

Anthony Mackay, a British architect and urban planner who worked on Thames Town, is less enthusiastic about the “cultural exchange” duplitecture represents. I visited Thames Town with him one afternoon, and we followed the curving cobblestone streets past columned apartments drawn from London’s Belgravia, past black-and-white Tudor-style inns, and past a replica of Bristol, England’s Christ Church. (The original is a 20-minute drive from the offices of the firm, Atkins, that planned Thames Town, and it seems the designers conveniently opted to copy from their own backyard.)

“When I discovered that the architecture of Thames Town was a pure imitation of buildings around Bristol and England, I felt ashamed. I felt ashamed that we—I mean Atkins—had succumbed to the client and built such a place,” said Mackay, stressing that he did not design Thames Town’s buildings but consulted on the urban plan for Thames Town and the larger suburban district, Songjiang, to which it belongs.

To Mackay, while the original, British buildings were authentic to the time and place from which they emerged, this Chinese interpretation was copy-and-paste architecture—a rootless imitation. “These buildings have no history. They are pure theater. They are pure replica,” he said. “Tourists in Paris and Venice know that beyond the façade is a genuine history. They are trodding on the ground that Henry the Eighth trod on. Here, you’re trodding on the ground that was a duck farm.”

I considered this while treading the sidewalks of Thames Town. It’s true the landscape houses more than its fair share of absurdities: the statues honoring British greats, like Princess Diana, Winston Churchill, and Harry Potter; the limestone façade of an English school that commands students to “Conquer English to Make China Stronger”; the dozens of brides dressed like princesses and oversize Tinkerbells, feigning surprise as photographers instruct grooms to proffer fake-flower bouquets. Like “uncanny-valley” robots that unsettle us by falling just short of being human, these buildings represent “uncanny architecture,” arousing suspicion because they are nearly identical to the originals, yet a smidge too big, or too new.

But then we forget the originals were once off-putting and conspicuous themselves. We expect columns and crenellations to have the respectable patina of age. They didn’t always. Remarking on the flashy newness of J. Paul Getty’s Malibu villa, a copy of an ancient Roman country house, Joan Didion observed that the ornate surroundings sparkled a little too much with the shine of wealth and status—just as the original would have. “Ancient marbles once appeared just as they appear here: as strident, opulent evidence of imperial power and acquisition,” she writes.

Over time, the glitter and strangeness of duplitecture will fade, until its inhabitants all but forget the replica ever belonged anywhere except its adopted milieu. Back in the U.S., on my drive home from the airport, I pass New York’s own duplitecture—Joseph Pulitzer’s copy of a Venetian palazzo on East 73rd, Gertrude Rhinelander Waldo’s Loire Valley chateau on Madison Avenue. (Of course, there is a double standard, and while the creators of these buildings were “inspired by” European landmarks, China’s developers have been “knocking off” the greats.) Europe’s aristocrats might never have trod in these duplicated structures. But it doesn’t matter: They’ve acquired a new history and transformed into Manhattan’s treasures, rather than Europe’s.

China’s duplitecture will also grow old. Already, its Paris, its Holland, its Venice, and its England have become Chinese in spirit, if not in appearance.

10 Vietnamese foods you need to try | Travel Feature

10 Vietnamese foods you need to try | Travel Feature


Rough Guides

Vietnamese food is very distinct, and can be the highlight of a visit. These are 10 essential Vietnamese foods everyone should try.

9 Unique Ilocos Food to Delight on in the Philippines

by Claire @ Authentic Food Quest

The post 9 Unique Ilocos Food to Delight on in the Philippines appeared first on Authentic Food Quest.

30 Best Vietnam Street Foods & Local Dishes - CamEscapes

30 Best Vietnam Street Foods & Local Dishes - CamEscapes


Cam Escapes

Vietnam Street Food & Local Dishes are some of the most dynamic and delicious in the world. They also differ by region. Find new favorites here!

5 Must-try Dishes to Eat Like a Local in Fiji

by TripZilla @ TripZilla Magazine

7 Vietnamese Markets in Hanoi You Should Not Miss

by Katie McGrain @ Around the World in KT Days

An exploration of a local market gives you a tiny glimpse into life in Vietnam, and the markets of Hanoi are no exception. Discover the tourist centric Hanoi Night Market, where you will find your typical souvenirs and trinkets. And don’t miss the intimate neighborhood markets where you will experience the vibrant Vietnamese community. Most [...]

The post 7 Vietnamese Markets in Hanoi You Should Not Miss appeared first on Around the World in KT Days.

Vietnamese Food: 25 Must-Eat Dishes in Saigon (and Where To Try Them)

Vietnamese Food: 25 Must-Eat Dishes in Saigon (and Where To Try Them)


Migrationology - Food Travel Blog

Vietnamese food is an insanely delicious cuisine. Here are 25 Vietnamese dishes you need to try, and restaurants to eat them in Saigon.

CƠMNAM Vietnamese Street Eats

CƠMNAM Vietnamese Street Eats


COMNAM Vietnamese Street Eats

CƠMNAM Vietnamese Street Eats features a variety of iconic dishes from Vietnam, influenced by both French and Vietnamese gastronomy, which have been given a modern twist.

Vietnamese Spring Rolls Recipe (Bò Bía Recipe)

by Huy @ Vietnamese Appetizers & Snacks – HungryHuy.com

What Is Bò Bía? The name bò bía is likely a Vietnamese adaptation of the Chinese roll “popiah.” These two foods are quite different though. It’s plausible to think bò bía was adapted by the Vietnamese and ingredients were substituted with what was available. The first noticeable change is the Vietnamese use a rice paper wrapper instead of […]

The post Vietnamese Spring Rolls Recipe (Bò Bía Recipe) appeared first on HungryHuy.com.

Travel Tips to Moc Chau

by Vietnam Track @ Vietnam Track

Moc Chau, a big plateau in Son La province 180km from Hanoi, has a shared border with Laos of 40.6km.

The post Travel Tips to Moc Chau appeared first on Vietnam Track.

The Best Vegetarian Restaurants in Ho Chi Minh City

by fred wilson @ Back of the Bike Tours

If you are following us on our YouTube Channel (and you should!) you probably would have watched all of our top 5 already. Our goal as always is to provide travelers with the best spots, according to us, for various Vietnamese street food or activities here...

Phuc Deli-Viet has some new neighbours

by pd_admin @

Pig ‘N’ Whistle Indooroopilly has a fantastic write-up in Westside News this week, talking about the renovations the venue is currently undergoing. After 15 great years of exceptional service, the time has come for this iconic venue to have a facelift, with new colour schemes, branding an additional seafood and champagne bar and updated food and …

The post Phuc Deli-Viet has some new neighbours appeared first on .

What to Eat in Central Vietnam

What to Eat in Central Vietnam


2foodtrippers

Check out our Central Vietnam food guide to learn about the foods not to miss in this exciting food region.

Lemongrass Vietnamese Meatballs | The Endless Meal

Lemongrass Vietnamese Meatballs | The Endless Meal


The Endless Meal

If you're looking for meatballs that will rock your world, these Lemongrass Vietnamese Meatballs are it. They're crazy flavorful, tender and easy to make!

Amazon, Carbonara, Pizza: 10 Hot Topics On Food Republic

by Tiffany @ Food Republic

We got down to the nitty gritty this week with the news. Reports of slave labor out of Thailand have sparked further acting to end and prevent it, a huge acquisition in the spirits world made some influences in the stock market and Amazon’s latest venture in expansion has us thinking “where will they end […]

The post Amazon, Carbonara, Pizza: 10 Hot Topics On Food Republic appeared first on Food Republic.

Vietnamese Hot Pot

by vietnamesecuisine @ All About Vietnamese Cuisine

The winter is near, and what is the better way to enjoy a freezing winter night than having a hot spot dinner with your loved ones after a long tired day. Hot spot is one of the fastest and healthiest

The post Vietnamese Hot Pot appeared first on All About Vietnamese Cuisine.

The Weirdest Vietnamese Foods and Drinks

by vietnamesecuisine @ All About Vietnamese Cuisine

Most of people know about Vietnamese Cuisine by its signature dishes, Pho or Banhmi, and its elegant, light, and healthy cooking style, but Vietnamese cuisine is way more than that. In the last couple of my blog posts, I have

The post The Weirdest Vietnamese Foods and Drinks appeared first on All About Vietnamese Cuisine.

10 Foods to Bring Home From Your Travels in Asia

10 Foods to Bring Home From Your Travels in Asia


The Points Guy

These are the Asian favorite everyday foods you should bring back from your next overseas adventure.

A Thrilling Hai Van Pass Adventure With Onetrip

by Phuc Nguyen @ The Christina's Blog

Vietnam is a fabulous country that sings harmonies of the wild jungle and the people that venture through it. That is a destination that you must visit at least once in your life if you seek adventure. One of the most desired places to stay in Vietnam for both foreigners and locals alike is Da […]

The post A Thrilling Hai Van Pass Adventure With Onetrip appeared first on The Christina's Blog.

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